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Chevy Volt to get 230 MPG (yes 230) city fuel economy rating


TimC
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GM press release:

 

Chevrolet Volt Expects 230 mpg in City Driving

 

* First mass-produced vehicle to claim more than 100 mpg composite fuel economy

* Tentative EPA methodology results show 25 kilowatt hours/100 miles electrical efficiency in city cycle

* Plugging in daily is key to high-mileage performance

 

WARREN, Mich. - The Chevrolet Volt extended-range electric vehicle is expected to achieve city fuel economy of at least 230 miles per gallon, based on development testing using a draft EPA federal fuel economy methodology for labeling for plug-in electric vehicles.

 

The Volt, which is scheduled to start production in late 2010 as a 2011 model, is expected to travel up to 40 miles on electricity from a single battery charge and be able to extend its overall range to more than 300 miles with its flex fuel-powered engine-generator.

 

"From the data we've seen, many Chevy Volt drivers may be able to be in pure electric mode on a daily basis without having to use any gas," said GM Chief Executive Officer Fritz Henderson. "EPA labels are a yardstick for customers to compare the fuel efficiency of vehicles. So, a vehicle like the Volt that achieves a composite triple-digit fuel economy is a game-changer."

 

According to U.S. Department of Transportation data, nearly eight of 10 Americans commute fewer than 40 miles a day http://SPAM.com/U-S-DOTStudy .

 

"The key to high-mileage performance is for a Volt driver to plug into the electric grid at least once each day," Henderson said.

 

Volt drivers' actual gas-free mileage will vary depending on how far they travel and other factors, such as how much cargo or how many passengers they carry and how much the air conditioner or other accessories are used. Based on the results of unofficial development testing of pre-production prototypes, the Volt has achieved 40 miles of electric-only, petroleum-free driving in both EPA city and highway test cycles.

 

Under the new methodology being developed, EPA weights plug-in electric vehicles as traveling more city miles than highway miles on only electricity. The EPA methodology uses kilowatt hours per 100 miles traveled to define the electrical efficiency of plug-ins. Applying EPA's methodology, GM expects the Volt to consume as little as 25 kilowatt hours per 100 miles in city driving. At the U.S. average cost of electricity (approximately 11 cents per kWh), a typical Volt driver would pay about $2.75 for electricity to travel 100 miles, or less than 3 cents per mile.

 

The Chevrolet Volt uses grid electricity as its primary source of energy to propel the car. There are two modes of operation: Electric and Extended-Range. In electric mode, the Volt will not use gasoline or produce tailpipe emissions when driving. During this primary mode of operation, the Volt is powered by electrical energy stored in its 16 kWh lithium-ion battery pack.

 

When the battery reaches a minimum state of charge, the Volt automatically switches to Extended-Range mode. In this secondary mode of operation, an engine-generator produces electricity to power the vehicle. The energy stored in the battery supplements the engine-generator when additional power is needed during heavy accelerations or on steep inclines.

 

"The 230 city mpg number is a great indication of the capabilities of the Volt's electric propulsion system and its ability to displace gasoline," said Frank Weber, global vehicle line executive for the Volt. "Actual testing with production vehicles will occur next year closer to vehicle launch. However, we are very encouraged by this development, and we also think that it is important to continue to share our findings in real time, as we have with other aspects of the Volt's development."

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How does that translate to time in vehicle? My wife's commute is 32 miles but takes an hour and a half. Is there enough juice to cover three hours in commuter traffic?

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Key words there are "first generation". Why do you hate America and our progress?

 

 

because that means more of our tax dollars to prop up gm until it can make an affordable car. decades and decades. and the toyota i bought was built in indiana. yep, i really hate amerika.

Edited by dmarc117
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Can tall people fit into this car or is it built for the, um, atmospherically challenged...?

Yes, I wonder this as well. :wacko:

 

It seems to me Chevy really needs to have more realistic pricing. Almost $40K? :D I think that new Dodge electric car looks much cooler...

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Headroom (in / mm):

 

front: 37.3 / 947

 

rear: 35.9 / 912

 

Legroom (in / mm):

 

31.5 / 802

 

Shoulder room (in / mm):

 

50.6 / 1285

 

Hip room (in / mm):

 

53.1 / 1349

 

Uniformly about 2-3 inches smaller than a mid size like a Ford Taurus, I'm guessing anyone over 6 feet isn't going to enjoy the Volt experience (especially in the back seat)

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How does that translate to time in vehicle? My wife's commute is 32 miles but takes an hour and a half. Is there enough juice to cover three hours in commuter traffic?

 

Electric engines don't idle. They only use the power when they need it. So, the stop and go shouldn't be as bad as it is in a gas powered car.

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Electric engines don't idle. They only use the power when they need it. So, the stop and go shouldn't be as bad as it is in a gas powered car.

 

What if you're also running the AC, radio, charging your phone, etc? How much juice do you lose running those other electrical items?

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What if you're also running the AC, radio, charging your phone, etc? How much juice do you lose running those other electrical items?

That's kind of what I was getting at. There's more than just auto movement to battery life.

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Headroom (in / mm):

 

front: 37.3 / 947

 

rear: 35.9 / 912

 

Legroom (in / mm):

 

31.5 / 802

 

Shoulder room (in / mm):

 

50.6 / 1285

 

Hip room (in / mm):

 

53.1 / 1349

 

Uniformly about 2-3 inches smaller than a mid size like a Ford Taurus, I'm guessing anyone over 6 feet isn't going to enjoy the Volt experience (especially in the back seat)

Have you been in one of the new Ford Taurus's? They are freakin' cavernous so methinks a few inches all the way around ain't gonna make much of a difference.

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Yes, I wonder this as well. :wacko:

 

It seems to me Chevy really needs to have more realistic pricing. Almost $40K? :D I think that new Dodge electric car looks much cooler...

 

You could drive cross country and pay way north of that for a used vehicle if you'd like. :D

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Have you been in one of the new Ford Taurus's? They are freakin' cavernous so methinks a few inches all the way around ain't gonna make much of a difference.

The box that my crappy shoes from spammers's came in is cavernous for you.

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Electric engines don't idle. They only use the power when they need it. So, the stop and go shouldn't be as bad as it is in a gas powered car.

 

that's not the main reason why cars get poorer mileage in stop and go traffic. a car can idle for days on a tank of gas. the main reason for poor mileage in stop and go traffic is that it takes a lot of energy to constantly accelerate, decelerate, and re-accelerate. every time you hit the brake pedal you're throwing away kinetic energy. and that is the same no matter what fuel your car uses. so if 40 miles is the range under typical driving conditions, I am certain you can expect significantly less than that in very heavy congestion.

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that's not the main reason why cars get poorer mileage in stop and go traffic. a car can idle for days on a tank of gas. the main reason for poor mileage in stop and go traffic is that it takes a lot of energy to constantly accelerate, decelerate, and re-accelerate. every time you hit the brake pedal you're throwing away kinetic energy. and that is the same no matter what fuel your car uses. so if 40 miles is the range under typical driving conditions, I am certain you can expect significantly less than that in very heavy congestion.

 

Electric cars have better performance at lower revs too. Gas engines don't reach peak efficiency until they get around 4-6K RPMs going. That's why they need 6 gears to get to the speeds an electric motor can reach in one.

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Electric cars have better performance at lower revs too. Gas engines don't reach peak efficiency until they get around 4-6K RPMs going. That's why they need 6 gears to get to the speeds an electric motor can reach in one.

Define performance please...

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