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A breakdown on which meats and what wood

 

Steak : Hickory

 

Chicken : Maple

 

Ribs : White Oak

 

Brisket : Wild Cherry

 

Fish : Apple, Peach or Alder

 

Pork : Apple, White Oak

 

"Smoke actually kills bacteria, they can't survive that environment"

 

 

found it in a Hy-vee add......... :D

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Just learned this yesterday. Carp: Walnut. Cook the carp on a slab of walnut for whatever your recipe calls for or how you're grilling it. When done, scrape the carp off and eat the wood. :D

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A breakdown on which meats and what wood

 

Steak : Hickory

 

Chicken : Maple

 

Ribs : White Oak

 

Brisket : Wild Cherry

 

Fish : Apple, Peach or Alder

 

Pork : Apple, White Oak

 

"Smoke actually kills bacteria, they can't survive that environment"

found it in a Hy-vee add......... :D

 

:tup:

 

Who the f'eats carp? :D

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My current girlfriend loves "morning wood" :D

 

 

goes good with crabs........ :D

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goes good with crabs........ :D

 

 

 

my "smoke" kills all bacteria :D

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Here is a list that gives hints as to which wood smokes what the best. This is not a complete list but should help with most general questions. Happy Q'ing.

 

ACACIA - these trees are in the same family as mesquite. When burned in a smoker, acacia has a flavor similar to mesquite but not quite as heavy. A very hot burning wood.

 

ALDER - Very delicate with a hint of sweetness. Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds.

 

ALMOND - A sweet smoke flavor, light ash. Good with all meats.

 

APPLE - Very mild with a subtle fruity flavor, slightly sweet. Good with poultry (turns skin dark brown) and pork.

 

ASH - Fast burner, light but distinctive flavor. Good with fish and red meats.

 

BIRCH - Medium-hard wood with a flavor similar to maple. Good with pork and poultry.

 

CHERRY - Mild and fruity. Good with poultry, pork and beef. Some List members say the cherry wood is the best wood for smoking. Wood from chokecherry trees may produce a bitter flavor.

 

COTTONWOOD - It is a softer wood than alder and very subtle in flavor. Use it for fuel but use some chunks of other woods (hickory, oak, pecan) for more flavor. Don't use green cottonwood for smoking.

 

CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.

 

GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.

 

HICKORY - Most commonly used wood for smoking--the King of smoking woods. Sweet to strong, heavy bacon flavor. Good with pork, ham and beef.

 

LILAC - Very light, subtle with a hint of floral. Good with seafood and lamb.

 

MAPLE - Smoky, mellow and slightly sweet. Good with pork, poultry, cheese, and small game birds.

 

MESQUITE - Strong earthy flavor. Good with beef, fish, chicken, and game. One of the hottest burning.

 

MULBERRY - The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple.

 

OAK - Heavy smoke flavor--the Queen of smoking wood. RED OAK is good on ribs, WHITE OAK makes the best coals for longer burning. All oak varieties reported as suitable for smoking. Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.

 

ORANGE, LEMON and GRAPEFRUIT - Produces a nice mild smoky flavor. Excellent with beef, pork, fish and poultry.

 

PEAR - A nice subtle smoke flavor. Much like apple. Excellent with chicken and pork.

 

PECAN - Sweet and mild with a flavor similar to hickory. Tasty with a subtle character. Good with poultry, beef, pork and cheese. Pecan is an all-around superior smoking wood.

 

SWEET FRUIT WOODS - APRICOT, PLUM, PEACH, NECTARINE - Great on most white or pink meats, including chicken, turkey, pork and fish. The flavor is milder and sweeter than hickory.

 

WALNUT - ENGLISH and BLACK - Very heavy smoke flavor, usually mixed with lighter woods like almond, pear or apple. Can be bitter if used alone. Good with red meats and game.

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Here is a list that gives hints as to which wood smokes what the best. This is not a complete list but should help with most general questions. Happy Q'ing.

