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Puddy

Pedophile at Penn State?

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How in the hell can the university leave McQueary in place?

 

It's hard to hear the outrage when their head is in the sand.

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http://www.businessinsider.com/penn-state-...ctures-2011-11#

 

This is unbelievable to me? The students are supporting Joe Paterno and Penn State football over the atrocity that happended to these young boys that will affect them for the rest of their lives. I believe in freedom of speech but this is unfathomable. If my son or daughter was a student at PSU and I knew they were on the street protesting the firing of Paterno they would be off the street in a matter of seconds.

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There were allegations of Sandusky committing these heinous acts back in 1999, and the appointed "heir apparent" was told by Joe that his opportunity to be head coach was never to happen and that the 55 year old Sandusky should accept early retirement.

Why was the "heir apparent", who had all these successful seasons with Joe, told by Joe (as you stated) that he was never going to become the head coach of PSU? :wacko:

Is it because Joe knew something?

 

Then, in 2002 when McQueary reports to him what he saw, he only goes to the AD? :tup:

 

I'm inclined to believe Joe knew something when he told him to retire at the ripe old age of 55 because he knew SOMETHING!! Then, it was confirmed again in 2002! Then, he continues to see Sandusky on campus (with boys) and doesn't ask a question or follow up?

 

As others have said, Joe ran that campus, and could make anything he wanted happen. He simply turned a blind-eye to the situation and preferred to forget about it. This in turn allowed a monster to continue his terror.

 

Joe needed to go. Period.

Edited by millerx

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Penn State Football will receive the death penalty for this.

 

This conspiracy is too big. As they keep digging, they're going to realize just how many people within the organization turned a blind eye to Sandusky over the last fifteen years.

It's going to, and already has, made everything we've seen with Reggie Bush, Ohio State and The U look like petty theft in comparison.

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He should have resigned earlier today on his own.

Exactly what I was thinking. I can't believe he thought he'd make it thru the rest of the season.

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I keep hearing that the rape allegations against Sandusky is just the tip of the iceberg and we are going to be appalled as more information comes to light and we find out just how many may have be "in the know" about all this. Well...

 

Jerry Sandusky Rumored to Have Been 'Pimping Out Young Boys to Rich Donors,' Says Mark Madden

 

In April, Pittsburgh radio host Mark Madden wrote a story revealing Penn State for much of the cover-up of Jerry Sandusky's alleged child rape that has been exposed in the past week. While it didn't raise many eyebrows back then, six months later it looks to be incredibly accurate.

 

On Thursday morning, just hours after legendary head coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham Spanier were fired by the school's board of trustees, Madden was asked on WEEI's The Dennis and Callahan Show what he believes the next piece of news will be.

 

What he said was twice as shocking as anything that's been released thus far.

 

"I can give you a rumor and I can give you something I think might happen," Madden told John Dennis and Gerry Callahan. "I hear there's a rumor that there will be a more shocking development from the Second Mile Foundation -- and hold on to your stomachs, boys, this is gross, I will use the only language I can -- that Jerry Sandusky and Second Mile were pimping out young boys to rich donors. That was being investigated by two prominent columnists even as I speak."

 

After the news spread, Madden later explained via Twitter why he went public with the rumors.

 

"I normally abhor giving RUMORS credence," Madden wrote. "But whole Sandusky scandal started out as a RUMOR. It gets deeper and more disgusting all the time. One of state's top columnists investigating. That adds credence. I am NOT rumor's original source. [Why does] Sandusky deserve benefit of doubt?"

 

Madden also spoke more definitively on Dennis and Callahan to the cover-up efforts at the school and beyond that he expects will be made public soon.

 

"The other thing I think that may eventually become uncovered, and I talked about this in my original article back in April, is that I think they'll find out that Jerry Sandusky was told that he had to retire in exchange for a cover-up," Madden said. "If you look at the timeline, that makes perfect sense, doesn't it?

 

"My opinion is when Sandusky quit, everybody knew -- not just at Penn State," Madden added. "I think it was a very poorly kept secret about college football in general, and that is why he never coached in college football again and retired at the relatively young age of 55. [That's] young for a coach, certainly."

Just like the article states, I don't like to buy into rumors, but things just haven't been adding up to me in this case. Something stinks with the whole timeline of Sandusky leaving the coaching profession at the time he did. I'm not saying I believe this story, but it is food for thought.

Edited by millerx

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To be honest... it wouldn't surprise me at this point.

 

I feel for you Penn State fans, because things are about to get really, really ugly.

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I keep hearing that the rape allegations against Sandusky is just the tip of the iceberg and we are going to be appalled as more information comes to light and we find out just how many may have be "in the know" about all this. Well...

