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Bennett to the Rams?

By: Viking Update Staff

Date: Jun 28, 2006

 

The Saints are having ongoing discussions with the Rams about a potential trade for Bennett. The deal could reunite Bennett with former offensive coordinator Scott Linehan -- now the head coach of the Rams. The Rams suddenly have a need at running back since Marshall Faulk, who has been phased out of the Rams offense in favor of Steven Jackson, is scheduled to have more surgery on his own injured knee, which could result in him missing the entire 2006 season -- if not marking the end of his career.

 

No deal has been struck yet, as the Saints try to measure how close to 100 percent they expect McAllister to be. But, after traveling up and down the Mississippi River over the last four months, Bennett may well find himself landing in between Minnesota and New Orleans when all is said and done.

:D

If the Texans still want to be players in the Bennett sweepstakes, the ante just got a little higher methinks.

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Just want to add a personal note here.

 

I know it's "what you've done for me today" that counts in FFL, but when Marshal officially retires, I think FFL'ers everywhere should pause and raise a glass in toast.

 

While there have been many "#1" FFL players in the past 15 years, I think Marshall was the first true "beast".

 

Not a Faulk thread, but a Bennett/Rams thread. Carry on.

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Are you forgetting one Emmitt Smith?

 

While Faulk was indeed a beast, Emmitt was perhaps the "first".

 

 

I'm not forgetting Emmit, and I'm not joining another argument about SMith as best ever. (One of them for sure, and above faulk in that discussion for sure)

He scored a lot of TDs (all of them?), got a lot of yards, etc.

 

Faulk in his heyday was un-freaking believeable to watch. Whether you had him or not on your team, he was the most exciting guy to watch (in my opinion) in a football game.

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I'm not forgetting Emmit, and I'm not joining another argument about SMith as best ever. (One of them for sure, and above faulk in that discussion for sure)

He scored a lot of TDs (all of them?), got a lot of yards, etc.

 

Faulk in his heyday was un-freaking believeable to watch. Whether you had him or not on your team, he was the most exciting guy to watch (in my opinion) in a football game.

 

Not to turn this into another Barry vs. Emmitt thread, but c'mon! Barry! Barry! Barry! :D

 

 

 

 

 

:D

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Walter Payton is "THEE GREATEST" bar NONE!!

 

Bennett to Rams is a great fit for the Rams and Bennett. Believe this raises the Deuce stakes a tad more..as all moves on Bennett is contingent on Deuce being close to 100%.... :D:D

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Walter Payton is "THEE GREATEST" bar NONE!!

 

Bennett to Rams is a great fit for the Rams and Bennett. Believe this raises the Deuce stakes a tad more..as all moves on Bennett is contingent on Deuce being close to 100%.... :D:D

 

 

 

1. Jim Brown (1957-65)

There has been a busload of bigger backs and a fleet of faster ones. A select group has been stronger. Seven have gained more career yards. But none was the total package that defined the Cleveland Browns’ superstar. The team wasn’t named for him, but it might as well have been. Former NFL coach George Allen once said Brown “was not only the greatest running back of all time, but one of the four or five finest professional football players of all time. He was a very big, very fast guy who combined size and speed, strength and speed, power and elusiveness better than any other runner pro football has ever had. He was a fullback who played halfback.”

 

Brown never missed a game in his nine seasons, earning Pro Bowl honors every year. He rushed for at least 1,000 yards seven times, fell 4 yards short once, and led the league in rushing eight times. He did it all while playing in the era of 12- and 14-game seasons. He set the NFL single-season record of 1,863 yards, in the 14-game 1963 season, when he averaged a remarkable 6.4 yards per carry. He led the league in rushing touchdowns a record five times in his career.

 

Noteworthy stat: Brown’s career average of 5.2 yards per carry is the highest in NFL history for any back with 750 or more carries. Imagine if he played 13 seasons like Payton and Smith.

 

2. Barry Sanders (1989-98)

Is there any doubt the elusive Detroit Lions’ star would’ve been the first to pass Walter Payton if he hadn’t abruptly retired before the start of the 1999 season, when he needed only 1,457 yards – about a season’s worth – to be No. 1? Trying to figure out why Sanders gave up a sport he dominated is as difficult as it was trying to tackle him. He frustrated many a defender with his slippery, back-and-forth elusiveness, probably causing more missed tackles than any runner in history. “Four times on one play!” linebacker Bryan Cox said. Sanders’ dazzling cuts, especially on the artificial turf at the Silverdome, were an annual Thanksgiving Day highlight reel.

