Crazysight

Vick is all done

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geez, that may be a bit overboard . . .

I agree, Mr Portis! :D

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:D He's done. the new commish has a definite plan for the league, and it's been VERY apparent throughout his decisions and disciplinary actions thus far. Vick is as dead as one of his dogs...

Goodell just can't suspend someone just because they're a nasty person. The players union won't stand up to it, and Goodell would be hearing from Vicks lawyers as well. The only way we see a suspension is if and when he loses in court.

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Goodell just can't suspend someone just because they're a nasty person. The players union won't stand up to it, and Goodell would be hearing from Vicks lawyers as well. The only way we see a suspension is if and when he loses in court.

 

Tell that to Pacman Jones. :D

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Hmmm...just go to the Panthers Homepage and listen to the interview with Goodell and then re-think that question. It's in the media/video thingee.

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The remains of 37 dog carcasses being found, was only reported by one media source, a local station WVEC-TV. The story by WVEC-TV was then re-broadcast by other major media outlets.

WVEC-TV has since pulled that story.

 

Fixed in the interests of accuracy, but I completely agree with your point. I don't see "Piano Boy" as an upgrade to Schaub.

 

However, Schaub would've been an UFA next year & likely too expensive to keep. So regardless of how this Vick dog fighting disaster plays out, trading Schaub now & getting what they got, was the right thing to do. I do think the Falcons could've done better @ back up QB though.

 

 

 

Okay, didn't hear the story was pulled.

 

It was McKay's idea to trade Schaub? Gotcha.' I just assumed the new head coach had a hand in it with the owner's blessing.

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To LaDainian Tomlinson, the pit bull is a term of endearment. He named his “Sweetness,” in tribute to Walter Payton, and he celebrates the breed in his Chargers locker with a ceramic bust that bears his No. 21.

 

“To me, a pit bull reminds me of a running back in a lot of ways,” Tomlinson said yesterday afternoon. “They can be great, sweet dogs, and they can be aggressive. They're nice-looking . . . muscular, big heads, strong and fast.”

 

They're just like running backs, right up until you try to pry their jaws apart.

 

As a football icon familiar with both the breed and the dogfighting milieu, Tomlinson has an interest in the Michael Vick investigation that exceeds idle curiosity. Though LT said yesterday he had not attended a dogfight in years – maybe not since junior high school – they were a common diversion during the Texas boyhood of the NFL's Most Valuable Player.

 

 

“In the country it's very common,” Tomlinson said. “Guys have a tendency to get involved with it because it's gambling, like shooting dice or being at the poker table. It's just another way that guys can gamble. Some guys would do it just to say they had the baddest dog. Saturday night, you'd go to a place or somebody's back yard. There would be a lot of guys around.”

Tomlinson says he lacked the means to get involved in the gambling as an adolescent, and he never did develop much of a taste for canine combat.

 

“It's kind of like an (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fight almost, until someone gets hurt, you know what I mean?” Tomlinson said between minicamp workouts at the Chargers' complex. “So the initial deal is like, 'Oh, my God, look at that!' because it's an incredible thing to look at. Then something goes wrong or one of the dogs dies and your heart goes out to them – just like it was a natural fight. It's a tough thing to look at.

 

“I understand what it's about, but I would never do it. I couldn't see my dog fighting to death, and that's what happens most of the time. When those dogs lock on, it's to death. I could never see myself fighting my dog to death.”

 

Unlike Redskins lunkhead Clinton Portis, Tomlinson fully understands what all the fuss is about, why dogfighting is anathema to the animal rights activists, why the NFL has denounced the practice as “cruel, degrading and illegal” and why it's a felony in 48 states.

 

Unlike the mercurial Vick, whose career continues to unfold as a road map to regret, LT has figured out where false steps lead. If the careers of these two players are forever linked because of the 2001 trade that determined their draft fates, their paths have not run parallel for several seasons.