 

 

Just like the article states, I don't like to buy into rumors, but things just haven't been adding up to me in this case. Something stinks with the whole timeline of Sandusky leaving the coaching profession at the time he did. I might not saying I believe this story, but it is food for thought.

 

yep - it just doesn't add up. I mean, he was in line to be JoePa's successor, not to mentioned a relatively young 55 when he "retired"

 

what exactly did Sandusky and JoePa tell other schools that came calling about Sandusky?? did they cover it up that well, or was this known in the coaching fratenrity on some level across college football??

 

just a sick story that looks like it will uncover even more lies and uglyness

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yep - it just doesn't add up. I mean, he was in line to be JoePa's successor, not to mentioned a relatively young 55 when he "retired"

 

what exactly did Sandusky and JoePa tell other schools that came calling about Sandusky?? did they cover it up that well, or was this known in the coaching fratenrity on some level across college football??

 

just a sick story that looks like it will uncover even more lies and uglyness

 

 

It could be that, or something as disgustingly simple as Sandusky had the perv apparatus he wanted with his charity and didn't want to leave it.

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This guy summed up my thoughts perfectly. I agree with him 100%, including his first two points.

 

:wacko:

 

The End of Paterno

College Football, General | Comments

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Let me start with this: I am writing a book about Joe Paterno. I am getting paid a sizable amount of money to do so, some of which I plan to donate to the charity of Joe’s choice, some of which I plan to keep. I have been working on this book, on and off, speed bumps and traffic jams, for a couple of years now. I moved away from my family, to State College, for the football season. I had many hard feelings about that. But I believed — as my wife believed — that it was the right thing to do. I came here to write about one of the giants of sports. And my wife and I both felt that the only way to tell the story, for better and worse, was to be around it every day.

 

The last week has torn me up emotionally. This doesn’t matter, of course. All that matters are the victims of the horrible crimes allegedly committed by former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. I cannot say that enough times. Sometimes, I feel like the last week or so there has been a desperate race among commentators and others to prove that they are MORE against child molesting than anyone else. That makes me sick. We’re all sickened. We’re all heartbroken. We’re all beyond angry, in a place of rage where nothing seems real. The other day, I called it “howling.” I meant that in the purest sense of the word — crying in pain.

 

So, two points to get out of the way:

 

1. I think Joe Paterno had the responsibility as a leader and a man to stop the horrific rapes allegedly committed by Jerry Sandusky, and I believe he will have regrets about this for the rest of his life.

 

2. Because of this, Joe Paterno could no longer coach at Penn State University.

 

Beyond these two points, though, I said I wasn’t going to write about this because I feel like there’s still a lot of darkness around. I don’t know what Joe Paterno knew. I don’t know how he handled it. I don’t know if he followed up. I don’t know anything about Paterno’s role in this except for what little was said about that in the horrifying and stomach-turning grand jury findings. People have jumped to many conclusions about Paterno’s role and his negligence, and they might be right. I’ll say it again: They might be right. But they might be wrong, too. And I’m writing a book about the man. I can’t live in that world of maybes.

 

It hasn’t been easy to stay silent — nor is it my personality. As anyone who knows me will tell you, I will write 5,000 words about an infomercial I don’t like. But I thought it was important that I stay out of the middle of this, observe the scene, and I still think that’s important.

 

But — well, I’ve already said that my emotions don’t matter here, that they are nothing like what the victims went through, but for the purposes of this essay I’ll tell you them anyway: I’ve been wrecked the last week. Writing a book comes from the soul. It consumes you — mentally, emotionally, spiritually, all of it. I have thought about Joe Paterno, his strengths, his flaws, his triumphs, his failures, his core, pretty much nonstop for months now. I have talked to hundreds of people about him in all walks of life. I have read 25 or 30 books about him, countless articles. I’m not saying I know Joe Paterno. I’m saying I know a whole lot about him.

 

And what I know is complicated. But, beyond complications — and I really believe this with all my heart — there’s this, and this is exclusively my opinion: Joe Paterno has lived a profoundly decent life.

 

Nobody has really wanted to say this lately, and I grasp that. The last week has obviously shed a new light on him and his program — a horrible new light — and if you have any questions about how I feel about all that, please scroll back up to my two points at the top.

