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Footballjoe

Dog Training Question

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My son just bought a 6 week old female Americian Bulldog. After doing a little research on the Net my wife found out we should not have gotten the puppy until the 8th week. The previous owner had already seperated the puppies from the mother just a few days before we purchased her. My wife was reading about how insecure dogs have a tendacy to be more aggressive. Will letting the puppy sleep with someone for a few weeks make the puppy feel more secure and thus less aggressive? Also, will it hamper its grate training later? Thanks

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I hear slamming the dog against the ground does wonders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

....well someone was gonna say it. :D

Edited by budlitebrad

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My son just bought a 6 week old female Americian Bulldog. After doing a little research on the Net my wife found out we should not have gotten the puppy until the 8th week. The previous owner had already seperated the puppies from the mother just a few days before we purchased her. My wife was reading about how insecure dogs have a tendacy to be more aggressive. Will letting the puppy sleep with someone for a few weeks make the puppy feel more secure and thus less aggressive? Also, will it hamper its grate training later? Thanks

 

Don't do it. Let that puppy sleep with you tonight and your stuck with her for 14 years. Put her in the crate, let her cry all night, and take it like a man.

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Don't do it. Let that puppy sleep with you tonight and your stuck with her for 14 years. Put her in the crate, let her cry all night, and take it like a man.

Yup. We got our black lab at about 6 weeks. She's a bit of a spaz, but I think that has more to do with her breed than the fact she was maybe taken from her mama a bit early.

 

:D Sugar Magnolia, paging Sugar Magnolia

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Don't do it. Let that puppy sleep with you tonight and your stuck with her for 14 years. Put her in the crate, let her cry all night, and take it like a man.

Good info here. Our Corgi was crate trained but the wife started bringing her into bed around the third week we had her. I now have to wrestle the dog for my rightful place in bed each night. :D

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Good info here. Our Corgi was crate trained but the wife started bringing her into bed around the third week we had her. I now have to wrestle the dog for my rightful place in bed each night. :D

 

I have to do that with an 80 lb lab. I've paid a price for going out of town a lot and giving the wife the chance to let the dog on the bed.

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I have to do that with an 80 lb lab. I've paid a price for going out of town a lot and giving the wife the chance to let the dog on the bed.

Yeah, you win.

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I should add that all the research my wife found was geared toward puppies 8 weeks an older. We were talking and think maybe putting her in a small box with a blanket would help her feel more secure, rather than using a crate

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Yeah, you win.

 

I had her trained so well too. Up until about 8 months, she never even tried to get on the bed.

 

FBJ, use the crate: Stuff it with blankets / towels, whatever. Be prepared to go outside many times a night for a few weeks and the first few nights will involve some crying...but when you're done crying you'll realize that the crate is the greatest dog training invention ever.

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I had her trained so well too. Up until about 8 months, she never even tried to get on the bed.

 

FBJ, use the crate: Stuff it with blankets / towels, whatever. Be prepared to go outside many times a night for a few weeks and the first few nights will involve some crying...but when you're done crying you'll realize that the crate is the greatest dog training invention ever.

 

The only reason I we were thinking of using a box is because the crate is for a large dog. The box would act as a crate.

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I should add that all the research my wife found was geared toward puppies 8 weeks an older. We were talking and think maybe putting her in a small box with a blanket would help her feel more secure, rather than using a crate

Joe,

 

The dog loves the crate. Its not a bad thing as some folks think. They are denning animals. She has blankeys, toys, and loves sleeping in there. We got her very young and she cried for no more than three nights. Now she will go into the crate on her own. We don't even really have to shut the door. Its her room and she likes it. I urge you to give it an honest two week try. Not much different than a child really. Folks that let their kids sleep with them often regret it later.

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Good info here. Our Corgi was crate trained but the wife started bringing her into bed around the third week we had her. I now have to wrestle the dog for my rightful place in bed each night. :D

 

 

Does she sleep in between twoobs ?

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Wait til Sugar Magnolia sees your post. She's our resident expert in this area.

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Wait til Sugar Magnolia sees your post. She's our resident expert in this area.

He can't wait cuz he's gonna let that bitch in the bed tonite and will then be screwed.

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He can't wait cuz he's gonna let that bitch in the bed tonite and will then be screwed.