 

He earned four league rushing titles and was a Pro Bowl selection in each of his 10 seasons, en route to piling up 15,269 yards by age 30. “Barry was the ultimate back,” said Jets Pro Bowl runner Curtis Martin. “His ability to change directions and make big plays was beyond Emmitt or anyone else. He’s the best by far. He’s a running back’s running back. He had all the moves the rest of us only dream about.”

 

Noteworthy stat: In 1997, Sanders became the third player ever to run for at least 2,000 yards when he gained 2,053, including a record 14 straight 100-yard games.

 

 

3.Emmitt Smith (1990-2004)

On Oct. 27, 2002, Smith took over the top of the all-time rushing list, a prime example of a runner who has always stood for substance over style. He already led the league in carries. Sure, he can avoid tacklers, but the running back, who will retire as a Cowboy after a short stint with the Cardinals, was at his best when he runs right through them. “Emmitt is a warrior,” former Cardinals coach Dave McGinnis said. “His mentality is he’s never going to be beaten, and he’s not going to accept defeat. It’s not like he’s talent-free. But it’s that mentality that puts him over the top.”

 

Giants general manager Ernie Accorsi is another admirer of Smith’s true grit. “The game is won on the third-and-2s and fourth-and-1s,” Ernie Accorsi said. “I'm not so sure in the last 25 years that, as an opponent, Emmitt Smith wouldn't be the last guy I'd want to see on fourth-and-1 at the goal line. He's going to get into the end zone.” And he did it regardless of how his team was doing. “He’s been there every week – good years, bad years, Super Bowl years, four-win seasons. That’s the mark of a true warrior,” said Tennessee Titans GM Floyd Reese.

 

Noteworthy stat: Smith has rushed for an NFL record 164 touchdowns.

 

4.Walter Payton (1975-87)

His nickname, “Sweetness,” was a tribute to his personality, not his running style. Even at a modest-sized 5-10, 202 pounds, Payton epitomized the bruising, roughhouse persona of the Chicago Bears for whom he missed just one game in a 13-year career. “What people didn’t know was how rough he was,” said Matt Millen, a former Raiders linebacker. “He didn’t give straight arms, he’d punch you. Or he would lower his shoulder and kind of jump into you. He was one of the few who got personal fouls running the ball.”

 

Payton caught passes (a record for running backs of 492 when he retired) and blocked, too, anything to help a team that needed plenty. Before he earned a Super Bowl ring with a team known for its intimidating defense in 1985, Payton endured nine years of futility as Chicago compiled a 61-70 record. He willingly took as much as he gave, though, averaging more than 20 carries a game in eight of his first 10 seasons. “For most of his career, he took on the NFL with no offensive line,” ex-Chargers tight end Kellen Winslow said. And not once did Payton gripe.

 

Noteworthy stat: In 1977 against the Vikings, Payton carried 40 times for a then-NFL record 275 yards en route to an MVP season in which he rushed for 1,852 yards.

 

5.O.J. Simpson (1969-79)

Before he became accused of more sinister actions, “The Juice” was an electrifying runner with unequaled explosiveness at the line of scrimmage that allowed him to use his world-class sprinter’s speed far downfield. His spectacular runs made the Buffalo Bills’ franchise so popular, the city built huge stadium in the suburb of Orchard Park. Simpson’s accomplishments – he retired No. 2 on the all-time list behind Jim Brown and has an NFL-best six 200-yard games – are more remarkable when you realize that he played mostly on poor teams. The Bills made the playoffs only once in his nine seasons and were 43-81-2.

 

Former NFL coach George Allen said Simpson “was the best late-game running back I ever saw, even better than Brown. No one ever took a beating better.” He was hardly touched, however, early when he was – incredulously – used as a receiver, kick returner and “decoy” in his first three seasons. Simpson didn’t have a 1,000-yard season until Lou Saban took over in 1972. He barely totaled 1,000 yards in his final two injury-riddled seasons in San Francisco.

 

Noteworthy stat: In 1973, “The Juice” gained an NFL record 2,003 yards in 14 games, including 200 yards in the snow at Shea Stadium against the Jets in the season finale.

Edited by gordo721
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lol @ all the Bennett rumours. He's this year's Ant. Smith/T Jones/etc etc - ie the RB that so many people think so many teams should nab because he has a lot of potential/upside - despite an extremely erratic (if not outright lame) career.

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lol @ all the Bennett rumours. He's this year's Ant. Smith/T Jones/etc etc - ie the RB that so many people think so many teams should nab because he has a lot of potential/upside - despite an extremely erratic (if not outright lame) career.

 

 

Turned out pretty good for T. Jones the past couple of season.

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