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Hugh 0ne

Shotguns

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Your guide to shotguns

 

That should tell you everything you need to know about shotgun sizes, shell sizes, shell types & uses.

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The smaller the number, the larger the shot. The larger the shot , the less pellets per shell. If you buy #2's theres probly 8 or 10 per shell. #9's there might be 40 or 50 ( I'm guessing). If I wanted to shoot someone in my house with a 12 gauge I'd probly choose 4's or 6's. Enough pellets per shell to guarentee I ain't missing and large enough to knock 'em back a couple feet. :D

 

Here's your answer H1

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a lot of places u cant have buck shot....

That I didn't know, but I'm sure he can find out from any local gun dealer/ammo supplier when he goes to buy the gun & ammo. What kinda backerds ass state don't allow me mah buck shot? :D

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That I didn't know, but I'm sure he can find out from any local gun dealer/ammo supplier when he goes to buy the gun & ammo. What kinda backerds ass state don't allow me mah buck shot? :D

Minnesota and i bet NY

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Minnesota and i bet NY

 

Buckshot is allowed in NY. We can't purchase a weapon that has more than 10 rounds, but we can purchae buckshot. Also, to buy a shotgun in NY, all you need is to be 18 years old and they run a 5 minute background check on you. Then you're good to go. A pistol requires quite a bit more, applications, personal character witnesses, and it takes about 3 months to clear.

 

Thanks for all the info guys, I know there'd be some point when you ass backwards redneck momos would come in handy. :D

 

You guys are the best, GB the huddle.

Edited by Hugh 0ne

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Assuming buckshot is illegal, here would be your options. Note the relative difference in the nominal diameter of the shot is pretty minimal.

 

Size 	Nominal diameter 	Pellets/oz			Lead 	SteelBBB 	.190" (4.83 mm) 	44 	62BB 	.180" (4.57 mm) 	47 	72B 	.170" (4.32 mm) 	50 	1 	.160" (4.06 mm) 		1032 	.150" (3.81 mm) 	87 	1253 	.140" (3.56 mm) 		1584 	.130" (3.30 mm) 	135 	1925 	.120" (3.05 mm) 	170 	2436 	.110" (2.79 mm) 	225 	3157½ 	.095" (2.41 mm) 	350 	8 	.090" (2.29 mm) 	410 	9 	.080" (2.03 mm) 	585 	

 

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Buckshot is allowed in NY. We can't purchase a weapon that has more than 10 rounds, but we can purchae buckshot. Also, to buy a shotgun in NY, all you need is to be 18 years old and they run a 5 minute background check on you. Then you're good to go. A pistol requires quite a bit more, applications, personal character witnesses, and it takes about 3 months to clear.

 

Thanks for all the info guys, I know there'd be some point when you ass backwards redneck momos would come in handy. :D

 

You guys are the best, GB the huddle.

if its legal id have at least the last 3 loaded with that... wing'm first then put some big holes in them ...

 

and i was in the sun all day but redneck :D

 

u can get an extender on that mossy to make it a 10 round gun...

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Completely new to this, so pardon my ignorance:

 

What's the difference between a 12 gauge and 20 gauge shotgun? Please explain with details since I'm a newb, TIA.

Can you change ammunition types without having to modify the shotgun? In other words, can I use buck shot or bird shot in the same shot gun?

How easy and quick is it to reload a shotgun?

 

The particular shotgun I'm inquiring about if that is needed for your answers is a Mossberg 500 Persuader.

 

Thanks for your help. :D

 

Butte Montana

shotgun preteen vs. illegal alien home invaders

 

NRA files

Butte Montana

November 5, 2006

 

Home invasion gone wrong for criminals.

 

Two illegal aliens, (AKA undocumented guest workers) Ralphel Resindez 23 and Enrico Garza 26, probably believed they would easily overpower a home alone 11 year old Patricia Harrington after her father had left their two story home.

 

It seems the two crooks never learned two things; they were in Montana and Patricia had been a clay shooting champion since she was nine. Patricia was in her upstairs room when the two men broke through the front door of the house. She quickly ran to her father's room and grabbed his 12 gauge Mossberg 500 shotgun.

Resindez was the first to get up to the second floor only to be the first to catch a near point blank blast of buck shot from the 11 year old's knee crouch aim. He suffered fatal wounds to his abdomen and genitals. When Garza ran to the foot of the stairs, he took a blast to the left shoulder and staggered out into the street where he bled to death before medical help could arrive.

 

It was found out later that Resindez was armed with a stolen 45 caliber handgun he took from another home invasion robbery. The victim from that robbery, 50 year old David Burien, died from stab wounds to the chest.

 

The good part - Resindez and Garza lived long enough to know they were sent to the happy taco stand in the sky by an eleven year old GIRL ! ! !