 

I let my dog sleep in my bed for several months when she was a puppy. However, I got very tired of my wife complaining about the shedding in the bed. So we brought my dog's bed into our room at night. The first night she jumped in our bed and I shooed her out and took her to her pillow. Honestly, that was the last time I had a problem.

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crate the dog . in youre room for about 3 weeks... then ourside close to the room for about 2 , then it s good were ever.... u should have gotten a lab they are the best

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These guideliens are averages. I sleep with my puppies at first and then they usually take over the closet instead of a crate or box. Every animal is different and does their own thing later. Much like kids their personalities develop and they become independent.

 

But then I get huskie/shepard mixes. Mutts are the best.

Edited by Randall

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Yup. We got our black lab at about 6 weeks. She's a bit of a spaz, but I think that has more to do with her breed than the fact she was maybe taken from her mama a bit early.

 

:D Sugar Magnolia, paging Sugar Magnolia

 

Six weeks is considered too young now, but was the norm 15-20 years ago. Now 8-10 weeks is more the norm. The issues that come up when removing the puppy too early from their littermates are:

 

1. The most important: starting at about 3 1/2 weeks puppies start playing. Play is an important part of development. The most important part of playing with littermates is puppies use their mouths and learn how to control their bite-called bite inhibition. When puppies bite each other and it hurts they squeal and run away from the biter. Puppies learn how to control their bite this way. If they control their bite, littermate will continue to play with them. If they bite too hard, play ends. Singleton puppies are a nightmare and I've trained a few (only one born in a litter) The singletons have not learned bite inhibition from littermates and they play bite their owners and draw blood, or their new doggy sibling in their new family. This may be why you may have heard puppies taken away too soon become aggressive.

 

2. When puppies play with littermates this creates social skills. Puppies learn hierarchies. The strongest puppies become the alphas starting as early as 3 weeks of age and the weaker puppies become subordinates. Learning hierarchies is important in deveopment and the longer they are with their littermates the clearer the hierarchies become. Another reason why puppies taken away too soon could possibly become aggressive.

 

3. Play with littermates creates good coordination which helps in development.

 

It's not a disaster for a puppy to be taken away at 6 weeks. You just need to do the right things to continue proper development. If you PM me, I will link you to a handout on how to continue to teach your puppy good bite inhibition. I just wrote an article on how to prevent aggressive issues in adult dogs by doing proper socialization when puppies. Many books and articles talk about the importance of socialization, but don't talk about how to do it right, or why it is important. I can link you my article.

 

In regards to puppies on the bed. If you bought a Golden Retriever I'd say put him in bed with you. You bought an American Bulldog Terrier which is a breed that can be status seeking and challenge you as an alpha, and elevation (being at the same level or higher than you) to a dog is status. My suggestion is to crate train and not allow on the bed until you know his temperament. How I did it with my puppy (now almost 9 yrs ago), was to put the crate by my bed-it is very hard for a puppy to be alone after having 2-11 littermates to sleep with every night. I put a stuffed animal in the crate (later my kitten slept with him in the crate), and if you can, find a way to warm the stuffed animal to feel more like his littermate. Some people use a hot water bladder. You could get down on the floor and sleep with him. BTW, one night or two with you is no big deal, 4 months on the bed with you might be. I've had people allow their puppy to sleep with them and when they are sound alsleep gently slip them into a crate. No different than having your newborn fall asleep in your arms and then put them in the crib.

 

One hard thing about getting a puppy young is, the rule of thumb is the puppy can hold it's bladder for the number of months old it is. So, you need to get up minimum every two hours to let it out. If a puppy starts to soil it's crate, (or your own bed), it will sensitize to it and not care if it is soiling it, and a crate is a key to housebreaking since a dog naturally does not want to soil it's bed/den. Also it's important to get the right size crate. If too big, it will just go to the other end of the crate to soil, and come back to it's bed. I got my puppy at 7 weeks and I think I went to bed at 11:00, let him out at 2:00, then at 4:00 and my husband got up at 6:00. When he whined, he got let out to potty, and my puppy created that schedule. I can also link you to good articles on housebreaking and crate training. Many of my clients would have a hard time crate training. I'd take the puppy for a three day weekend and their dog would go from hating the crate to loving it so much they wanted to be in it all the time.

