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rajncajn

The Project Thread

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I had one of these in another forum that I no longer visit. I like to chronicle DIY projects and I'm currently working on one that sorta involves The Huddle. More to come tomorrow when I'm not typing on a phone. I'll also share some past projects and some future ones that I'm looking forward to. 

Edited by rajncajn
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Current project is bathroom remodel. Let me say first, that our house and our bathrooms are pretty small. This was our first & only house purchase and for a number of reasons I won't go too deep into, we've never tried to upgrade. Let's just say Katrina played a very significant role in that. We also still love our home and it's location. That said, our 2 bathrooms are basically 5'x8' mirror images of one-another, with the only exception being the master bath has a window.

 

Second preface is that I did not do all this work on my own. As many of you know, after Katrina The Huddle got together & decided to give me a hand in my rebuild and several of those Huddlers (led by @SteelBunz) actually came down to help with the construction, twice. Steelbunz, who does remodeling for a living, did the tile throughout the house and installed our then new bathtub in the master bath. We all worked on redoing the drywall from 4' down. The existing drywall in the bathrooms had this terrible 70's foil wallpaper and after much struggle to remove it, the wife & I decided to just cover it with a foam textured paper and paint it. Fast forward to now, we wanted it both gone and replaced with the proper mildew-resistant stuff. Also, unfortunately, we never did complete the master bath. We had a tub/toilet/sink, but never did the tile around the tub and so it was really little-used. Now, having done all the lower drywall in the house, including mudding/texturing/painting, I knew there was one thing that I was really terrible at & that is floating drywall. So I decided to hire a contractor and have him finish the drywall, bath tile & baseboard trim. In order to keep the cost down, I'm doing everything else, including rip-out and prep, myself.

 

First couple of pics is the front bathroom (don't judge). I thought I'd taken a couple of before pics, but obviously not, so the first pics are with the drywall down. That weird, stud box-looking thing in the 2nd pic apparently was for a set-in medicine cabinet the previous owner had removed. I ripped all that out and replaced the stud. The difference in insulation is due to what we replaced after Katrina. Also, we decided not to replace the front shower to cut costs. Although it really needed it, I wasn't confident in installing a new one myself & the cost of having the remodeler replace it was just way too high. I think he gave me an "I don't really want to do it" price even though I was doing the ripout myself. Also, it would have put us without a usable bath/shower until the contractor was done and that just don't fly with multiple females in the house. Another project for another time. The ceiling drywall was done by me already. We were getting mildew on the popcorn ceiling since everyone in my house used that shower. Doing that reminded me how much I didn't want to do the drywall myself.

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These second two pics are the master bath after ripout. As you can see, the tub is practically brand new since we only used it to take baths & we almost always use the shower instead. Again, the chitty job of a medicine cabinet frame was replaced.

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Here, master bath has new drywall, backer board & tile going up. Just waiting for the quartz piece to be cut for the inset so he can finish it out.

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And the front bath with new drywall as well

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Quartz piece finally in and shower (as well as contractor) is now complete. I do still have to install the spigot, which is on hold until I get a brazing torch to put an extension onto the pipe so that the spigot marries up clean to the tile without leaking or a gap. We've now started using this shower exclusively until I have the front bath completely done.

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And, finally, up to where I'm at now. Front bath is completely painted other than one coat left on the ceiling. I've replaced all the fixture valves, door hardware and electrical/piping cover plates as well as installed the new light fixture. Minor screw-up, I dropped the old light fixture while trying to get it in & it shattered all over the bathroom. I'm now working on trimming the ceiling and around the tub. Yes, I know the tub still looks nasty, but I'm not cleaning all the construction gunk off it until I'm completely done and we're ready to start using it again.

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Still on my to-do for the front bath:

-Touch up ceiling paint

-Install vent covers

-Complete trimwork

-Install sink/cabinet

-Install medicine cabinet

-Purchase & hang new door mirror

-Install new towel rods/hooks

-Install new shower rod

 

Then on to finish the master bath.

Edited by rajncajn

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Very nice Rajn!  I'm handy with certain things but try to rarely mess with plumbing or electric. 

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Nice!! Yeah!!

I really wish I could have come down one more time and really finish those bathrooms out for you!  A complete tearout of the drywall is what it really needed!

In your humid climate, I highly recommend using the Microban paint additive to control mold and mildew. I hope your contractor used a setting-type drywall mud...and not the premixed stuff. Mold loves latex. Use an acrylic paint...Benjamin Moore paints are the best. 1.5 oz of Microban isn't enough to "thin" their nicely thick paints.

