Guest Cherni

Slow Cooked Babyback Ribs

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Guest Cherni

I'm usually the one that cooks our ribs on Sundays. Here's my method, I would like to know what you guys do. I know you guys like your babybacks as much as I do and I'm always looking for improvement.

 

1. High quality BB ribs.

2. I remove the membrane from the bottom of the rack.

2. Rub on some kind of Rib rub, depending on what I have.

3. Put the ribs on my Weber on extremely low heat. (Back burner on extra low)

4. Cook for an hour or so and start glazing with Hoboken Eddie's BBQ Sauce.

5. Every hour spray will water bottle to avoid dryness.

6. Let the ribs cook for 4-5 hours, occassionally re-appplying BBQ sauce.

 

That's all. What do you guys do differently? I don't know if I'm cooking them too long? The meat falls right off the bone which is how I like them, but they do seem to dry out. Let me know what you guys think.

Edited by Cherni

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i usually make a nice "mop" sauce to keep things moist. This can include vinigar, cider even dark beer with brown sugar. It all depends on the rub i use. Ill mop them every 1/2 hr or so. Sometimes ill cook the ribs 1/2 way, then put them in a foil tent, but not close it all the way so the smoke flavor gets in and the juices simmer to keep moist.

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I do a soft boil on them. Make my own suace and cook on med heat for about half an hour, rotating often and reglazing every time.

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Cheif Dick is the bbq guy. i ahve used your 1-6 (with different sauces/rubs.

 

because i don't often have time (or a smoker), i will create a flavorfull water mixture and boil them for 45min - 1hr (naturally cooks off a lot of fat). i'll then pat them down with some type of rub. into a low heat oven for about an hour or so (basting with sauce the last 30 min. and then i'll just finish them on the grill to get more of a glaze and grill flavor.

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I also don't have a smoker. I preheat my oven to 450º. I dry rub on spices, put them in the oven and immediately turn it down to 175º. I bake them at that temp for 4 hours. 30 minutes into the bake I cover the sheet with foil to keep in the moisture.

 

Then I put the ribs in a sheet pan and sauce them overnight. This allows for whatever sauce flavor I have decided to use to seep into the meat nicely. The next day I grill them on relativly low heat, turing the ribs often so as not to char the sauce. Towards the end of the grillin I turn the heat up and apply more sauce for a finish. They fall off the bone and I have yet to be disappointed.

 

The only downside to this method is that it takes planning and you have to do a good amount of the work the day before.

 

EDIT: 4 ways I do this:

 

1) AHSO sauce. Nothing more than a little salt and pepper on the dry rub. Tasty.

2) Yoshin sauce mixed with lemon juice. I also rub the racks with lemon juice before I spice them. another asian flavor, very nice. I use something akin to a Mrs. Dash on these ribs for the dry rub.

3) Bone Suckin' sauce and Bone Suckin Rub. I apply the Bone Suckin' Rub, do the baking, and then for the sauce I use 1/2 Hot Bone Suckin' BBQ sauce and 1/2 Hot Bone Suckin' mustard. Great ribe.

4) I make a sauce with a smoky BBQ sauce (Bull-eye, Kraft, no matter, really), whiskey, and hot pepper. I use dried chili seeds as well as black, while, and red hot pepper. Then I thicken it up with some sliced, jared hot pepper rings. It's a 'to taste' mixture, really. I like my ribs spicy. These ribs also get something akin to a Mrs. Dash for the dry rub.

Edited by Caveman_Nick

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I remove the membrane and brine overnight in a maple syrup brine. I put Kosher salt, pepper and cyenne pepper and smoke for about 3 hours. I put Tony Roma's on them with about an hour left in the smoker. I use cherry wood.

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I remove the membrane and brine overnight in a maple syrup brine.  I put Kosher salt, pepper and cyenne pepper and smoke for about 3 hours.  I put Tony Roma's on them with about an hour left in the smoker.  I use cherry wood.

 

1210423[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

brine ribs... now that sounds good! The family is still talking about the brine turkey i made a couple weeks ago, so this is a logical evolution.

 

:D i have a rack of lamb ordered too....

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Guest Cherni

I used to boil my ribs before grilling, but since making the move over to the "slow cook" I have stopped. Should I continue to do that? Do the great BBQ joints around the country boil their babybacks first or do they just slow grill them?

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I used to boil my ribs before grilling, but since making the move over to the "slow cook" I have stopped. Should I continue to do that? Do the great BBQ joints around the country boil their babybacks first or do they just slow grill them?

 

1211289[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

To each their own. I did the slow cook once, but felt they came out greasier than the soft boil.

 

I HAVE noticed that if you do a few passes with the ribs and don't change the water out the later boiled ribs are TONS tastier....

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Guest Cherni
To each their own. I did the slow cook once, but felt they came out greasier than the soft boil.

 

I HAVE noticed that if you do a few passes with the ribs and don't change the water out the later boiled ribs are TONS tastier....

 

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I bet. I wasn't dissing on the boiling process, I just figured the excess fat burns off anyway if they're on the grill for 4 hours. I wonder how a boil then a slow grill would be.

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I used to boil my ribs before grilling, but since making the move over to the "slow cook" I have stopped. Should I continue to do that? Do the great BBQ joints around the country boil their babybacks first or do they just slow grill them?

 

1211289[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

 

i think the best joints do slow roasting throughout....... but, when you have time and equiptment...np :D

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Guest Cherni
i think the best joints do slow roasting throughout.......  but, when you have time and equiptment...np  :D

 

1211296[/snapback]

 

 

 

That's what I figured. My problem is that my ribs lose moisture. Maybe I'll try wrapping them in foil with BBQ sauce all over the place next time. That might do the trick.