 

ACACIA - these trees are in the same family as mesquite. When burned in a smoker, acacia has a flavor similar to mesquite but not quite as heavy. A very hot burning wood.

 

ALDER - Very delicate with a hint of sweetness. Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds.

 

ALMOND - A sweet smoke flavor, light ash. Good with all meats.

 

APPLE - Very mild with a subtle fruity flavor, slightly sweet. Good with poultry (turns skin dark brown) and pork.

 

ASH - Fast burner, light but distinctive flavor. Good with fish and red meats.

 

BIRCH - Medium-hard wood with a flavor similar to maple. Good with pork and poultry.

 

CHERRY - Mild and fruity. Good with poultry, pork and beef. Some List members say the cherry wood is the best wood for smoking. Wood from chokecherry trees may produce a bitter flavor.

 

COTTONWOOD - It is a softer wood than alder and very subtle in flavor. Use it for fuel but use some chunks of other woods (hickory, oak, pecan) for more flavor. Don't use green cottonwood for smoking.

 

CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.

 

GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.

 

HICKORY - Most commonly used wood for smoking--the King of smoking woods. Sweet to strong, heavy bacon flavor. Good with pork, ham and beef.

 

LILAC - Very light, subtle with a hint of floral. Good with seafood and lamb.

 

MAPLE - Smoky, mellow and slightly sweet. Good with pork, poultry, cheese, and small game birds.

 

MESQUITE - Strong earthy flavor. Good with beef, fish, chicken, and game. One of the hottest burning.

 

MULBERRY - The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple.

 

OAK - Heavy smoke flavor--the Queen of smoking wood. RED OAK is good on ribs, WHITE OAK makes the best coals for longer burning. All oak varieties reported as suitable for smoking. Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.

 

ORANGE, LEMON and GRAPEFRUIT - Produces a nice mild smoky flavor. Excellent with beef, pork, fish and poultry.

 

PEAR - A nice subtle smoke flavor. Much like apple. Excellent with chicken and pork.

 

PECAN - Sweet and mild with a flavor similar to hickory. Tasty with a subtle character. Good with poultry, beef, pork and cheese. Pecan is an all-around superior smoking wood.

 

SWEET FRUIT WOODS - APRICOT, PLUM, PEACH, NECTARINE - Great on most white or pink meats, including chicken, turkey, pork and fish. The flavor is milder and sweeter than hickory.

 

WALNUT - ENGLISH and BLACK - Very heavy smoke flavor, usually mixed with lighter woods like almond, pear or apple. Can be bitter if used alone. Good with red meats and game.

 

 

:D .......Nice WOOD list............. :tup: ........... :D

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:D .......Nice WOOD list............. :tup: ........... :D

 

 

that's not the first time I heard that, cowboy

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:D

 

Who the f'eats carp? :D

 

 

Drive anywhere on North Grand Ave. All my brothers love it. :tup:

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Mesquite,mmm,mmmm good!

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Europeans love carp. So do the slavs and Baltic states people. I've never tried it myself, but there is one lake nearby that has an incredibly large carp population, and I've never been there when there weren't at least 4 or 5 guys speaking other than english fishing for them from the bank. Carp are tough to catch, although they can get huge (20 to 40 pounders not unusual), they have very small mouths. They drop a bait as soon as they feel the slightest pull. Tough fish to get a hook set on.

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Europeans love carp. So do the slavs and Baltic states people. I've never tried it myself, but there is one lake nearby that has an incredibly large carp population, and I've never been there when there weren't at least 4 or 5 guys speaking other than english fishing for them from the bank. Carp are tough to catch, although they can get huge (20 to 40 pounders not unusual), they have very small mouths. They drop a bait as soon as they feel the slightest pull. Tough fish to get a hook set on.

 

 

I prefer to fish for carp with my bow and arrow! You don't have to worry about them taking the bait and they are easier to "reel in" with an arrow stuck in them. I have never eaten them but have been known to cut them up for bait.

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Bow fishing for carp is popular in upstate NY. I saw one guy snag a 65 pounder. They just cruise around on top of the water.... easy pickins.