 

While Tomlinson has embodied class and dignity during a career of Hall of Fame caliber, Atlanta's gifted quarterback has become a magnet for negative news. In the last 14 months, Vick settled a lawsuit with a woman who alleged he had knowingly given her herpes, gestured obscenely at Falcons fans, been detained at Miami International Airport because of drug suspicions and been classified as a “coach killer” by the father of his (then) coach, Jim Mora.

 

And now this. Though Vick has yet to be charged for the dogfighting evidence found on a property he owns, though a local prosecutor has hinted at a racial agenda in the federal investigation, and though one of Vick's cousins says, “Everything going on is really my fault,” the damage to Vick's image is likely irreparable.

 

An unnamed police informant has identified Vick as “one of the heavyweights” in an interview with ESPN. Even if Vick's involvement is indirect, Tomlinson believes he should have known better.

 

“You know it's a felony,” Tomlinson said. “The things that are going on now with animal rights people, they protect animals. And they should. So someone of (Vick's) stature, there's no question he has to stay clear from it.

 

“It's a very tough deal that Vick is in. I feel like maybe at times you think (something) is not really bad till something happens. Then, oh my goodness, people are making a big deal out of it.”

 

When an athlete attains the level of fame of a Michael Vick or a LaDainian Tomlinson, the most trivial matters can become a big deal in an eye-blink. Superstars usually develop an instinct for con men, leeches and trouble-prone companions, but some of them never learn to exercise the appropriate amount of caution.

 

“There are all kinds of scams that people try to pull on you,” Tomlinson said. “A while ago there was a girl who said I got her pregnant when I was in high school. I didn't know who the girl was. She claimed I had a 10-year-old son.

 

“Stuff like that happens. There are people coming at you wanting you to put your money in certain things that you know aren't right. Why get involved in something like that? It's just not worth it.”

 

LaDainian Tomlinson says he has been sufficiently enriched by football to resist “wasting my money” on gambling. Neither is he inclined to place his reputation at risk. When it comes to character, he hangs on like a pit bull.

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To LaDainian Tomlinson, the pit bull is a term of endearment. He named his “Sweetness,” in tribute to Walter Payton, and he celebrates the breed in his Chargers locker with a ceramic bust that bears his No. 21.

 

“To me, a pit bull reminds me of a running back in a lot of ways,” Tomlinson said yesterday afternoon. “They can be great, sweet dogs, and they can be aggressive. They're nice-looking . . . muscular, big heads, strong and fast.”

 

They're just like running backs, right up until you try to pry their jaws apart.

 

As a football icon familiar with both the breed and the dogfighting milieu, Tomlinson has an interest in the Michael Vick investigation that exceeds idle curiosity. Though LT said yesterday he had not attended a dogfight in years – maybe not since junior high school – they were a common diversion during the Texas boyhood of the NFL's Most Valuable Player.

“In the country it's very common,” Tomlinson said. “Guys have a tendency to get involved with it because it's gambling, like shooting dice or being at the poker table. It's just another way that guys can gamble. Some guys would do it just to say they had the baddest dog. Saturday night, you'd go to a place or somebody's back yard. There would be a lot of guys around.”

Tomlinson says he lacked the means to get involved in the gambling as an adolescent, and he never did develop much of a taste for canine combat.

 

“It's kind of like an (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fight almost, until someone gets hurt, you know what I mean?” Tomlinson said between minicamp workouts at the Chargers' complex. “So the initial deal is like, 'Oh, my God, look at that!' because it's an incredible thing to look at. Then something goes wrong or one of the dogs dies and your heart goes out to them – just like it was a natural fight. It's a tough thing to look at.

 

“I understand what it's about, but I would never do it. I couldn't see my dog fighting to death, and that's what happens most of the time. When those dogs lock on, it's to death. I could never see myself fighting my dog to death.”

 

Unlike Redskins lunkhead Clinton Portis, Tomlinson fully understands what all the fuss is about, why dogfighting is anathema to the animal rights activists, why the NFL has denounced the practice as “cruel, degrading and illegal” and why it's a felony in 48 states.