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Guest Cherni
you ever been to city island?

 

1211312[/snapback]

 

 

 

No, where is it?

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Guest Cherni
you ever been to city island?

 

1211312[/snapback]

 

 

 

In the Bronx? No I haven't been. I did go to Dinosaur BBQ last week on 133rd St and 12th Ave. Shady neighborhood, great eats.

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yes.... bronx... go to Sammy's fish box or the Sea Shore..... some of the best baby back i've had.......

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Guest Cherni
yes.... bronx... go to Sammy's fish box or the Sea Shore..... some of the best baby back i've had.......

 

1211383[/snapback]

 

 

 

I'm always down for a new joint.

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I like to slow braise them in a beer, Jamaican jerk, brown sugar garlic and spices sauce that I make. I will then throw them in a home made BBQ sauce for 24 hours and slow smoke them in the the smoker.

 

I think I'll have ribs this weekend!!!!!

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For me, I would never boil them. Just my personal preference. IMO, if you are going to do ribs correctly, take the time and do it right, which means slow cooking. Of course it all depends on your equipment.

 

It sounds like you are doing pretty good for using a gas grill. Some suggestions for the gas grill users:

 

1. Take a cookie sheet and fill with water. Place this on the grill rack closest to the heat source. Then put your ribs on the grill rack the farthest possible distance away from the heat source.

 

2. Get some wood chips/chunks. Soak them in water for several hours before you grill. Then take some heavy duty aluminum foil and break off a piece approximately 18" long. Put some wood chips in the middle and fold the foil up. Poke some holes at each end, then lay the foil DIRECTLY on your heat source. This will create the "smoke" you need to add to the flavor of the ribs. I HIGHLY recommend apple wood for this, though you can also use hickory or oak.

 

3. Sometimes we will do the 2/1/1 method of cooking babybacks. This means 2 hours on the grill/smoker, then wrap in foil for 1 hour, then unwrapped for the last hour. That one hour in the foil really keeps the moisture in. Then that last hour you add your BBQ sauce. I would NOT add sauce any sooner than that: most times the sugar in the sauce will burn on the ribs, which creates that charred crust on the outside of the ribs.

 

4. Arthur Bryant's is a good rub. You may want to grab some BBQ cookbooks from the bookstore and make your own rubs. You can really get some different and distinct flavors, plus it is a heck of a lot more fun to experiment with different spices and will help you understand what each flavor can do. Also, DO NOT apply your rub until about 20 minutes before grill time. The spices in rub tend to try out the meat if you try to marinate overnight with it, and you honestly do not really gain any penetration into the meat overnight. By rubbing it shortly before, the spices are more vibrant on the meat, IMO.

 

The thing about smoking and grilling is this: the journey is equally as rewarding as the destination.

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That's what I figured. My problem is that my ribs lose moisture. Maybe I'll try wrapping them in foil with BBQ sauce all over the place next time. That might do the trick.

 

1211310[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Brining will help that. I'll try and remember to get the maple brine receipe, I got it out of the Dallas Morning News 2 or 3 summers ago. I like it. It adds negligable flavor but tons of moisture to the ribs.

 

Also, DO NOT apply your rub until about 20 minutes before grill time. The spices in rub tend to try out the meat if you try to marinate overnight with it, and you honestly do not really gain any penetration into the meat overnight. By rubbing it shortly before, the spices are more vibrant on the meat, IMO.

 

The thing about smoking and grilling is this: the journey is equally as rewarding as the destination.

 

1211505[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Some really good info here.

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Guest Cherni
Take a cookie sheet and fill with water. Place this on the grill rack closest to the heat source. Then put your ribs on the grill rack the farthest possible distance away from the heat source.

 

Very interesting idea. That would definitely keep the moisture up.

 

 

Brining will help that. I'll try and remember to get the maple brine receipe, I got it out of the Dallas Morning News 2 or 3 summers ago. I like it. It adds negligable flavor but tons of moisture to the ribs.

 

Can't wait to see the brine recipe. Thanks for all the suggestions guys I really appreciate it. I'll be seeing you guys around, this is a great forum.

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Since it's getting close to single digits outside now, I'll be doing my ribs in the oven for the next 3 or 4 months. Preatty easy really. This is a fatherless maleized version of an Alton Brown show.

 

I use a dry rub which is usually brown sugar, kosher salt, chili powder, pepper, cayenne pepper, thyme and onion powder. Prepare the ribs and apply the rub. Wrap in heavy foil and put in the refrig for an hour or so.

 

Open the foil wrap and add some liquid. Approximaley 1 cup. I use a mixture of wine, apple cider vinegar, worcestshire sauce, honey and minced garlic. But, I've used beer and a combination of other liquids as well.

 

Pop in the oven at 250 for about 2 1/2 to 3 hours. I then take them out of the foil, brush with the leftover liquid, (or apply other sauce) and finish under the broiler just until they get a little glaze.

 

Very good ribs, with not much work. Also, I don't even think that I could control the temperature on my smoker or grill outside right now enough to cook ribs right.

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It might sound metrosexual but when I lacked liquid smoke for the rib sauce I used a shot of Starbucks espresso and never went back. Adds the smoke flavor and it mixed great with the sugar/honey in the sauce and also added a cocoa-ey taste that was very mild but there nonetheless. It made the sauce really complex! A touch of Hennessy cognac does well in there too.

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