 

Looking nice, Rajn!!👍

 

Screenshot_20211022-093759_Chrome.jpg

Edited by SteelBunz

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22 minutes ago, SteelBunz said:

Nice!! Yeah!!

I really wish I could have come down one more time and really finish those bathrooms out for you!  A complete tearout of the drywall is what it really needed!

In your humid climate, I highly recommend using the Microban paint additive to control mold and mildew. I hope your contractor used a setting-type drywall mud...and not the premixed stuff. Mold loves latex. Use an acrylic paint...Benjamin Moore paints are the best. 1.5 oz of Microban isn't enough to "thin" their nicely thick paints.

 

Looking nice, Rajn!!👍

 

:lol:

I guess I should have asked first. Too late on the paint, we've already bought it. It's a latex, but it's the higher end Valspar with the mildew resistant additive included. Welll, I guess if it mildews again that'll be a good excuse to paint it again. Maybe then I'll replace that front tub. Next up though is painting the outside of the house. We just had a bunch of the siding and trim replaced and it looks kinda patchwork right now. Then I have some fence that needs replacing. The work never ends...

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Lol...it NEVER ends...lol😂

Oh well...just passing on knowledge...lol. I always use acrylic paint in bathrooms and kitchens. And paint on the ceiling with a bit of sheen. Eggshell, satin, pearl....instead of ceiling white, which is not cleanable. Added bonus, more bouncing of light where you need it.

I just try to remove everything that mold likes in those spaces. Paperless drywall, setting-type mud, thinset (no mastik)...and no latex. *shrug*

I've never had a callback, so it must be working...lol😉

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And...install a timer for your vent fan. Let it run an extra ten minutes after a shower to clear the steam.👍

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18 minutes ago, SteelBunz said:

And...install a timer for your vent fan. Let it run an extra ten minutes after a shower to clear the steam.👍

Good idea. Honestly,  I think the biggest problem was that all 4 of us were all taking our showers in the same bathroom and that it was all just basic drywall to begin with.  Of we ever start getting the mildew again then I'll definitely look for the acrylic stuff.

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I'm not handy at all so always impressed to see what people do themselves. 

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23 hours ago, stevegrab said:

I'm not handy at all so always impressed to see what people do themselves. 

Anyone can be handy if they just take the time to figure things out. Most stuff isn't as difficult as you think. See my next post for instance.

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This, folks, is what we call a project within a project.

 

So, getting ready to install all the trim I pre-cut & painted and go to test the depth/pressure of the brad nailer. POP! Works great, perfect depth, love that sound... Try a different piece of trim, PFFFT, nothing. Jam? no. Lube it up, no. Remove the cover from the driver mechanism and everything is sliding freely. Is it supposed to slide freely? Don't know.  Remove the back cover from the piston, spring is laying loose and crumbly bits of dry-rotted plastic are everywhere. *sigh* Going to finish up the ceiling paint, install the new shower rod and then bathroom is again on hold until the replacement part comes in.

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1 hour ago, rajncajn said:

Anyone can be handy if they just take the time to figure things out. Most stuff isn't as difficult as you think. See my next post for instance.

 

Thanks appreciate the encouragement. I find that if you didn't learn some basics at some point when you were younger it is harder to learn later. About 20 years ago when I started riding motorcycles I had few mechanical skills, never worked on cars and such. Since the hobby can be expensive with maintenance when you ride a lot (tires at least once, maybe twice a year, oil changes too, brake pads, chains and other things all wear out). So I learned a bit during that time, and continue to do my own work to some degree, but not like my friends of a similar age or older who have been wrenching on vehicles since they were teenagers. 

 

I just don't have much confidence in my own abilities nor do I have a lot of patience to learn. When you've been doing stuff around the house for 20-30 years or more like some of my friends you already have a vast amount of experience to fall back on, to help you get thru that time when it doesn't work ride. Besides all that, I earn a good living, and with no family I have limited expenses and can afford to pay people to do those things. 

 

The first oil change I did I stripped the drain plug putting back in "until tight" as the manual said, well it seemed to keep moving so I kept going :bash:  I almost quit doing any maintenance at that point, but learned a lesson and moved on. 