 

Unlike the mercurial Vick, whose career continues to unfold as a road map to regret, LT has figured out where false steps lead. If the careers of these two players are forever linked because of the 2001 trade that determined their draft fates, their paths have not run parallel for several seasons.

 

While Tomlinson has embodied class and dignity during a career of Hall of Fame caliber, Atlanta's gifted quarterback has become a magnet for negative news. In the last 14 months, Vick settled a lawsuit with a woman who alleged he had knowingly given her herpes, gestured obscenely at Falcons fans, been detained at Miami International Airport because of drug suspicions and been classified as a “coach killer” by the father of his (then) coach, Jim Mora.

 

And now this. Though Vick has yet to be charged for the dogfighting evidence found on a property he owns, though a local prosecutor has hinted at a racial agenda in the federal investigation, and though one of Vick's cousins says, “Everything going on is really my fault,” the damage to Vick's image is likely irreparable.

 

An unnamed police informant has identified Vick as “one of the heavyweights” in an interview with ESPN. Even if Vick's involvement is indirect, Tomlinson believes he should have known better.

 

“You know it's a felony,” Tomlinson said. “The things that are going on now with animal rights people, they protect animals. And they should. So someone of (Vick's) stature, there's no question he has to stay clear from it.

 

“It's a very tough deal that Vick is in. I feel like maybe at times you think (something) is not really bad till something happens. Then, oh my goodness, people are making a big deal out of it.”

 

When an athlete attains the level of fame of a Michael Vick or a LaDainian Tomlinson, the most trivial matters can become a big deal in an eye-blink. Superstars usually develop an instinct for con men, leeches and trouble-prone companions, but some of them never learn to exercise the appropriate amount of caution.

 

“There are all kinds of scams that people try to pull on you,” Tomlinson said. “A while ago there was a girl who said I got her pregnant when I was in high school. I didn't know who the girl was. She claimed I had a 10-year-old son.

 

“Stuff like that happens. There are people coming at you wanting you to put your money in certain things that you know aren't right. Why get involved in something like that? It's just not worth it.”

 

LaDainian Tomlinson says he has been sufficiently enriched by football to resist “wasting my money” on gambling. Neither is he inclined to place his reputation at risk. When it comes to character, he hangs on like a pit bull.

 

 

Who wrote that?

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Eariler in this thread, I've seen it mentioned that Vick may have been brought up in a world that believes that there is nothing wrong with dog-fighting. I have to admit that it brought back something that I remembered as a child and hadn't really thought about it much, but with all the attention that this has gathered, I find myself thinking about it more and more.

 

I live in northern Texas, quite near the Oklahoma border. As a child, until I was around say 8 or so, my Grandfather used to take my 2 cousins and I across to Oklahoma to attend cock-fights that his brother would have birds in. I hadn't even thought about it except occasionally over the years until this whole story came out. I remember how they used to have metal spurs they would add on the chickens' legs to increase the amount of damage they could do to each other. I also remember seeing a trash barrel (the kind you usually see people burning trash in, metal with holes in the bottom to allow for more air flow to create a good burn) with several dead birds in it.

 

I find animal fighting, in general, to be a repulsive activity. I do own a Great Dane, Orion, that is a loving and great companion to my wife and I and our 3 daughters. But, when I remember back to those cockfights, I remember there being at least a couple hundred people at some of these fights. It makes me wonder if I had continued to go as I got older, would I have grown accustomed to the fights and found that there wasn't anything actually wrong with it? Which side of the fence would I have been on? Just makes me wonder is all. I don't defend/condone any animal fighting and anyone who believes this post is to that effect is wrong or maybe I just haven't worded it well. So just let me get that out now, I don't like it and don't condone anyone doing it.

 

My grandfather's brother was still breeding fighting roosters when he died somewhere back in the mid 90's. I even remember him being sentenced to 30 days in jail for having an owl trap on a pole in his yard. Owls are protected around here and he had some coming in and killing his rooster's while they were staked in the yard. You see, just like the dogs, he couldn't put them in a coup together, they had their own little house with a pole driven a few feet away and they were tethered to that pole.