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Bow fishing for carp is popular in upstate NY. I saw one guy snag a 65 pounder. They just cruise around on top of the water.... easy pickins.

 

Yeah, I head down to the Japanese restuarant where they have a Koi pool and shoot away. Granted it's in a strip mall but it's easy game.

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Here is a list that gives hints as to which wood smokes what the best. This is not a complete list but should help with most general questions. Happy Q'ing.

 

ACACIA - these trees are in the same family as mesquite. When burned in a smoker, acacia has a flavor similar to mesquite but not quite as heavy. A very hot burning wood.

 

ALDER - Very delicate with a hint of sweetness. Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds.

 

ALMOND - A sweet smoke flavor, light ash. Good with all meats.

 

APPLE - Very mild with a subtle fruity flavor, slightly sweet. Good with poultry (turns skin dark brown) and pork.

 

ASH - Fast burner, light but distinctive flavor. Good with fish and red meats.

 

BIRCH - Medium-hard wood with a flavor similar to maple. Good with pork and poultry.

 

CHERRY - Mild and fruity. Good with poultry, pork and beef. Some List members say the cherry wood is the best wood for smoking. Wood from chokecherry trees may produce a bitter flavor.

 

COTTONWOOD - It is a softer wood than alder and very subtle in flavor. Use it for fuel but use some chunks of other woods (hickory, oak, pecan) for more flavor. Don't use green cottonwood for smoking.

 

CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.

 

GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.

 

HICKORY - Most commonly used wood for smoking--the King of smoking woods. Sweet to strong, heavy bacon flavor. Good with pork, ham and beef.

 

LILAC - Very light, subtle with a hint of floral. Good with seafood and lamb.

 

MAPLE - Smoky, mellow and slightly sweet. Good with pork, poultry, cheese, and small game birds.

 

MESQUITE - Strong earthy flavor. Good with beef, fish, chicken, and game. One of the hottest burning.

 

MULBERRY - The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple.

 

OAK - Heavy smoke flavor--the Queen of smoking wood. RED OAK is good on ribs, WHITE OAK makes the best coals for longer burning. All oak varieties reported as suitable for smoking. Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.

 

ORANGE, LEMON and GRAPEFRUIT - Produces a nice mild smoky flavor. Excellent with beef, pork, fish and poultry.

 

PEAR - A nice subtle smoke flavor. Much like apple. Excellent with chicken and pork.

 

PECAN - Sweet and mild with a flavor similar to hickory. Tasty with a subtle character. Good with poultry, beef, pork and cheese. Pecan is an all-around superior smoking wood.

 

SWEET FRUIT WOODS - APRICOT, PLUM, PEACH, NECTARINE - Great on most white or pink meats, including chicken, turkey, pork and fish. The flavor is milder and sweeter than hickory.

 

WALNUT - ENGLISH and BLACK - Very heavy smoke flavor, usually mixed with lighter woods like almond, pear or apple. Can be bitter if used alone. Good with red meats and game.

 

i'm bumping this because i smoked our christmas turkey with pecan wood and it was awesome. i refer to this list all the time to try out new woods. :D

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For what it's worth, since I have been living in Germany over the past few months, I have become very fond of Black-Forest ham (in particular, the thin-sliced smoked "Schwarzwald Schinken" --think "prosciutto" only better). It is smoked over "tannenwood" (i.e. fir).

 

I'm not sure how you can utilize fir (or pine) wood into your own recipes, but I thought I would throw it out there in case anybody wanted to experiment.

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For what it's worth, since I have been living in Germany over the past few months, I have become very fond of Black-Forest ham (in particular, the thin-sliced smoked "Schwarzwald Schinken" --think "prosciutto" only better). It is smoked over "tannenwood" (i.e. fir).

 

I'm not sure how you can utilize fir (or pine) wood into your own recipes, but I thought I would throw it out there in case anybody wanted to experiment.

 

sht I threw out the Christmas tree last week

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