 

Hope this helps.

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Suger Magnolia is the MAN!

 

 

 

Six weeks is considered too young now, but was the norm 15-20 years ago. Now 8-10 weeks is more the norm. The issues that come up when removing the puppy too early from their littermates are:

 

1. The most important: starting at about 3 1/2 weeks puppies start playing. Play is an important part of development. The most important part of playing with littermates is puppies use their mouths and learn how to control their bite-called bite inhibition. When puppies bite each other and it hurts they squeal and run away from the biter. Puppies learn how to control their bite this way. If they control their bite, littermate will continue to play with them. If they bite too hard, play ends. Singleton puppies are a nightmare and I've trained a few (only one born in a litter) The singletons have not learned bite inhibition from littermates and they play bite their owners and draw blood, or their new doggy sibling in their new family. This may be why you may have heard puppies taken away too soon become aggressive.

 

2. When puppies play with littermates this creates social skills. Puppies learn hierarchies. The strongest puppies become the alphas starting as early as 3 weeks of age and the weaker puppies become subordinates. Learning hierarchies is important in deveopment and the longer they are with their littermates the clearer the hierarchies become. Another reason why puppies taken away too soon could possibly become aggressive.

 

3. Play with littermates creates good coordination which helps in development.

 

It's not a disaster for a puppy to be taken away at 6 weeks. You just need to do the right things to continue proper development. If you PM me, I will link you to a handout on how to continue to teach your puppy good bite inhibition. I just wrote an article on how to prevent aggressive issues in adult dogs by doing proper socialization when puppies. Many books and articles talk about the importance of socialization, but don't talk about how to do it right, or why it is important. I can link you my article.

 

In regards to puppies on the bed. If you bought a Golden Retriever I'd say put him in bed with you. You bought an American Bulldog Terrier which is a breed that can be status seeking and challenge you as an alpha, and elevation (being at the same level or higher than you) to a dog is status. My suggestion is to crate train and not allow on the bed until you know his temperament. How I did it with my puppy (now almost 9 yrs ago), was to put the crate by my bed-it is very hard for a puppy to be alone after having 2-11 littermates to sleep with every night. I put a stuffed animal in the crate (later my kitten slept with him in the crate), and if you can, find a way to warm the stuffed animal to feel more like his littermate. Some people use a hot water bladder. You could get down on the floor and sleep with him. BTW, one night or two with you is no big deal, 4 months on the bed with you might be. I've had people allow their puppy to sleep with them and when they are sound alsleep gently slip them into a crate. No different than having your newborn fall asleep in your arms and then put them in the crib.

 

One hard thing about getting a puppy young is, the rule of thumb is the puppy can hold it's bladder for the number of months old it is. So, you need to get up minimum every two hours to let it out. If a puppy starts to soil it's crate, (or your own bed), it will sensitize to it and not care if it is soiling it, and a crate is a key to housebreaking since a dog naturally does not want to soil it's bed/den. Also it's important to get the right size crate. If too big, it will just go to the other end of the crate to soil, and come back to it's bed. I got my puppy at 7 weeks and I think I went to bed at 11:00, let him out at 2:00, then at 4:00 and my husband got up at 6:00. When he whined, he got let out to potty, and my puppy created that schedule. I can also link you to good articles on housebreaking and crate training. Many of my clients would have a hard time crate training. I'd take the puppy for a three day weekend and their dog would go from hating the crate to loving it so much they wanted to be in it all the time.

 

Hope this helps.

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Suger Magnolia is the MAN!

 

 

Isnt Sugar a woman ?

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Isnt Sugar a woman ?

yes

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I have to do that with an 80 lb lab. I've paid a price for going out of town a lot and giving the wife the chance to let the dog on the bed.

 

I've got a 105 lb lab that believes my side of the bed is his. I feel like I literally have maybe 8 inches on the farthest edge of the bed to sleep on... and if my son climbs in in the morning, I may as well be sleeping on the floor.

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Isnt Sugar a woman ?

 

I know, but she is the Man when it comes to dog training!

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I know, but she is the Man when it comes to dog training!

 

 

Gotcha

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Great information Sugar. My family and I really apprecite it. That part about learning bite sensivity was going on with my hand today. She was going at it but never scratch me. Thanks a million. PM sent.

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