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detlef

Have I mentioned how good hanger steak is lately?

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Well, it's freaking delicious and I might go so far as to say that it may be my favorite regardless of price. That says a lot because it's cheaper than every single steak of consequence. If you factor goodness vs price, than there is simply no competition.

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Well, it's freaking delicious and I might go so far as to say that it may be my favorite regardless of price. That says a lot because it's cheaper than every single steak of consequence. If you factor goodness vs price, than there is simply no competition.

 

Dude, I hear you. Had some for dinner last night, again and it was as tasty as ever. God I love that stuff.

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Dude, I hear you. Had some for dinner last night, again and it was as tasty as ever. God I love that stuff.

 

Wow, you too? Serious desert island food for me.

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Dude, I hear you. Had some for dinner last night, again and it was as tasty as ever. God I love that stuff.

 

 

How do you prepare it? I'm always interested in a Sirloin meal at a Chuck Roast price. . .

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Define "hanger steak" please.

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I had hanger steak last week at a restaurant. Top notch. :D

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had some at the Eggtoberfest down in Atlanta last October. Damn fine piece of meat. Only one per cow or so I'm told.

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Define "hanger steak" please.

 

It is also referred to as the hanging tender. It is basically a flap of meat that hangs below the tenderloin area of the cow. It is two thin (10-16 oz), striated (like skirt or flank) steaks with a sheet of silverskin between them. If you buy them whole, you need to carefully separate them from this layer of silver skin.

 

When you cook them, make sure you don't go past MR because it is somewhat lean. Also, the grain is very coarse and be sure to slice against it. You'll need to basically slice it on the bias along the length of the steak.

 

At Jujube, we marinate them with fish sauce, sweet chili, and lemongrass before grilling them, slicing them and serving them with a cucumber salad and peanut sauce on the side.

 

You'll need to find a good butcher to bring some into for you. I pay less than $3/lb uncleaned and likely get about 90% yield after trimming. Once you get good at it, you can clean them pretty quickly.

 

Cleaned at a higher end butcher's shop, you could expect to pay as much as $8/lb. However, that's still cheaper than most of the other steaks and twice as good as flank or skirt.

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It is also referred to as the hanging tender. It is basically a flap of meat that hangs below the tenderloin area of the cow. It is two thin (10-16 oz), striated (like skirt or flank) steaks with a sheet of silverskin between them. If you buy them whole, you need to carefully separate them from this layer of silver skin.

 

When you cook them, make sure you don't go past MR because it is somewhat lean. Also, the grain is very coarse and be sure to slice against it. You'll need to basically slice it on the bias along the length of the steak.

 

At Jujube, we marinate them with fish sauce, sweet chili, and lemongrass before grilling them, slicing them and serving them with a cucumber salad and peanut sauce on the side.

 

You'll need to find a good butcher to bring some into for you. I pay less than $3/lb uncleaned and likely get about 90% yield after trimming. Once you get good at it, you can clean them pretty quickly.

 

Cleaned at a higher end butcher's shop, you could expect to pay as much as $8/lb. However, that's still cheaper than most of the other steaks and twice as good as flank or skirt.

 

 

Tres bien.

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It is also referred to as the hanging tender. It is basically a flap of meat that hangs below the tenderloin area of the cow. It is two thin (10-16 oz), striated (like skirt or flank) steaks with a sheet of silverskin between them. If you buy them whole, you need to carefully separate them from this layer of silver skin.

 

When you cook them, make sure you don't go past MR because it is somewhat lean. Also, the grain is very coarse and be sure to slice against it. You'll need to basically slice it on the bias along the length of the steak.

 

At Jujube, we marinate them with fish sauce, sweet chili, and lemongrass before grilling them, slicing them and serving them with a cucumber salad and peanut sauce on the side.

 

You'll need to find a good butcher to bring some into for you. I pay less than $3/lb uncleaned and likely get about 90% yield after trimming. Once you get good at it, you can clean them pretty quickly.

 

Cleaned at a higher end butcher's shop, you could expect to pay as much as $8/lb. However, that's still cheaper than most of the other steaks and twice as good as flank or skirt.

 

 

Just for clarification ... is hanger steak the same as skirt steak? :D

 

I've had skirt steak and it's one of my favs ... now I guess I'll have to try and find hanger steak.

 

But this past weekend, I had an outstanding bone-in ribeye (delmonico) and Bobby Flays at the Borgata in AC. :D

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Just for clarification ... is hanger steak the same as skirt steak? :D

 

I've had skirt steak and it's one of my favs ... now I guess I'll have to try and find hanger steak.

 

But this past weekend, I had an outstanding bone-in ribeye (delmonico) and Bobby Flays at the Borgata in AC. :D

 

It is not the same cut of meat.

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I don't care where it comes from, it's mmm mmm good!

 

Well, as far as your concerned, it comes from Jujube, so you don't need to worry about it do you :D

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