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How sneaky is Bush? Very much so. Never heard of this


cliaz
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http://www.humaneventsonline.com/article.p...497&this=stupid

 

Bush Administration Quietly Plans NAFTA Super Highway

 

by Jerome R. Corsi

Posted Jun 12, 2006

 

Quietly but systematically, the Bush Administration is advancing the plan to build a huge NAFTA Super Highway, four football-fields-wide, through the heart of the U.S. along Interstate 35, from the Mexican border at Laredo, Tex., to the Canadian border north of Duluth, Minn.

 

Once complete, the new road will allow containers from the Far East to enter the United States through the Mexican port of Lazaro Cardenas, bypassing the Longshoreman’s Union in the process. The Mexican trucks, without the involvement of the Teamsters Union, will drive on what will be the nation’s most modern highway straight into the heart of America. The Mexican trucks will cross border in FAST lanes, checked only electronically by the new “SENTRI” system. The first customs stop will be a Mexican customs office in Kansas City, their new Smart Port complex, a facility being built for Mexico at a cost of $3 million to the U.S. taxpayers in Kansas City.

 

As incredible as this plan may seem to some readers, the first Trans-Texas Corridor segment of the NAFTA Super Highway is ready to begin construction next year. Various U.S. government agencies, dozens of state agencies, and scores of private NGOs (non-governmental organizations) have been working behind the scenes to create the NAFTA Super Highway, despite the lack of comment on the plan by President Bush. The American public is largely asleep to this key piece of the coming “North American Union” that government planners in the new trilateral region of United States, Canada and Mexico are about to drive into reality.

 

Just examine the following websites to get a feel for the magnitude of NAFTA Super Highway planning that has been going on without any new congressional legislation directly authorizing the construction of the planned international corridor through the center of the country.

 

* NASCO, the North America SuperCorridor Coalition Inc., is a “non-profit organization dedicated to developing the world’s first international, integrated and secure, multi-modal transportation system along the International Mid-Continent Trade and Transportation Corridor to improve both the trade competitiveness and quality of life in North America.” Where does that sentence say anything about the USA? Still, NASCO has received $2.5 million in earmarks from the U.S. Department of Transportation to plan the NAFTA Super Highway as a 10-lane limited-access road (five lanes in each direction) plus passenger and freight rail lines running alongside pipelines laid for oil and natural gas. One glance at the map of the NAFTA Super Highway on the front page of the NASCO website will make clear that the design is to connect Mexico, Canada, and the U.S. into one transportation system.

 

* Kansas City SmartPort Inc. is an “investor based organization supported by the public and private sector” to create the key hub on the NAFTA Super Highway. At the Kansas City SmartPort, the containers from the Far East can be transferred to trucks going east and west, dramatically reducing the ground transportation time dropping the containers off in Los Angeles or Long Beach involves for most of the country. A brochure on the SmartPort website describes the plan in glowing terms: “For those who live in Kansas City, the idea of receiving containers nonstop from the Far East by way of Mexico may sound unlikely, but later this month that seemingly far-fetched notion will become a reality.”

 

* The U.S. government has housed within the Department of Commerce (DOC) an “SPP office” that is dedicated to organizing the many working groups laboring within the executive branches of the U.S., Mexico and Canada to create the regulatory reality for the Security and Prosperity Partnership. The SPP agreement was signed by Bush, President Vicente Fox, and then-Prime Minister Paul Martin in Waco, Tex., on March 23, 2005. According to the DOC website, a U.S.-Mexico Joint Working Committee on Transportation Planning has finalized a plan such that “(m)ethods for detecting bottlenecks on the U.S.-Mexico border will be developed and low cost/high impact projects identified in bottleneck studies will be constructed or implemented.” The report notes that new SENTRI travel lanes on the Mexican border will be constructed this year. The border at Laredo should be reduced to an electronic speed bump for the Mexican trucks containing goods from the Far East to enter the U.S. on their way to the Kansas City SmartPort.

 

* The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is overseeing the Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC) as the first leg of the NAFTA Super Highway. A 4,000-page environmental impact statement has already been completed and public hearings are scheduled for five weeks, beginning next month, in July 2006. The billions involved will be provided by a foreign company, Cintra Concessions de Infraestructuras de Transporte, S.A. of Spain. As a consequence, the TTC will be privately operated, leased to the Cintra consortium to be operated as a toll-road.

 

The details of the NAFTA Super Highway are hidden in plan view. Still, Bush has not given speeches to bring the NAFTA Super Highway plans to the full attention of the American public. Missing in the move toward creating a North American Union is the robust public debate that preceded the decision to form the European Union. All this may be for calculated political reasons on the part of the Bush Administration.

 

A good reason Bush does not want to secure the border with Mexico may be that the administration is trying to create express lanes for Mexican trucks to bring containers with cheap Far East goods into the heart of the U.S., all without the involvement of any U.S. union workers on the docks or in the trucks

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I followed the links from the article... and I didn't see anything about "four football fields wide"... or anything to panic about really.

 

Is there a less alarmist article on this subject? I find it hard to believe that any road would be 400 yards wide, even if it was importing every Walmart special from China 24 hours a day.

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I followed the links from the article... and I didn't see anything about "four football fields wide"... or anything to panic about really.

 

Is there a less alarmist article on this subject? I find it hard to believe that any road would be 400 yards wide, even if it was importing every Walmart special from China 24 hours a day.