 

 

 

I think you made the right choice.

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How do you handle the safety issue with your daughter?

 

How do you handle the safety issue with your daughter?

 

I leave the chamber empty, on safety. The magazine is full however.

 

She is a good kid, she knows NEVER to touch it among some other things in the house. We have no neighbors, so there are never any other kids around.

 

The rest of my guns and ammo are locked in a gun cabinet.

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I leave the chamber empty, on safety. The magazine is full however.

 

She is a good kid, she knows NEVER to touch it among some other things in the house. We have no neighbors, so there are never any other kids around.

 

The rest of my guns and ammo are locked in a gun cabinet.

 

How old is she? Also, on topic, someone care to explain to me the intricacies of trigger locks? Great for safety, not so good for fumbling with when an intruder is in the house?

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Butte Montana

shotgun preteen vs. illegal alien home invaders

 

NRA files

Butte Montana

November 5, 2006

 

Home invasion gone wrong for criminals.

 

Two illegal aliens, (AKA undocumented guest workers) Ralphel Resindez 23 and Enrico Garza 26, probably believed they would easily overpower a home alone 11 year old Patricia Harrington after her father had left their two story home.

 

It seems the two crooks never learned two things; they were in Montana and Patricia had been a clay shooting champion since she was nine. Patricia was in her upstairs room when the two men broke through the front door of the house. She quickly ran to her father's room and grabbed his 12 gauge Mossberg 500 shotgun.

Resindez was the first to get up to the second floor only to be the first to catch a near point blank blast of buck shot from the 11 year old's knee crouch aim. He suffered fatal wounds to his abdomen and genitals. When Garza ran to the foot of the stairs, he took a blast to the left shoulder and staggered out into the street where he bled to death before medical help could arrive.

 

It was found out later that Resindez was armed with a stolen 45 caliber handgun he took from another home invasion robbery. The victim from that robbery, 50 year old David Burien, died from stab wounds to the chest.

 

The good part - Resindez and Garza lived long enough to know they were sent to the happy taco stand in the sky by an eleven year old GIRL ! ! !

I think you made the right choice.

 

I'm not sure if this story makes me want to mow down a bunch of beaners or eat a chimichanga. :D

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So for a home defense type of application, 12 gauge would be better?

Also, I'm assuming a shorter barrel length would be slightly less accurate, right? 18.5 inches or 20 inches, what would be better?

 

Thanks Yuke. :D

Shorter barrels are better for home defense. The pattern spreads out quicker, therefore covering a larger area, meaning you don't have to be as accurate. Also the choke on the barrel can restrict the pattern. Full and modified chokes will be more restrictive than no choke. Finally, a shorter barrel will be easier to maneuver within the confines of a house. If it comes with a 24" barrel that would be about the best. I don't think there's much on the market with anything shorter than that.

 

Slugs are just that, one big slug of lead. Not so good for home defense. For teh rest, the size is indicated by the number. #9 bird shot has about 50 pellets in a typical 3" round. #6 bird shot has about 35. #0 buck shot has maybe 16. #00 buck shot even less. Of course the less pellets, the greater the size of each pellet. For home defense I like #00 buck shot. There aren't many of them, but even 1 will put a world of hurt on ya.

 

You can also get what's called low brass or high brass shells. The brass portion of a shotgun shell contains the gunpowder that propells the shot. Low brass has a lot less powder and may be good for learning to shoot but for home defense, make sure you have high brass.

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How old is she? Also, on topic, someone care to explain to me the intricacies of trigger locks? Great for safety, not so good for fumbling with when an intruder is in the house?

 

She is 5 going on 15.

 

I choose not to use a trigger lock, as I want immediate access. We live out in the boonies... some crazy schit can happen when you get out away from town and the popo's.

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Shorter barrels are better for home defense. The pattern spreads out quicker, therefore covering a larger area, meaning you don't have to be as accurate. Also the choke on the barrel can restrict the pattern. Full and modified chokes will be more restrictive than no choke. Finally, a shorter barrel will be easier to maneuver within the confines of a house. If it comes with a 24" barrel that would be about the best. I don't think there's much on the market with anything shorter than that.

 

Slugs are just that, one big slug of lead. Not so good for home defense. For teh rest, the size is indicated by the number. #9 bird shot has about 50 pellets in a typical 3" round. #6 bird shot has about 35. #0 buck shot has maybe 16. #00 buck shot even less. Of course the less pellets, the greater the size of each pellet. For home defense I like #00 buck shot. There aren't many of them, but even 1 will put a world of hurt on ya.

 

You can also get what's called low brass or high brass shells. The brass portion of a shotgun shell contains the gunpowder that propells the shot. Low brass has a lot less powder and may be good for learning to shoot but for home defense, make sure you have high brass.