 

But I have seen some things in the last few days that have felt rotten, utterly wrong — a piling on that goes even beyond excessive, a dancing on the grave that makes me ill. Joe Paterno has lived a whole life. He has improved the lives of countless people. I know — I’ve talked to hundreds of them. Almost every day I walk by the library that he and his wife, Sue, built. I walk by the religious center that tries to bring people together, and his name is on the list of major donors. I hear the stories, the countless stories, of the kindnesses that came naturally to him, of the way he stuck with people in their worst moments, of the belief he had that everybody could do a little bit better — as a football player, as a student, as a human being. I’m not going to tell you these stories now, because you can’t hear them. Nobody can hear them in the howling.

 

But I will say that I am sickened, absolutely sickened, that some of those people whose lives were fundamentally inspired and galvanized by Joe Paterno have not stepped forward to stand up for him this week, have stood back and allowed him to be painted as an inhuman monster who was only interested in his legacy, even at the cost of the most heinous crimes against children imaginable.

 

Shame on them.

 

And why? I’ll tell you my opinion: Because they were afraid. And I understand that. A kind word for Joe Paterno in this storm is taken by many as a pro vote for a child molester. A quick, “Wait a minute, Joe Paterno is a good man. Let’s see what happened here” is translated as an attempt to minimize the horror of what Jerry Sandusky is charged with doing. It takes courage to stand behind someone you believe in when it’s this bad outside. It takes courage to stand up for a man in peril, even if he stood up for you.

 

And that’s shameful. I have not wanted to speak because it’s not my place to speak. I’m Joe Paterno’s biographer. I’m here to write about the man. I’m not here to write a fairy tale, and I’m not here to write a hit job, and I hope to be nowhere near either extreme. I’m here to write a whole story. I’ve had people ask me: “Will you include all this in the book?” Well, OF COURSE I will — this is the tragic ending of a legendary career. I’m going to wait for evidence, and if it turns out that Joe Paterno knowingly covered this up, then I will write that with all the power and fury I have in me.

 

I will wait, though. I will have to wait.

 

But then, yeah, I opened my big mouth. On Thursday morning, I went to speak at the “Paterno and the Media” class on the Penn State campus — I have spoken at the class the last two or three years. This was obviously one day after Paterno had been fired, and the campus had been turned inside out. I woke up wondering if I really should go. But I decided I had to go.

 

And when I was asked questions, I had to say how I felt. It spilled out of me. I suppose it caused a bit of a Twitter uproar — I say “I suppose,” because for the first time in memory I am not checking Twitter, and I think I’ll stay away for a while — but what I remember saying is:

 

1. Joe Paterno is responsible for what happens on his watch. Period.

 

2. People are making assumptions about what Joe did or didn’t know, what Joe did or didn’t do, and I can’t tell you that those assumptions are wrong. But I can tell you that they are assumptions based on one side of the story.

 

3. We are in a top-you world where everyone is not only trying to report something faster but is also trying to report something ANGRIER. One guy wants Joe Paterno to resign, the next wants him to be fired, the next wants him to be fired this minute, the next wants him to be fired and arrested, the next wants him to be fired, arrested and jailed, on and on, until we’ve lost sight of who actually committed the crimes here.

 

4. I think the University could not possibly have handled this worse. It was disgusting and disgraceful, the method in which they fired Joe Paterno after 60 years of service, and yes, I do think Paterno was a scapegoat. Of course he was. I’ve already said that he had to be let go. But to let him dangle out there, take up all the headlines, face the bulk of the media pressure, absolutely, that’s the very definition of scapegoat. Three people were indicted and arrested. A fourth, I hear, will be indicted soon. Joe Paterno is not one of the four.

 

5. It is still unclear what Paterno did in this case. It will remain unclear for a while. You might be one of the hundreds and hundreds of people I’ve heard from who know EXACTLY what Paterno did. He HAD to know this. He DEFINITELY knew that. He COULD have done something. I respect that. Joe Paterno’s a public figure. You have every right to believe what you want to believe and be absolutely certain about it. But since we have not heard from Joe, not heard from former athletic director Tim Curley, not heard from GA/assistant coach Mike McQueary, not heard from anyone who was in the room, I’ll repeat: It’s unclear. A determined grand jury did not charge Joe Paterno with any crime. A motivated reporting barrage, so far, anyway, has not uncovered a single thing that can tell us definitively what Joe Paterno knew.

 

You can say that he knew enough to stop this, and I’d say you were right. I have tried so hard to make it clear that I am not defending Joe Paterno’s actions or inactions, but I know that won’t be enough. You may be writing an email right now telling me how terrible child molestation is, how awful a person Joe Paterno is, how awful a person I am for wanting to wait and see. I understand. This case hits emotions that are unstoppable.

 

But I will say this: Paterno has paid a price here. His job is gone. His life’s work has been soiled. His reputation is in tatters. Maybe that should be the price. Maybe there should be more of a price. You don’t have to type: “Well, his price is nothing like the price of those victims…” I already know that.

