Big F'n Dave

Laminate flooring

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Just bought 550 sq. ft. of this for my foyer, living room and kitchen. Considered installing it myself, but I'm about the least mechanically-inclined f'er I know. I've got a guy who knows what he's doing willing to install it for $800.

Should I try to do it myself or should I bite the bullet and pay to have it done? Anybody ever installed any of this themselves?

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I never installed it before but know someone who has. It was not that hard. i would see if your local hardware store has training classes on this. If not you may have to hire someone but I would get 3 quotes.

 

My boss once had me go through the setps to help him hang a smoke detector, therefore you come in second as te least handy. :D

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Just bought 550 sq. ft. of this for my foyer, living room and kitchen. Considered installing it myself, but I'm about the least mechanically-inclined f'er I know. I've got a guy who knows what he's doing willing to install it for $800.

Should I try to do it myself or should I bite the bullet and pay to have it done? Anybody ever installed any of this themselves?

 

 

 

My dad and I installed it in my living room, hall way and dining room. It wasnt very difficult. like most projects the hard part was the prep work of getting rid of the old stuff. The hardest part of installing it is getting the first row done. I live in an older house and the rooms are not completely square so we had to rip the first row so the boards were even when we got to the opposite wall. After that it is really easy. It was just measure, cut and snap together.

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it is pretty easy once you get going. the trick is to always triple check your cuts at the end of a row. i used up alot of flooring cutting the wrong end off. did you buy a little more than needed becasue there will be some waste.

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If the stuff you bought isn't too pricey, I'd consider doing it yourself. I did it myself in my kitchen and other than a couple minor mistakes(nobody notices but me) I think I did pretty good for a first time. Oh, my knees and back were killing me for like two weeks after though.

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If the stuff you bought isn't too pricey, I'd consider doing it yourself. I did it myself in my kitchen and other than a couple minor mistakes(nobody notices but me) I think I did pretty good for a first time. Oh, my knees and back were killing me for like two weeks after though.

 

 

 

+100000000000000000000000000000000000

 

your f'ing knees will be toast

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The hardest part of installing it is getting the first row done. I live in an older house and the rooms are not completely square so we had to rip the first row so the boards were even when we got to the opposite wall. After that it is really easy. It was just measure, cut and snap together.

 

 

See, I have no idea what that means. :D

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i've installed it, the salesperson at home depot recommended we purchase there install video, it was helpful, also we paid about $25 bucks for the install kit, (some spacers, tapping block and another tool that i'm not sure what it was, but very helpful) there is lots of cutting and measuring, also not sure if it was needed or recommended but there is also a thin layer of underlay that goes down. honestly, with the right tools (skil-saw or similiar is the most important) it can be done.

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I'm not particularly handy and laid it down in my basement rec room.

 

Like jaxfactor says, unless you're a complete sped, most of the time the only person who'll notice your mistakes is you.

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See, I have no idea what that means. :D

 

 

 

Cutting it along the length of the boards to make it so that the first row is flush with the wall. If you layout the first row without cutting them you will see if you need to do this or not. If the entire row is against the wall you wont need to do this. If parts of the first row will be against the wall and other sections will be slightly away from the wall then you will need to do it.

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Just paid to have it installed in the living room, hallway and the kitchen. It looks great and I could of done it myself but I did enjoy drinking coffee and watching the wetbacks do it.

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I did enjoy drinking coffee and watching the wetbacks do it.

 

Hey now.... :D

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Just paid to have it installed in the living room, hallway and the kitchen. It looks great and I could of done it myself but I did enjoy drinking coffee and watching the wetbacks do it.

 

 

 

i sure hope they werent illegals!!!! :D

Edited by dmarc117

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See, I have no idea what that means. :D

 

 

 

Its all ball bearings these days..

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this link may help you

 

:D

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but there is also a thin layer of underlay that goes down.

 

 

Forgot about that. I did have the paste like stuff I had to put down before the actual flooring. That meant even more time on my knees. I don't know how the gheys do it. There are types where you don't have to put the underlay down. A talk with the Home Depot guy will answer that question for you. You may want to do what Darkside said and purchase a video. Try looking it up online first. I went in without any help but once you start going you get the hang of it. I have to do some real tiling in my bathroom. Looks like someone let their 3rd grader do it and I've neve gotten around to replacing it since I bought my house.