 

I think that's what Yukon was trying to say. :D Thanks KC. :D

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I think that's what Yukon was trying to say. :D Thanks KC. :D

well sort of :tup:

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mine is an 870. someone told me a good idea for home defense is to load it up with alternating rounds -- slug, shot, slug, shot, slug, shot. that way you have both power and spread at your disposal.

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How old is she? Also, on topic, someone care to explain to me the intricacies of trigger locks? Great for safety, not so good for fumbling with when an intruder is in the house?

There are several different types of trigger locks out. Probably the best for you is the lighted touch-pad combo lock. That way you don't have to worry over someone finding the key or fumbling with it or a regular combo at night. What would be ideal though is the new finger-print ID locks, but I'm not sure if those are out yet.

 

As a side note H8's kid may be great and girls are typically a lot less likely to play with guns as a boy. But don't ever take gun safety for granted, accidents can happen anywhere to anyone. We used to fool around with guns of all types when we were kids. One of my friends blew a hole in his living room floor, another friend almost accidentally shot his Grandma with a 22 rifle.

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Seems like getting an 870 as a first shotgun is almost a must.

 

Good call.

 

Shotgun gauges are determined by the number of lead balls in that diameter it takes to make one pound. The exception is the .410 - which is measured in caliber.

 

Shotguns are excellent home defense guns, but if defense is the lone application, it should be quite short - less than 20" barrel. Alternating slugs and buckshot is an excellent strategy for defending yourself from a bear in the woods, but a terrible idea if you live with other people due to serious over-penetration. Small bird shot is a much better choice if you live with loved ones - it remains lethal at normal combat ranges and yet is slowed considerably or stopped entirely by normal building materials.

 

I recommend the Remongton 870 Marine Magnum for home defense applications. Outfit it with ghost-ring sights and a flashlight and you'll be in good shape. :D

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Shotguns are excellent home defense guns, but if defense is the lone application, it should be quite short - less than 20" barrel. Alternating slugs and buckshot is an excellent strategy for defending yourself from a bear in the woods, but a terrible idea if you live with other people due to serious over-penetration. Small bird shot is a much better choice if you live with loved ones - it remains lethal at normal combat ranges and yet is slowed considerably or stopped entirely by normal building materials. :D

 

ok but what if you find you need to shoot THROUGH building materials? like say there's a heavy door between you and the bad guy and you'd just as soon keep it that way. i think that was his point in recommending the slug/shot alternation.

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ok but what if you find you need to shoot THROUGH building materials? like say there's a heavy door between you and the bad guy and you'd just as soon keep it that way. i think that was his point in recommending the slug/shot alternation.

well buck shot or even bird shot will go threw a door if u are close enough to the door....

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ok but what if you find you need to shoot THROUGH building materials? like say there's a heavy door between you and the bad guy and you'd just as soon keep it that way. i think that was his point in recommending the slug/shot alternation.

 

Shooting through building materials is hardly ever a good idea - despite Hollywood's best representations. If you and your loved ones are behind a good solid door, great - stay there and cover it with whatever weapon is available.

 

If you are convinced you need to blast through building materials, use a heavy, centerfire rifle bullet.

 

There's a guy that plays with these kinds of scenarios and posts the video and results on this website. Box o' Truth . Check it out. I hope I am as useful when I retire. :D

Edited by Jimmy Neutron

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So for a home defense type of application, 12 gauge would be better?

Also, I'm assuming a shorter barrel length would be slightly less accurate, right? 18.5 inches or 20 inches, what would be better?

 

Thanks Yuke. :D

 

36 inch would be better for making it almost impossible for the intruder to make it out of your yard.

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How old is she? Also, on topic, someone care to explain to me the intricacies of trigger locks? Great for safety, not so good for fumbling with when an intruder is in the house?

 

Personally, I'd stay away from trigger locks. Multiple studies have shown them to be excessively difficult to remove while disoriented (waking up) and under stress (someone is in the house). They take too many fine motor skills to remove when someone is under stress. It doesn't do a damn bit of good to have a gun in the house if you can't get to it quickly if you need it.

 

My advice would be to keep an illuminated electronic push button safe near your bed. Keep the gun loaded in the safe, with a shell in the chamber and on safe.

 

I have opted for a daily routine of taking a gun to bed with me and returning it to the safe each morning. This can be dangerous, because you can simply never forget to do it. As strongly as I believe in being armed to the teeth, I believe even more in keeping my kids and their friends safe. My kids are also trained to back off and tell an adult if they ever find a gun, but kids are curious and it's not uncommon for us to have over a dozen kids through our house on a given day. You can't be too careful keeping guns away from curious kids.

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