 

But I think the way Joe Paterno has lived his life has earned him something more than instant fury, more than immediate assumptions of the worst, more than the happy cheers of critics who have always believed that there was something phony about the man and his ideals. He deserves what I would hope we all deserve — for the truth to come out, or, anyway, the closest thing to truth we can find.

 

I don’t think Joe Paterno has gotten that. And I think that’s sad.

 

And with that, I’m going back underground to wrestle with my book and doubts and emotions and everything that goes with that.

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I disagree with that article.

 

If you are putting put points ona "moral scale", with a library on one side, and failing to protect a child on the other, how does that balance out?

 

The author is correct about the court of public opinion, but being a scapegoat is ridiculous. At the end of the day he is the damn coach, and responsible for what happens on his watch. Him getting fired does not in any way diminish the culpability of the other motherburritoers involved in this. he just happens to be a more recognizable name and figurehead of the program. But guess what? that comes with the burritoing job. You want to be the larger than life coash with a million victories? You want to be the BMOC? Then you also accept the responsibility for things that happen on your watch. Scapegoats insinuate that they shouldnt be taking the blame. Everyone involved in this deserve blame, and the ones that are "less" responsible get to lose their jobs. The ones more responsible can look forward to charges.

 

And at the end of the day it doesnt matter how many libraries he builds, it will never equal failing to protect children that couldnt protect themselves. Pretty black and white.

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I disagree with that article.

 

If you are putting put points ona "moral scale", with a library on one side, and failing to protect a child on the other, how does that balance out?

 

The author is correct about the court of public opinion, but being a scapegoat is ridiculous. At the end of the day he is the damn coach, and responsible for what happens on his watch. Him getting fired does not in any way diminish the culpability of the other motherburritoers involved in this. he just happens to be a more recognizable name and figurehead of the program. But guess what? that comes with the burritoing job. You want to be the larger than life coash with a million victories? You want to be the BMOC? Then you also accept the responsibility for things that happen on your watch. Scapegoats insinuate that they shouldnt be taking the blame. Everyone involved in this deserve blame, and the ones that are "less" responsible get to lose their jobs. The ones more responsible can look forward to charges.

 

And at the end of the day it doesnt matter how many libraries he builds, it will never equal failing to protect children that couldnt protect themselves. Pretty black and white.

 

As stated in the article. I agree that he should have done more, and I agree that he had to be fired.

 

I also agree that protecting a child is much more important on the moral scale than building a library.

Edited by Menudo

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As stated in the article. I agree that he should have done more, and I agree that he had to be fired.

 

I also agree that protecting a child is much more important on the moral scale than building a library.

 

The article is also bemoaning of "why isnt anyone saying that he has done good things in his life?" Because this will overshadow anything good he has done . . . hence the "moral scale".

 

Paterno should have stepped down immediately, but drew more ire by saying "dont worry about me, Ill retire at the end of the year". That seems incredibly self absorbed and out of touch. Paterno is by no means the guiltiest party involved, but he does share culpability here. He is also not only a college coach, he is JOE PATERNO, winningest coach in college history. That will magnify his "role" based on his celebrity status. But then again, that comes with the big boy chair. "With great power comes great responsibility". JoePa had that power at that university. To imply that he was just following the chain of command is disingenuous at best.

 

bah . . . Menudo, sorry to jump down your throat, but as a father this whole situation is enraging to me. It is also wayyyyy too soon for any canonization pieces standing up for Paterno. More time and more facts need to be known, and until then, he has to reap the whirlwind.

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The article is also bemoaning of "why isnt anyone saying that he has done good things in his life?" Because this will overshadow anything good he has done . . . hence the "moral scale".

 

Paterno should have stepped down immediately, but drew more ire by saying "dont worry about me, Ill retire at the end of the year". That seems incredibly self absorbed and out of touch. Paterno is by no means the guiltiest party involved, but he does share culpability here. He is also not only a college coach, he is JOE PATERNO, winningest coach in college history. That will magnify his "role" based on his celebrity status. But then again, that comes with the big boy chair. "With great power comes great responsibility". JoePa had that power at that university. To imply that he was just following the chain of command is disingenuous at best.

 

bah . . . Menudo, sorry to jump down your throat, but as a father this whole situation is enraging to me. It is also wayyyyy too soon for any canonization pieces standing up for Paterno. More time and more facts need to be known, and until then, he has to reap the whirlwind.