 

Sorry this post is so long, but I thought I'd share that there is a culture of cockfighting/dogfighting out there. If you feel the need to flame, go ahead I guess, but having seen things from my perspective I can see how people could believe it to be no crime. But having seen what the fights do to the birds, I'm not sure how those same people can't see that it is morally wrong.

 

 

While this may help us understand Vick's attitude it does not excuse it.

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Eariler in this thread, I've seen it mentioned that Vick may have been brought up in a world that believes that there is nothing wrong with dog-fighting. I have to admit that it brought back something that I remembered as a child and hadn't really thought about it much, but with all the attention that this has gathered, I find myself thinking about it more and more.

 

I live in northern Texas, quite near the Oklahoma border. As a child, until I was around say 8 or so, my Grandfather used to take my 2 cousins and I across to Oklahoma to attend cock-fights that his brother would have birds in. I hadn't even thought about it except occasionally over the years until this whole story came out. I remember how they used to have metal spurs they would add on the chickens' legs to increase the amount of damage they could do to each other. I also remember seeing a trash barrel (the kind you usually see people burning trash in, metal with holes in the bottom to allow for more air flow to create a good burn) with several dead birds in it.

 

I find animal fighting, in general, to be a repulsive activity. I do own a Great Dane, Orion, that is a loving and great companion to my wife and I and our 3 daughters. But, when I remember back to those cockfights, I remember there being at least a couple hundred people at some of these fights. It makes me wonder if I had continued to go as I got older, would I have grown accustomed to the fights and found that there wasn't anything actually wrong with it? Which side of the fence would I have been on? Just makes me wonder is all. I don't defend/condone any animal fighting and anyone who believes this post is to that effect is wrong or maybe I just haven't worded it well. So just let me get that out now, I don't like it and don't condone anyone doing it.

 

My grandfather's brother was still breeding fighting roosters when he died somewhere back in the mid 90's. I even remember him being sentenced to 30 days in jail for having an owl trap on a pole in his yard. Owls are protected around here and he had some coming in and killing his rooster's while they were staked in the yard. You see, just like the dogs, he couldn't put them in a coup together, they had their own little house with a pole driven a few feet away and they were tethered to that pole.

 

Sorry this post is so long, but I thought I'd share that there is a culture of cockfighting/dogfighting out there. If you feel the need to flame, go ahead I guess, but having seen things from my perspective I can see how people could believe it to be no crime. But having seen what the fights do to the birds, I'm not sure how those same people can't see that it is morally wrong.

 

 

Very interesting story and I applaud you for sharing that.

 

There are many things that happen in the world that are known to be illegal yet people do it because they were brought up that way and with those ideas full-flowing.

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Just so I have it straight.

 

Mike Vick has a passionate hobby, dog breeding. He is so passionate about the hobby that he obtains a license, purchases a half a million dollar piece of property that is furnished with big screen plasma T.V.'s and $17,000.00 couches for his comfort. He sets up a web site, or more likely pays to have it done, and then he never goes to the property purchased specifically for his passionate hobby.

 

Now the operation is a breeding operation, or so we are told, so we expect to find certain things. Certainly a legitmate breeding operation will have records of bloodlines, records of health and shots, kennels, areas to acclimatize puppies to humans, puppy chow and inoculation records, and most importantly a plethora of females of breeding age. After all one or two sires can effectively impregnate dozens of females. Hell it could even be done with straws of semen.

 

From what I understand these items, excepting a rape stand which would indicate some breeding may have taken place there(or which might have been nothing more than a handy restraint for vicious beasts in general), were generally, even conspicuously, not found. Rather items accompanying fighting operations were. Well this is starting to sound rather fishy to me. From what I gather we had an unususal number of males of fighting age and few females and no puppies that I know of, of course our information is sketchy

 

Now I know the legal system presupposes his innocence, and allows him the right to remain silent, yet I have never seen an innocent man, or even a guilty one with a palbable concocted story, not try to get out in front of the story and try the matter in the press. Of course maybe I'm again jumping to conclusions.

