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Bier Meister

taking my level 1 somm test in vegas

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and of you guys want to meet up?

 

 

may 1-5

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what kinda test is that?

mental

physical

skills

Liver strength

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what kinda test is that?

mental

physical

skills

Liver strength

:wacko: professional wine tasting

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Oh snap, rock on Bier!

 

I'm toying with the idea of taking that test myself. I'm currently taking the WSET advanced class which I finding fun as all get out. I'm making Ms Cid give me three to five blind tastings a week to see if I can get them. Right now I'm about 50% but all she is doing is tossing me the single most obscure stuff she can find.

Edited by Kid Cid

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on blind tasting i am strong in the US, france, germany

 

ok in italy, austrailia/new zealand

 

need a lot more training in south america, spain

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I am assuming you are going through Master Sommelier level one?

 

I have passed level one and two. For level one, your blind tasting skills really arent that important. They teach you how to bling test through their methodology, which is some cases can be "unlearning" some bad habits.

 

read ALL the books they recommend. You will need it.

 

In 2 full days of instruction, we spent one hour on Napa Valley.

 

You will need to know regions from all over the world, including random bits of info about Madeira and other obscure areas that most Americans dont know enough about.

 

I got tripped up on the 13 main regions of Germany, that you need to know. Too many 15 letter names. :wacko:

 

The level one test is mainly about memorizing terms, geography and what varietials grow in which regions. (this also helps you in the deduction process when going through their blind tasting process)

 

best of luck! It was a very intense 2 days, but well worth it!! Who are the Masters administering the test for you?

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yeah... expect that the level 1 is about regions, designations, methodology, etc and identification/tasting to be tested on upper levels.

 

 

i touched upon tasting because kid introduced the topic.

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yeah... expect that the level 1 is about regions, designations, methodology, etc and identification/tasting to be tested on upper levels.

 

 

i touched upon tasting because kid introduced the topic.

 

It is 99% all book learning. The level 2 focuses more on the blind tasting and service styles.

 

You also get into beer and other spirts, but only slightly at level one.

 

Study a LOT of geography amigo . . . plus all the obscure European wine classification laws that are different for each frakin country can get confusing.

 

I think there were 3-4 questions total about the United States on the test . . . .:wacko:

 

My favorite was "what state has the oldest winery in the United States?"

 

Also you will need to know what the definitions of bottle sizes are up to balthazar and salazar . .

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Also Bier . . . I may still have all my notes from my level 1 class. If I find em, you are more than welcome to them if ya can read my chickenscratch handwriting . . .

 

:wacko:

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Man does that sound cool. I am always impressed with you Bier. I wish I had the palate.

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It is 99% all book learning. The level 2 focuses more on the blind tasting and service styles.

 

You also get into beer and other spirts, but only slightly at level one.

 

Study a LOT of geography amigo . . . plus all the obscure European wine classification laws that are different for each frakin country can get confusing.

 

I think there were 3-4 questions total about the United States on the test . . . .:wacko:

 

My favorite was "what state has the oldest winery in the United States?"

 

Also you will need to know what the definitions of bottle sizes are up to balthazar and salazar . .

 

+ 1... Level One is fairly easy and I would think that you may be able to pass it without much studying, Mike! Your wine knowledge is above average... IMHO. The next levels are much harder! Level 1 is 60 questions of multiple choice with one blind tasting, which is for bonus points. You only need to answer 36 questions to pass, if I remember correctly. Good luck and have fun studying!

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+ 1... Level One is fairly easy and I would think that you may be able to pass it without much studying, Mike! Your wine knowledge is above average... IMHO. The next levels are much harder! Level 1 is 60 questions of multiple choice with one blind tasting, which is for bonus points. You only need to answer 36 questions to pass, if I remember correctly. Good luck and have fun studying!

 

I actually disagree slightly. If you are not very conversant with international geography (particularly Germany when I took the test) you can have a hard time with the test.

 

Perhaps it was due to the group I took it with, but a LOT of people were unprepared for the focus on Europe versus everyone else on the test. They (like a LOT of Americans) get too wrapped up in Napa valley and california and neglect the international aspect of the test.

 

I took the level one in 2008, not sure how different it is now versus then . . .

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Do you suck the guys cock before or during the test? :wacko:

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I actually disagree slightly. If you are not very conversant with international geography (particularly Germany when I took the test) you can have a hard time with the test.

 

Perhaps it was due to the group I took it with, but a LOT of people were unprepared for the focus on Europe versus everyone else on the test. They (like a LOT of Americans) get too wrapped up in Napa valley and california and neglect the international aspect of the test.

 

I took the level one in 2008, not sure how different it is now versus then . . .

 

 

You have to understand that the cali regions will take very little time for me, and my travels to france and germay help significantly (and some knowledge of german). I used to have an excellent rote memory....... we'll see how effective it still is.

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You have to understand that the cali regions will take very little time for me, and my travels to france and germay help significantly (and some knowledge of german). I used to have an excellent rote memory....... we'll see how effective it still is.

 

Cali is only 3-4 questions . . but the fact that you have traveled to France and Germany will help TREMNDOUSLy!

 

BTW, I am looking for my notes if ya want em . . .

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Cali is only 3-4 questions . . but the fact that you have traveled to France and Germany will help TREMNDOUSLy!

 

BTW, I am looking for my notes if ya want em . . .

 

LOL... that's what I said! :tup:

 

SEC must have been home schooled by his daddy or maybe he went to Catholic schools... wonder if he gets funny looks at the DMV when he gets down on his knee's? "I'm ready for my test!" :wacko:

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SEC must have been home schooled by his daddy or maybe he went to Catholic schools... wonder if he gets funny looks at the DMV when he gets down on his knee's? "I'm ready for my test!" :tup:

:wacko: Public schools

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Good luck, Mike! I can barely tell white from red, but it all gets ya drunk. :wacko:

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South America is a small area on the test . . so is Australia and NZ. Italy/Spain/Portugal were some of the tougher areas, particularly with the Italian wine classifications . . .

 

I remember a question or two about Austria/Hungary and Greece as well . .

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This is one of the tomes they suggest reading and studying before taking the exam. It is quite large and exhaustive but also quite an excellent piece of work. I'm guessing that you won't need to read it cover to cover as I've been told by a master som that I should be able to pass the level I exam without much trouble and your wine knowledge is better than mine.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Wine-Bible-Karen-MacNeil/dp/1563054345

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I still might have everything in a PDF form except the first class. I'm looking at my binder now and I'd say it's easily 400 pages - maps included.

 

ETA: Honestly, I think you'll do fine. Just read all the suggested reading listed on the site. Some of it's a refresher and some of it's new. Like BP said, there's some stuff on there about maderia but I recall it being heavy on the french and german questions.

 

The Sotheby's World Wine Encyclopedia and The Oxford Companion to Wine were clutch for Level 1.

Edited by twiley

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