 

This has been beyond tough for me. I'm also a father, and am as sick as anyone over what has happened. Also, being let down by a guy who I have admired so much is tough to deal with as well. I'll be at the game Saturday to support the players, who I also feel for. They did nothing wrong. It has been a tough week to be a PSU fan. :wacko:

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Scapegoats insinuate that they shouldnt be taking the blame.

I understand what you're saying, but I think you're incorrect in thinking that the term "scapegoat" means that the person should take no blame. It just means that he's taking the brunt of the blame, while others are hiding behind him, which is exactly what has taken place. Like the author said, he's not defending Paterno, but like it or not, Paterno IS a scapegoat in the events that have taken place, to at least some degree.

 

Edit: I guess it depends on how you view the term "scapegoat," so to say you're incorrect might be a bit harsh. I, personally, view the term differently... Doesn't mean he's not partially to blame, but I think he's getting more than his fair share of the attention, given the circumstances. On the other hand, he's by far more of a "public figure" than the other players in this mess, so I think it's to be expected that most of the talk would be about Joe and Penn State, and not necessarily the people who actually committed the crimes (assuming JoePa didn't himself commit any crime). Whether that's "fair" or not... who knows. I guess it's part of being the figure head, famous, etc.

 

Another totally unrelated example would be Lee Harvey Oswald... I view him as a scapegoat in the events relating to the death of JFK. Not in the sense that he was innocent, by any means, but in the sense that he was the person most people pinned it on, even though I'm fairly certain it's a lot more comlpicated than that (and others were likely involved). I don't mean to open up another can of worms here... just a topic that came to mind when thinking of the word "scapegoat."

Edited by Gopher

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If I was McQueery, I would have never had to tell Paterno. The cops would have found out after they forcibly had to pull me off this sick ____'s beaten corpse.

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If I was McQueery, I would have never had to tell Paterno. The cops would have found out after they forcibly had to pull me off this sick ____'s beaten corpse.

Taking into account the circumstances - Sandusky's apparent stature within the Penn State football system and McQueary basically trying to work his way up in that system, I can almost understand why his flight instinct kicked in at the time he witnessed the incident. However, it shouldn't take more than a little bit of time to do the soul-searching necessary to know what the right thing is to do - call the fricking police.

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I was at the game Saturday, but, I'm just getting a chance to post now. I was proud of the way everyone handled themselves. There were no incidents that I saw, and there were some touching moments that gave me the chills and brought several to tears.

 

1. The Penn State players walking out slowly, arm and arm, rather than doing their usual run onto the field. These are players who had to deal with a lot of animosity, due to no fault of their own. The crowd reception during this slow walk was great.

 

2. Then, the best moment of all, the Nebraska and Penn State players, coaches, and alumni walking toward and meeting in the center of the field. They got on their knees and were led in prayer by a Nebraska assistant coach. When finished the crowd gave an extremely loud and heartfelt standing ovation.

 

3. At the end of the game, the crowd cheered the players of both teams. It sounded like Beaver Stadium after a victory. The crowd was appreciative of the effort by the players of both these teams, who dealt with a week long of distractions.

 

It was a brief moment of pride to distract from the horrific events that took place during the last week. The Nebraska fans that I ran into were nothing but class through and through. It was definitely a memorable day at Beaver Stadium.

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2. Then, the best moment of all, the Nebraska and Penn State players, coaches, and alumni walking toward and meeting in the center of the field. They got on their knees and were led in prayer by a Nebraska assistant coach. When finished the crowd gave an extremely loud and heartfelt standing ovation.

 

This was very emotional to even watch on TV....very touching. What was sad though was, during the silence, there were times of drunkards shouting out pro-JoePa yells. It was very inappropriate, and a slap in the face to the very victims who were being remembered.

 

But all in all, the day appeared to be a touch of class, and go a long way to restoring pride and faith in the university.

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his lawyer prepped him well, he was quiet for a week and a half to tell that bs story?....and anyone who bought that crap is the problem because they can't accomplish critical thinking...

 

....so a grown man was hanging around little kids and showering with them like they are his buddies and whipping them with a towel?.....that's the best he could come up with?.... :wacko:

 

I am already angry just typing this and if he gets off clean I will know this world is hell....and nothing more..

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But I will say that I am sickened, absolutely sickened, that some of those people whose lives were fundamentally inspired and galvanized by Joe Paterno have not stepped forward to stand up for him this week, have stood back and allowed him to be painted as an inhuman monster who was only interested in his legacy, even at the cost of the most heinous crimes against children imaginable.

 

I haven't heard anyone call paterno an "inhuman monster" (drama queen writer :wacko:), but regarding the part in bold, I would say that particular shoe fits :tup:

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