 

Next we have some people coming forward, at least to authorities if not yet to the press. These are often people of shady associations themselves as would of course be the case in an illegal subculture. Maybe they should be ignored because of their shady past, or maybe their stories will make more sense than the incredible crock Vick has tried to sell about his passionate hobby that costs him hundreds of thousands but in which he has never had any hand whatsoever.

 

Now the feds are involved. They got involved after they had a chance to carefully evaluate the evidence so far. If this looked like a hummer, a jackpot of stupidity that could ruin careers by coming up false, they could have avoided the whole mess. Instead they are in. Not only that they have taken the matter to a judge who has reviewed their evidence and who has issued a warrant. Now it seems that the warrant was productive as we know some items were removed from the property. Precisely what, and how many can only be speculated upon at this time as the Feds are not trying the matter in the press, a responsible stance.

 

 

When I put this together I get a very negative jackpot for Mr. Vick. Yes I get that some can hold on to the salve of his legal presumptions which control only legal proceedings. I would note, however, that there is no legal presumption that prohibits me from thinking or drawing conclusions. I have done so, and I am pretty comfortable with my conclusions. Of course I would, because of my conclusions, never get to be on his jury absent an ability to put my conclusions aside, but I have made my conclusions nonetheless. Michael Vick is pissing down peoples legs and asking them to think it's raining.

Edited by Ditkaless Wonders

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Is Dog fighting a federal offense?

 

 

Probably willl go more with the racateering and gambling offenses. Maybe, depending on what they find, a RICO violation? :D:tup: His life as he knows it could be done, forget about football! :D

 

I saw your take on the dog fighting and don't dissagree. But as PC as this is animal thingy is now (HE[[ , these goobs are trying to get Dodger Dogs out of the ravine) , it makes it a touchy feely issue as well.

 

My feeling is he is going down for something. But we thought the same for OJ too!?!?!? :doh:

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He's the most exciting player in the league.

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Just so I have it straight.

 

Mike Vick has a passionate hobby, dog breeding. He is so passionate about the hobby that he obtains a license, purchases a half a million dollar piece of property that is furnished with big screen plasma T.V.'s and $17,000.00 couches for his comfort. He sets up a web site, or more likely pays to have it done, and then he never goes to the property purchased specifically for his passionate hobby.

 

Now the operation is a breeding operation, or so we are told, so we expect to find certain things. Certainly a legitmate breeding operation will have records of bloodlines, records of health and shots, kennels, areas to acclimatize puppies to humans, puppy chow and inoculation records, and most importantly a plethora of females of breeding age. After all one or two sires can effectively impregnate dozens of females. Hell it could even be done with straws of semen.

 

From what I understand these items, excepting a rape stand which would indicate some breeding may have taken place there(or which might have been nothing more than a handy restraint for vicious beasts in general), were generally, even conspicuously, not found. Rather items accompanying fighting operations were. Well this is starting to sound rather fishy to me. From what I gather we had an unususal number of males of fighting age and few females and no puppies that I know of, of course our information is sketchy

 

Now I know the legal system presupposes his innocence, and allows him the right to remain silent, yet I have never seen an innocent man, or even a guilty one with a palbable concocted story, not try to get out in front of the story and try the matter in the press. Of course maybe I'm again jumping to conclusions.

 

Next we have some people coming forward, at least to authorities if not yet to the press. These are often people of shady associations themselves as would of course be the case in an illegal subculture. Maybe they should be ignored because of their shady past, or maybe their stories will make more sense than the incredible crock Vick has tried to sell about his passionate hobby that costs him hundreds of thousands but in which he has never had any hand whatsoever.

 

Now the feds are involved. They got involved after they had a chance to carefully evaluate the evidence so far. If this looked like a hummer, a jackpot of stupidity that could ruin careers by coming up false, they could have avoided the whole mess. Instead they are in. Not only that they have taken the matter to a judge who has reviewed their evidence and who has issued a warrant. Now it seems that the warrant was productive as we know some items were removed from the property. Precisely what, and how many can only be speculated upon at this time as the Feds are not trying the matter in the press, a responsible stance.

