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Question for construction types


detlef
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Like basically every restaurant, the wall behind my cook's line is lined with stainless steel. I'm sure code requires a minimum thickness, though I don't know what it is. None the less, I was there went it went up and it was reasonably but not super thick. If I had to guess, I'd say around 20 gauge. It was attached to to dry wall, hung on metal studs, with construction adhesive.

 

At any rate, I want to hang a 4ft length of wire shelving over the griddle to store plates during service so they'll stay warm. The brackets that hold the shelving up are connected to the wall by plates that use 6, #12 screws each. So, all told, the weight is held in by 12 screws. Needless to say, that rack, full of plates is going to be somewhat heavy (say 100+ lbs).

 

My question is this: Do you think the stainless is strong enough to keep the screws from pulling out?

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NO ....find a stud....take off a walloutlet or switch cover off and see what side of the stud it is secured to....if your lucky ya can pull 16" centers IF thats the way it's layed out.....try ta find a place away from the stainless ta double check stud location and use a skinny finish nail ta find'em.....seal with caulk and transfer locations ta stainless....predrill stainless and attach

Edited by nuke'em ttg
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NO ....find a stud

I'm afraid of that. Hopefully they're set at 16 inches but even if that's the case, it's highly unlikely that they just happen to line-up with the griddle. Also, aren't metal studs sort of crappy for this sort of thing? If it was any other wall, I'd just find studs and screw and glue a 1x10 up there to screw the shelf into, but that's a no-go behind the hot-line.

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Construction types and handymen here won't be able to fully answer this question because every Health Department has different standards. Call your County's Health Department to make sure you're to code.

Code is not an issue in this regard as long as I don't introduce wood to the situation.

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I'm afraid of that. Hopefully they're set at 16 inches but even if that's the case, it's highly unlikely that they just happen to line-up with the griddle. Also, aren't metal studs sort of crappy for this sort of thing? If it was any other wall, I'd just find studs and screw and glue a 1x10 up there to screw the shelf into, but that's a no-go behind the hot-line.

 

check my edit Det.....if they're metal studs use self tappin screws....as far as weight bearing you'll be fine i did a bunch of HEAVY book shelves on them and it's fine.....health dept shouldn't have a problem if everything (bracket.shelf is metel) the layout prolly won't be perfect but it might surprise ya and ya just make it work

Edited by nuke'em ttg
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In that case listen to nukiepoo and definitely find the studs. That shouldn't be a problem for you. :D

it takes a stud ta build a house or star in a movie....they gave me a tool pelt instead of a real pelt ta work with :wacko:

Edited by nuke'em ttg
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I hope you are not hanging them directly over the grill. As an ex line cook, I can guarantee you somebody will drop a plate on the grill...creating massive gridlock during a big rush. I wouldn't like that setup at all. You can't stack your plates under the heat lamps?

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I hope you are not hanging them directly over the grill. As an ex line cook, I can guarantee you somebody will drop a plate on the grill...creating massive gridlock during a big rush. I wouldn't like that setup at all. You can't stack your plates under the heat lamps?

 

Ooh - hadn't thought of that. Dropping a plate and having it shatter on the grill instantly trashes everything the shards might have flown on.

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I hope you are not hanging them directly over the grill. As an ex line cook, I can guarantee you somebody will drop a plate on the grill...creating massive gridlock during a big rush. I wouldn't like that setup at all. You can't stack your plates under the heat lamps?

I was thinking this too......and the fact that plates over a greasy/hot cooking surface mean you'll be washing and rewashing a lot of supposedly "clean" plates. If you are determined...there are probably holes in the stainless other than the 16" mark. As in inbetween. Use a good drywall anchor where there isn't a stud. But definitely use as many studs as possible for the length of the shelving.

 

In this case......don't be anal about it all "lining up"......lol. Just be safe. :wacko:

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Nearly every restaurant I've ever worked at stored plates on shelves above the line and I can't for the life of me recall one instance where that became a problem. Eventually they get greasy but since you can only store so many back there anyway, they're typically not up there long enough to do so. I actually chose the griddle in particular because it is the cooking surface that produces the least amount of grease, smoke, or other vapors.

 

We don't use heat lamps so that is not an option.

Edited by detlef
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The stainless if 20 gauge is about as stout as the studs behind the wall, which are plenty strong to hold what you are trying to hold. Usually we put wood blocking between metal studs to hang shelves on (because you can use cheaper screws) but in this case the stainless would act as your blocking, and should be plenty strong. The problem is the stainless isn't attached to the studs, but is basically glued to the gypsum board, that hold isn't much better than the paper facing on the gypsum board. If you want to do this, probably the best thing to do would be find the studs, and then screw the stainless to the studs using an stainless screw, then use stainless toggle bolts to attache the shelf to the wall.

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The stainless if 20 gauge is about as stout as the studs behind the wall, which are plenty strong to hold what you are trying to hold. Usually we put wood blocking between metal studs to hang shelves on (because you can use cheaper screws) but in this case the stainless would act as your blocking, and should be plenty strong. The problem is the stainless isn't attached to the studs, but is basically glued to the gypsum board, that hold isn't much better than the paper facing on the gypsum board. If you want to do this, probably the best thing to do would be find the studs, and then screw the stainless to the studs using an stainless screw, then use stainless toggle bolts to attache the shelf to the wall.

That makes a lot of sense. And, btw, the contractor did put in wood blocking between studs on all the walls in the prep and scullery rooms because we knew we'd be hanging shelves there.

Edited by detlef
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I've worked in rest's that have very cool dish drawers that are heated...and even cubby holes that soak heat from the serving line holes. I don't know your restaurant so its kinda hard to really say...I'd love to see a picture though. Just not sure storing plates directly over the grill is the best place is all.

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