 

Here is an HTML of a PDF put out by the Kansas City Company

 

Debunks some of the claims, and mentions rail quite a bit. But it surely looks like an actual project... Maybe the US is hoping to blow up terrorist bombs in Mexico instead of the US...

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Despite the pro-union slant, this does not surprise me. You would thinnk the other Texas ports would have more influence on him, though.

 

 

If anything I think Katrina and Rita showed everyone how precarious our port situation is. I think of this as some insurance should that happen again.

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If anything I think Katrina and Rita showed everyone how precarious our port situation is. I think of this as some insurance should that happen again.

 

 

I read that in the first summary of the project, and it made sense.

 

Our country is getting more populous, and our ports are overwhelmed. I don't see a problem with looking at new solutions.

 

If this causes more competition from foreign manufacturers, I guess U.S. manufacturers will need to find a way to compete. That's not anti-union unless you think that union salaries are the only problem of US Companies, and I don't.

 

As far as customs... if some dirty bomb blows up as the train or truck passes through Texas and Kansas... well... at least it wasn't a part of the country people actually care about. :D

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If this causes more competition from foreign manufacturers, I guess U.S. manufacturers will need to find a way to compete. That's not anti-union unless you think that union salaries are the only problem of US Companies, and I don't.

 

If we are at a point where some American companies can not compete, then we are at a point where we no longer need some American companies. I agree with you that Unions are not the only problem American companies have, however it is one of the things that most of the large companies that are in financial binds have in common. The unfortunate side effect of this new super highway is that it will cause some Americans in the manufacturing field to lose thier jobs to lower paid foreigners. Howerver, it will also open thier markets up to us for items we are uniquely situated to sell, and provide us a secondary means to get imports into the country when the next tragedy hits one of our major ports.

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I worked as a Product Manager for a toy company for several years. All of the toys I made were of course, made in China and shipped here. Wal-Mart and other discount retailers dictated the price points and necessitated the use of cheaper offshore labor. That being said, we ALWAYS used Americans for key positions in the DESIGN of the product and packaging. It seems to me that is the way America is going, with the upper eschelon of task staying and the lower levels od tasks shipping offshore. We see that in IT, with India taking many "coding" jobs, but always under the guidance of and following designs by Americans. When you depend on the foreign suppliers to design product (code) as well as actually make it, you are in trouble. The cultural disconnect is just too wide. I had to constantly guide the Chinese in thier making our products, as I have also had to do with the Indians I have used. America is becoming a nation of managers, IMHO.

Edited by cre8tiff
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I agree with you that Unions are not the only problem American companies have, however it is one of the things that most of the large companies that are in financial binds have in common.

 

 

The other one being the outrageously out of proportion executive compensation.

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The other one being the outrageously out of proportion executive compensation.

 

 

I will actually agree with you to a point there, though that is at least in some way based upon the free market, and what investers are willing to digest. Another reason to be pointed to is regulations, both labor and enviromental.

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Another reason to be pointed to is regulations, both labor and enviromental.

 

 

You're absolutely right.

 

The amount of money it takes to bribe congressmen into keeping our labor and environmental regulations in the dark ages is very costly to businesses.

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You're absolutely right.

 

The amount of money it takes to bribe congressmen into keeping our labor and environmental regulations in the dark ages is very costly to businesses.

 

 

It is a cost of doing business here that many in foriegn countries don't have to put up with. I'm not saying that regulations are right or wrong, just that they impact the bottom line of a business, and how competitive it can be. There is no way to argue that.

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It is a cost of doing business here that many in foriegn countries don't have to put up with. I'm not saying that regulations are right or wrong, just that they impact the bottom line of a business, and how competitive it can be. There is no way to argue that.

 

I agree. That is one of the things that is a negative for a global market...from what I recall, wasn't there a concern with a level playing field between American business and Mexican business as far as regulations, etc. when NAFTA was first introduced? I seem to recall that the trucking industry was not real happy about it because the Mexican trucking industry didn't have the same constraints as the American trucking industry.

 

And, Atomic, you can't actually believe the labor regulations for China, Indonesia, etc. are comparable to the US? Dark Ages my ass.

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It is a cost of doing business here that many in foriegn countries don't have to put up with. I'm not saying that regulations are right or wrong, just that they impact the bottom line of a business, and how competitive it can be. There is no way to argue that.

 

 

What would the cost be to the economy/all of us if there were no environmental regulations?

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What would the cost be to the economy/all of us if there were no environmental regulations?

 

 

That is hard to answer, and I doubt that it can be aswered completely by anyone. There are several countries that have little or no enviromental regulations right now. For years the US opperated with little or no regulation. I know the world wouldn't end tomorrow. Again I didn't say that the regulations were right or wrong, I just said they had an impact on US businesses that they do not on many of our competitiors.

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I think you all are missing the point that there is not stopping at the US border until freaking Kansas. Anyone with a nuke could ride on in through mexico of all places where their security is a donkey and one mexican taking a nap, roll up into the US heart land and lay waste to our bread basket.

Edited by cliaz
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I think you all are missing the point that there is not stopping at the US border until freaking Kansas. Anyone with a nuke could ride on in through mexico of all places where their security is a donkey and one mexican taking a nap, roll up into the US heart land and lay waste to our bread basket.

 

Admit it, you are worried about your first round first overall draft pick getting nuked in KC.

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