When I put this together I get a very negative jackpot for Mr. Vick. Yes I get that some can hold on to the salve of his legal presumptions which control only legal proceedings. I would note, however, that there is no legal presumption that prohibits me from thinking or drawing conclusions. I have done so, and I am pretty comfortable with my conclusions. Of course I would, because of my conclusions, never get to be on his jury absent an ability to put my conclusions aside, but I have made my conclusions nonetheless. Michael Vick is pissing down peoples legs and asking them to think it's raining.

 

 

 

I think you missed the part where he sold the property in one day for less than half of its value to a still unknown party - despite home sales being in the domain of public knowledge - and then that home being burglarized shortly after the sale and items that mysteriously get taken are items that have great value but also items that could hold bits of evidence - 2 floor buffers, a wet vac, a washer, and a dryer. You know, the types of things that all theives case homes for.

 

But otherwise I think you summed it up very nicely.

 

I'm surprised given your position that you also didn't address Poindexter's complete bungling of this case - almost to the point of trying to circumvent any legl action against Vick.

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I think you missed the part where he sold the property in one day for less than half of its value to a still unknown party - despite home sales being in the domain of public knowledge - and then that home being burglarized shortly after the sale and items that mysteriously get taken are items that have great value but also items that could hold bits of evidence - 2 floor buffers, a wet vac, a washer, and a dryer. You know, the types of things that all theives case homes for.

 

But otherwise I think you summed it up very nicely.

 

I'm surprised given your position that you also didn't address Poindexter's complete bungling of this case - almost to the point of trying to circumvent any legl action against Vick.

 

Good stuff. Unfortunately all circumstantial at best. Gotta believe there is some level of authority at work here - Vick doesn't have the smarts to sell the house and arrange the burglary in that time frame.

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Good stuff. Unfortunately all circumstantial at best. Gotta believe there is some level of authority at work here - Vick doesn't have the smarts to sell the house and arrange the burglary in that time frame.

 

 

People get convicted on the strength of circumstantial evidence.

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While this may help us understand Vick's attitude it does not excuse it.

 

100% agree.

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People get convicted on the strength of circumstantial evidence.

 

I don't know if it's even circumstantial from an evidential point of view. Suspicious - absolutely. Admissible? Probably not.

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Doesnt TimC live in Richmond? :D

 

 

 

close enough he can almost spit on richmond

 

 

 

Or burn it down, if need be. :D

 

I haven't read the thread but Vick has been trouble his whole life. The guy has always been a thug and played the innocent card (as opposed to the race card) since he was a High School phenom down at Virginia Beach. I say let him burn.

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I think you missed the part where he sold the property in one day for less than half of its value to a still unknown party - despite home sales being in the domain of public knowledge

#1 What is known, is what the property initially listed for.

Common practice for Realtors to list a house below market value to get offers quickly coming in. Unheard of for a property listed at half it's value, to actually sell at that initial list price.

What is unknown, is what $$$ was actually accepted.

 

#2 A Rotoworld post says Vick still owns the property as the search warrants were made out for the property owner - Michael Vick. Apparently the sale didn't go through.

- and then that home being burglarized shortly after the sale and items that mysteriously get taken are items that have great value but also items that could hold bits of evidence - 2 floor buffers, a wet vac, a washer, and a dryer. You know, the types of things that all thieves case homes for.

Thieves will steal ANYTHING not nailed down. Fridges, stoves etc... You name it, if they can pawn it, they'll steal it.

In fact some thieves even take the time to get stuff that is nailed down (sinks, vanities, garage doors etc...) if they're robbing a secluded empty house separated by several acres from it's nearest neighbor. These thieves were obviously didn't bring a big enough truck though.

 

Considering the shop vac, buffer & washer/dryer were not seized as evidence like the carpet, treadmill, break stick were & it's dead easy to tell if there's blood remnants on any item with a simple chemical spray, they were obviously clean.