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I have to do some real tiling in my bathroom. Looks like someone let their 3rd grader do it and I've neve gotten around to replacing it since I bought my house.

 

My bathroom looks much the same.

 

The sad part is that I DID get around to replacing it. :D

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i think the plastic underlay only has to go down if your putting it on cement foundation.

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i think the plastic underlay only has to go down if your putting it on cement foundation.

 

 

Yep. After ripping up the old floor in the kitchen the floor was cement.

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This laminate has the attached underlayment, so that step's done. I actually ordered the video and the install kit from the company I got the flooring from (I had originally planned to do it myself). The video was absolutely useless to me. It may have been fantastic for a person who knows at all what they're doing, but it was all pops and buzzes to me.

I had all but decided to pay this cat to do it for me, but my backyard neighbor approached me today about splitting the cost of a privacy fence between our yards and that's an idea that's very appealing to me. :D

Edited by Big F'n Dave

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I'll be buying some of this in the next few weeks for the main level of my house. My wife has picked out some stuff that looks like tile. :D

 

I have not decided if I want to do the install myself. I'm not worried about actually doing it, as I have friends that have done it before. My problem is I don't really have time to do it. The laminate might sit in the boxes until I'm done with school - that'd make the Mrs. happy. :D

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I'll be buying some of this in the next few weeks for the main level of my house. My wife has picked out some stuff that looks like tile. :D

 

I have not decided if I want to do the install myself. I'm not worried about actually doing it, as I have friends that have done it before. My problem is I don't really have time to do it. The laminate might sit in the boxes until I'm done with school - that'd make the Mrs. happy. :tup:

 

 

Costco baby. Just grabbed a nice floor for about a buck a sq ft (with coupon, 24.99 for a box ~ 17.1 sqft). Made in America too if that is important. They have a dark almost cherry, oak and a light pattern. Very nice stuff, 25 year warranty and easy to put down. Matching 1/4 round and water seal is bought and shipped to you through an 800 number.

 

Dave - TRY IT! It is like a very easy puzzle. I don't know what you do for a living, but at the end of my day there is little to see for the effort. There are few things that are as satisfying as looking over the results of your labor. That what you have created. Every time you see it and walk on it there will be a sense of accomplishment.

 

Rather than pay to have someone do it, pay someone a lot less to teach you/help you put it in. Home Depot will probably have some guys standing outside that will be willing! :doh:

 

The big secret to doing it easy (I didn't the first time :D ) is to NOT pull off the base board. Just lay the floor up to the baseboard (about a 1/4 away) and nail in the quarter round along the edge of the wall after the floor is in.

 

I am sure that little of this makes sense if you are a novice at handymanning, but unless you have an area with a lot of angles and sh!t to cut around, this is one of the easier projects to learn on. Get some help, have a COUPLE brews and have fun!

 

If you are the type to get frustrated easily, PAY someone. Learning is cool, but you don't want to get frustrated and do a crappy job. It is not that hard, but there is a small learning curve. The hardest part is not making mental errors when cutting the boards at the end wall!

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If there is no padding under the boards, you will need to buy some. Basically, you take all the molding off the walls, start with a board near (not against) the wall (enough so the molding will cover the gap) and continue from there.

 

Most rip cuts are easy, measure and leave a little room for the floor to 'breathe', but make sure it's not so much that your molding will not cover it. You can always put quarter round down after the molding if you have gaps or just like the look.

 

Odd pieces are the fun part. Make sure you have a jig saw. In the case where you will have the edge that is cut exposed to the eye, go slow as cutting too fast can chip little pieces of the finish off the edges.

 

If you have bad knees, get some knee pads as suggested.

 

Also, on thing I found useful it to save small scrap pieces. Some boards will give you a fit going in, especially around doors and such. I would put a piece of scrap into the outer edge of the piece I was trying to get in and tap it with a hammer. That usually gets the good piece in and allows the scrap piece to take the damage from being hit with a hammer.

 

Good luck.

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