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1 hour ago, stevegrab said:

 

Thanks appreciate the encouragement. I find that if you didn't learn some basics at some point when you were younger it is harder to learn later. About 20 years ago when I started riding motorcycles I had few mechanical skills, never worked on cars and such. Since the hobby can be expensive with maintenance when you ride a lot (tires at least once, maybe twice a year, oil changes too, brake pads, chains and other things all wear out). So I learned a bit during that time, and continue to do my own work to some degree, but not like my friends of a similar age or older who have been wrenching on vehicles since they were teenagers. 

 

I just don't have much confidence in my own abilities nor do I have a lot of patience to learn. When you've been doing stuff around the house for 20-30 years or more like some of my friends you already have a vast amount of experience to fall back on, to help you get thru that time when it doesn't work ride. Besides all that, I earn a good living, and with no family I have limited expenses and can afford to pay people to do those things. 

 

The first oil change I did I stripped the drain plug putting back in "until tight" as the manual said, well it seemed to keep moving so I kept going :bash:  I almost quit doing any maintenance at that point, but learned a lesson and moved on. 

My biggest tips are: Pay attention to how things go together as you disassemble them and if your memory is bad then take plenty of pictures. Pictures also help if you ever have to do the same job again. Another is youtube. You can pretty much find out how to do almost any home, auto or diy fix on there. The only problem with it is that those people will talk for an hour just to show something that takes 15 minutes.

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On 10/23/2021 at 5:02 PM, rajncajn said:

My biggest tips are: Pay attention to how things go together as you disassemble them and if your memory is bad then take plenty of pictures. Pictures also help if you ever have to do the same job again. Another is youtube. You can pretty much find out how to do almost any home, auto or diy fix on there. The only problem with it is that those people will talk for an hour just to show something that takes 15 minutes.

And the fact that some of them really DON'T know what they are talking about.🤣

Honestly...know what you can do...and what would be better to hire out. Key is to know enough to know whether the people you hire are doing it right.

For example...I can do a new roof. Should I? Hell no...lol🤪😉

And don't break anything unless you know how to fix it or you know someone who can!😉

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Oh,  this is a fun one! [sarcasm]

 

We have a microwave range hood and a couple of days ago my daughter said the microwave turns on when you open the door. Fortunately,  but unfortunately I've seen this problem or something similar before and knew right away that likelt one or more of the door switches went out.

 

What sucks is that it's rather large for a microwave and it's mounted above the stove top set into the upper cabinets. It's somewhat heavy,  very awkward to reach and a real pain in the ass to get out of it's hole. Plus, if dropped, it would most definitely shatter the glass cook  top.

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Once down, I expected the rest to be easy since I'd replaced two of the three switches before. However, I'd forgotten how nasty these things get inside since it doubles as a vent hood. I spent a good hour taking it slowly apart and thoroughly cleaning it. I didn't take any pictures pre-cleaning. You'll have to use your imagination.

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Word of warning ⚠️, microwaves do carry high voltage,  so if you're going to try to repair one,  know how to make it safe. It's very easy really. Make certain it's unplugged and discharge the capacitor, which will hold a charge for quite a while,  by sticking a pair of rubber handled needle nose pliers into each of the terminals. Youtube it if that's confusing.

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So, door switches... there are actually 3 on mine and honestly I can't remember exactly what each of them does. One activates the light,  one tells the board that the door is shut. Those two are the same type of two pole switches (black in the image below) and the third is called an interlock switch and has three poles but only has leads on two of them (white in the image below). On each switch there's a little plunger that opens or closes the circuit. When you open your microwave door, those rounded hooks on the door are what depresses that plunger.

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So,  I began by breaking out the multimeter and testing continuity on the top two switches since that's what went out before. You put a lead on each pole, open the door, close the door. Is there a change in the reading? Yes, switch should be good. No, switch is bad.

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The bottom switch was no change,  cool replace and test by plugging the microwave in and opening the door. Aaaannnddd the microwave comes on... wtf? Pick up the "bad" switch, test it with the multimeter, it works! Ok, unplug and discharge the capacitor. Since I bought two switches, I go ahead and replace the top. Test with the multimeter, door open, door shut, it works. Test the 2nd one that I previously replaced. Door open, door shut, wtf, new switch doesn't work! I pull both the top and bottom switches again and test them again with the multimeter, both work. I test both the old ones, wtf, they both work too! I've got a short somewhere it seems. That's not good. Praying it's not a board because that's likely not worth fixing. So, without putting the other switches back in I decide to test the interlock switch with the multimeter and IT tests bad. Then it clicks,  "interlock" switch... it's in the same circuit as the first switch I replaced. THAT'S what's giving me the faulty reading. So I go to pull that switch,  the white 3-pole switch and this is what I find:

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Yeah,  that ain't right... The bad thing is that I didn't order that switch. I never could find it on any schematic for my microwave, so I'd hoped one of the switches that went bad before was needing replacement again.  I tried looking up the part number that is stamped on the side,  but no luck there either. I looked up the manufacturer of the switch and they had one,  but it was a 10 amp and mine is a 15. So, I looked up thw 10 amp switch part number and found another dealer that actually had the 15 amp switch. I took that part number,  went to Amazon and they have it for just $4. Amazon says they can get it to me in 5-7 days :fingerscrossed:, but I'm going to check the local appliance repair shop and see if they have it first. 

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Update on the microwave: I tried...

 

I got all the right parts, got everything put back together and ready to test. I hit the button turn the microwave on and the breaker trips. I reset the breaker and pug into another outlet on another circuit that's not being used by much. Hit the button to turn on the microwave & POP! I check the breaker & it's still good. I check the outlet with a work light & it's got power, but the microwave is still dead. It seems the fuse on the microwave blew, which tells me there's another short somewhere, which is probably what melted the switch in the first place.

 

At this point I feel like it's unsafe to use even if I can figure out where the short is because I don't know what else may be damaged. And given the microwave is 15 years old, I don't want to spend the money that it'll cost at a repair shop. I think it's time to put this one to the curb for the scrappers and we're going out tomorrow to see if we can the replacement we want. Crossing fingers it's actually stocked and we don't have to wait months for it to come in. 

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Good luck finding the exact model you want, or at least one that fits that application. I use my microwave a lot, and have had to replace them sooner with each item. I think one did just stop working, but a couple had issues with the door latching properly, so I've paid attention to that mechanism more in later purchases. Also made sure to step up to 1100 watts from something lower. 

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2 hours ago, stevegrab said:

Good luck finding the exact model you want, or at least one that fits that application. I use my microwave a lot, and have had to replace them sooner with each item. I think one did just stop working, but a couple had issues with the door latching properly, so I've paid attention to that mechanism more in later purchases. Also made sure to step up to 1100 watts from something lower. 

The good thing is we have a spare right now from my daughters dorm if we need to order the one we want. It's just going to be a hugh pain to get to it and unbox it from the attic. But I'd rather do that than settle for something we won't be satisfied with for the next 15 years. 

Edited by rajncajn

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Just so used to having and using them, I recall last time mine stopped working (it made some odd noises then just stopped), I was like "now how do I reheat the other half a pot of coffee tomorrow morning? Oh right, a pot on the stove...

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I am about as un-handy as they come.  I fumble around with anything I try doing that's "handy".  Like I alluded to in the gun thread, where my dad wasn't a gun guy, he also wasn't really handy either.  So I just never learned how to do anything like that.  

 

The wife and I retrofit a backyard shed into a chicken coop when we lived in Austin.  That's about it.  And the wife did a lot :lol:  Oh, and we found a HUGH snake living in it while under construction.  That was scary.  Oh, and we remodeled a bathroom in that same house.  It didn't amount to much.... just demo (which I CAN do!) and re-tiling the walls.  We did have a handyman come and hook up the plumbing on the new vanity.  We did a great job.

 

I figure that people are just good at what they're good at.  I have no problem hiring someone to do something I can't.  I mean,I get hired to do things that others can't, why can't the inverse be true?  I think my wife gets frustrated with me that I'm not handy and have no inclination to try.  I'm almost 50 and won't change.

 

I find that I can fix things from time to time, but most of the time I'm just a bumbling maroon.  :sad:

 

I'm envious of you guys (and gals!  Hi Bunzie!  :heart:) that are able to do projects and be "handy".  It just isn't me.

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13 hours ago, darin3 said:

I am about as un-handy as they come.  I fumble around with anything I try doing that's "handy".  Like I alluded to in the gun thread, where my dad wasn't a gun guy, he also wasn't really handy either.  So I just never learned how to do anything like that.  

 

The wife and I retrofit a backyard shed into a chicken coop when we lived in Austin.  That's about it.  And the wife did a lot :lol:  Oh, and we found a HUGH snake living in it while under construction.  That was scary.  Oh, and we remodeled a bathroom in that same house.  It didn't amount to much.... just demo (which I CAN do!) and re-tiling the walls.  We did have a handyman come and hook up the plumbing on the new vanity.  We did a great job.