 

But it does sound good to say some of the items stolen could hold evidence.

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Considering the shop vac, buffer & washer/dryer were not seized as evidence like the carpet, treadmill, break stick were & it's dead easy to tell if there's blood remnants on any item with a simple chemical spray, they were obviously clean.

 

I don't think it is obvious. Whether intentional or not, people bungle investigations and/or miss evidence all of the time.

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I don't think it is obvious. Whether intentional or not, people bungle investigations and/or miss evidence all of the time.

Considering you had the very Gung Ho Kathy Strouse (part of the Virgina Dog Fighting Task Force) working the investigation & the first words out of her mouth were "We've got him. We've got Michael Vick", I would say there's about a .01% chance she missed spraying those obvious cleaning items for blood.

 

Even if this highly motivated person did miss it, not sure how any of the othermultiple authorities involved, from the local yokels, to the Dept of Ag officers, to the initial drug raid task, force failed to check completely obvious cleaning items.

 

If these multiple sets of authorities ALL failed to check the items which were laying around for all to see, then they need to ALL be fired for gross dereliction of duty & supreme incompetence.

 

But it certainly plays well to speculate that all of these myraid authoritive bodies each independtly missed checking these obvious cleaning items & then further speculate that said items indeed held key evidence.

 

Lot of speculating going on, but hey, whatever floats the boat.

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This is really sad to read:

 

(Rotoworld) The remains of nearly three dozen dogs were found on the property formerly owned by Michael Vick in Surry County, Virginia.Impact: Two investigations are now taking place, one by local authorities and one by the feds. The federal part of the investigation is expected to pursue charges against Vick. Local investigators may end up bowing out.

 

What's the source for this? :D

 

Rotoworld's link is here... which says remains were found. If you click the link for the source they cite (WVEC in Virginia) here... it's just a blurb about the local county prosecutor and his comment about the search.

 

By the way... the local stations in Virginia have proved to be terrible sources while covering the ordeal. I don't know how many times when reading updates that the information cited by the VA local stations was just taken out of context or just completely unreliable (i.e. on the face of some of the local stations' info it would be VERY newsworthy but it was never picked up by national sources b/c either it was out of context, false, or unreliable).

 

EDIT: Also, here's a link to WVEC's main football news page... click. No mention or headline of remains being found. I'm not trying to defend Vick here or anything but there's been 7 pages over this and I can't find one corroborating source including any info from the ORIGINAL source.

 

They may have or may find remains. I don't know... but local news stations, especially small markets will say and print almost anything from anyone that phones in.

Edited by kingfish247

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Considering you had the very Gung Ho Kathy Strouse (part of the Virgina Dog Fighting Task Force) working the investigation & the first words out of her mouth were "We've got him. We've got Michael Vick", I would say there's about a .01% chance she missed spraying those obvious cleaning items for blood.

 

Even if this highly motivated person did miss it, not sure how any of the othermultiple authorities involved, from the local yokels, to the Dept of Ag officers, to the initial drug raid task, force failed to check completely obvious cleaning items.

 

If these multiple sets of authorities ALL failed to check the items which were laying around for all to see, then they need to ALL be fired for gross dereliction of duty & supreme incompetence.

 

But it certainly plays well to speculate that all of these myraid authoritive bodies each independtly missed checking these obvious cleaning items & then further speculate that said items indeed held key evidence.

 

Lot of speculating going on, but hey, whatever floats the boat.

 

 

 

Actually the original warrant, and therefore investigation, went to drug related activity. That is what the were authorized to search for. When they saw direct evidence of animal endangerment they were authorized to address that which was in plain sight, but no more. They never did a search for evidence of the animal related charges as that would have exceeded their warrant. That was why it was important for Poindexter to execute the subsequent search. When he did not the Feds stepped in. Evanescent evidence was allowed to remain under the custody and control of the accused for far too long. This failure was shameful and speaks, along with Poindexters comments impugning the Feds as racists, of Poindexters gross negligence in the matter or perhaps something darker still than mere incompetence.

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