 

I figure that people are just good at what they're good at.  I have no problem hiring someone to do something I can't.  I mean,I get hired to do things that others can't, why can't the inverse be true?  I think my wife gets frustrated with me that I'm not handy and have no inclination to try.  I'm almost 50 and won't change.

 

I find that I can fix things from time to time, but most of the time I'm just a bumbling maroon.  :sad:

 

I'm envious of you guys (and gals!  Hi Bunzie!  :heart:) that are able to do projects and be "handy".  It just isn't me.

 

Similar here, dad wasn't handy and neither were most of my older brothers. Sure we'd tinker on our bikes or skateboard, but we weren't builders or mechanical people. One of my older brothers did a bit more as an adult, but I wasn't around for most of that. 

 

Only area I did acquire some skills was when I started riding motorcycles over 20 years ago, in my mid 30s. Never changed oil on a car, did any sort of other maintenance, not even sure I had replaced a flat tire (had AAA when started driving and still do today). Anyway as I saw the costs associated with riding, new tires once or twice a year, oil change every season etc. I decided I should learn to do some things myself. I read some things in the manual for my first bike and gave it a try. I remove tires and take them to the dealer to have new ones mounted, saves me about half the cost, and I could drop them off at lunch and come back later without an appointment vs. maybe waiting a couple hours with an appt. Some people I know have tire mounting equipment and do that part themselves, that's beyond me. I do oil changes, stripped the drain plug the first time, learned a good lesson there. I do some other simple things, replacing a chain, brake pads or rotors. Don't even like dealing with brake fluid, and usually stay away from electrical and engine stuff. (I have added some simple electric items like a GPS or charging outlet.) 

 

I wish I had the desire when I was younger, or had role models around to learn from. I have friends who always say "you could do that" and I reply, "no you could, I don't have the skills and knowledge that comes with decades of doing it, often since they were teenagers or in their early 20s.

 

I'm even worse around the house, just worried I'll destroy something and make it worse. I make a good salary and don't have a ton of expenses as a bachelor. I know many people with these skills because they had to, or they grew up in a home that had to do more on their own, because they did not have the money to just pay somebody to do that. I admire that 

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On 1/21/2022 at 5:45 AM, stevegrab said:

 

Similar here, dad wasn't handy and neither were most of my older brothers. Sure we'd tinker on our bikes or skateboard, but we weren't builders or mechanical people. One of my older brothers did a bit more as an adult, but I wasn't around for most of that. 

 

Only area I did acquire some skills was when I started riding motorcycles over 20 years ago, in my mid 30s. Never changed oil on a car, did any sort of other maintenance, not even sure I had replaced a flat tire (had AAA when started driving and still do today). Anyway as I saw the costs associated with riding, new tires once or twice a year, oil change every season etc. I decided I should learn to do some things myself. I read some things in the manual for my first bike and gave it a try. I remove tires and take them to the dealer to have new ones mounted, saves me about half the cost, and I could drop them off at lunch and come back later without an appointment vs. maybe waiting a couple hours with an appt. Some people I know have tire mounting equipment and do that part themselves, that's beyond me. I do oil changes, stripped the drain plug the first time, learned a good lesson there. I do some other simple things, replacing a chain, brake pads or rotors. Don't even like dealing with brake fluid, and usually stay away from electrical and engine stuff. (I have added some simple electric items like a GPS or charging outlet.) 

 

I wish I had the desire when I was younger, or had role models around to learn from. I have friends who always say "you could do that" and I reply, "no you could, I don't have the skills and knowledge that comes with decades of doing it, often since they were teenagers or in their early 20s.

 

I'm even worse around the house, just worried I'll destroy something and make it worse. I make a good salary and don't have a ton of expenses as a bachelor. I know many people with these skills because they had to, or they grew up in a home that had to do more on their own, because they did not have the money to just pay somebody to do that. I admire that 

 

Yeah when I was younger - and to some degree now - I am OK with bikes.  I had a buddy in HS who did all sorts of work on bikes and kinda just followed his lead.  Now, if one of my kids' bikes has an issue, there's a good chance I can fix it or at minimum diagnose what's wrong.

 

As for cars, though, I'm an idiot there too.  I remember helping a HS buddy change the oil in his car once and it took an entire afternoon.  Since then I figure why not pay someone $20 to do it right, in less than an hour, and I don't have to deal with disposal.

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1 minute ago, darin3 said:

 

Yeah when I was younger - and to some degree now - I am OK with bikes.  I had a buddy in HS who did all sorts of work on bikes and kinda just followed his lead.  Now, if one of my kids' bikes has an issue, there's a good chance I can fix it or at minimum diagnose what's wrong.

 

As for cars, though, I'm an idiot there too.  I remember helping a HS buddy change the oil in his car once and it took an entire afternoon.  Since then I figure why not pay someone $20 to do it right, in less than an hour, and I don't have to deal with disposal.

 

An entire afternoon to do an oil change is way too long, was your buddy letting the cold oil drain slowly on its own. Or drinking a case of beer while he did it. (Some guys love to drink while working in the garage, I prefer to do that when I'm done.)

 

I usually run the motor for a while, then start the work. On some of my motorcycles it is very simple to get to the filter and drain plug, on others you have to remove pieces of body work, maybe the radiator, and oil gets all over the header pipes making a stinky smoky mess when you start it. 

 

Even on the more complex bikes, I can be done in about 2 hours tops, an hour on the simple one. Bikes can also be a bit easier to work on with more things visible and exposed, don't need a lift to get under it etc. I was surprised to see an easily accessible oil filter on my Outback, sits on a little shelf like area in the engine compartment. Of course the drain plug has to be on the bottom of the motor. 

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1 hour ago, stevegrab said:

 

An entire afternoon to do an oil change is way too long, was your buddy letting the cold oil drain slowly on its own. Or drinking a case of beer while he did it. (Some guys love to drink while working in the garage, I prefer to do that when I'm done.)

 

 


I dunno ... it was 30 years ago :lol: 

 

I just remember it took awhile and I came away thinking "this sucks, I will never do this for myself".  

  • Haha 1

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Nothing ever is a simple, quick job...

 

I picked up our new microwave Sunday morning from Best Buy and brought it home. I'd already removed the old microwave to work on it, so no problem there, but the old mounting bracket was still attached to the back side of the wall and needed to be removed still. Now, the way my microwave is attached is slightly different than normal. Typically, you're attaching to an existing wall and cabinets overhead. However, since my oven & microwave are basically on a peninsula that separates my kitchen & living room, all there is there is a box overhead that the cabinets are attached to and a faux half-wall that consists of a sheet of plywood with a drywall facade. When I installed the last microwave, wanting to make certain it was secure, I bolted the bracket through the plywood and just covered the locknuts on the other side with the drywall. I'm sure at the time I thought, well, how many times in my lifetime am I going to have to take the thing down? :bash:After much unscrewing, prying, cursing and finally getting the dremmel tool out and going through almost every cutting and grinding tool tip I had left I was finally able to cut the screw heads off and remove the bracket. I then cut the remaining screw studs so the would be flush and there they will stay until someone when I'm long gone decides they want to remodel. I figure I'll give someone a good laugh.

 

Step two is to take the, basically, newspaper template and tape it up to show where the new bracket will install. So, I lay the template on the wall and the damn sheet of plywood it's supposed to attach to doesn't go far enough down for the template to screw into. :bash:After some more cursing and a bit of thinking I went to the home store and got some flat brackets. I bolted the flat brackets to the mounting bracket and was able to screw the flat brackets to the plywood.

 

The last step in mounting is preparing the overhead for the cord to run through and the top mounting bolts to attach. Of course nothing lines up with the old holes, so again, I'm trying to stick a paper template into the overhead to get everything lined up. Which isn't very easy because I've got to reach over the counter on a step stool and can't put too much weight on the glass range top. What I ended up doing was cutting the side of the cardboard box out and squaring up the template to that. Made it much easier. I then use my farming square and measure out all the holes from the template and mark with a pencil. Then I place the template attached to the cardboard and use a tack pushed through the cardboard to double-check my measurements and everything is spot on, but I notice another issue. The cabinet over head is just a 6" high row of several slide-out boxes. It's really just there as a decorative piece because it's too high up to store anything in without having to get on a step stool and pull the box all the way out. I also had to modify the furthest out drawer so that the microwave cord could run through. Well, the issue now is that the cord comes through at the next 6" square box over. That's fine for drilling out the hole for the new cord to go up into, but now I have to figure out how to drill a hole in the board that separates the two boxes so that I can fish the new cord through to the outlet. :bash:

 

By that time it's already getting late and I have to get everything picked up and clean. I'm hoping that I can get this new issue figured out this evening. If so, wish me luck that everything aligns properly and I'm up and running again.

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