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Question for rabid homers


Homey123
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I'm sure I'm gonna get my a$$ flamed for this but I'd like to know.

 

McBoog's favorite team post prompts the question. How does one become such a rabid homer that s/he cries when their team loses? Can hardly sleep before a playoff game with her/his team playing? Or feels compelled to post ~100 times over the course of a week about how great his/her team is? Or feels so frustrated after a loss or bad call that s/he has to act out like throwing batteries at players/refs (may be alcohol fueled)? Or uses the term "we" when speaking of the team? Since I haven't seen Tom Brady or Jeff Lurie posting here, it's safe to say that usually "we" are not on the team nor do "we" have an equity position in the team. Frequently, "we" do not even go to the games in person although "we" might have one or more pieces of NFL apparel.

 

It seems to me that most people roughly allocate their time and energy as follows:

 

1. Family

2. Friends

3. Religion

4. Job

5. Hobbies

 

Sooooo.....question to rabid homers...

 

Are you incredibly energetic and put as much energy into family, friends, religion, and job as your team or are your priorities different?

 

If they're different, I'm curious, how do you rank your priorities? I'm just curious, how this happens.

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It seems to me that most people roughly allocate their time and energy as follows:

 

1.  Family

2.  Friends

3.  Religion

4.  Job

5.  Hobbies

 

670593[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

I don't partake in #3 so move #4 and #5 up one each.

 

Football is included in #5 which is now #4. Fortunately, #4 also includes #1 and #2 for me since they like football as well. #3 understands unless it is life or death, leave me alone one single day a week from late August to early February.

 

Easy really.

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Are you incredibly energetic and put as much energy into family, friends, religion, and job as your team or are your priorities different?

 

670593[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

I'm no homer, nor a psychologist, but I don't think that it's at all a stretch to assume that homerism and identity with a team makes up for the deficiencies one experiences with #1, #2, and #3 on the list (family, friends, and religion).

 

That's not to say that homers have crappy families, friends, and spirituality, but there is some need being met there...

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I'm sure I'm gonna get my a$$ flamed for this but I'd like to know.

 

McBoog's favorite team post prompts the question.  How does one become such a rabid homer that s/he cries when their team loses?  Can hardly sleep before a playoff game with her/his team playing?  Or feels compelled to post ~100 times over the course of a week about how great his/her team is?  Or feels so frustrated after a loss or bad call that s/he has to act out like throwing batteries at players/refs (may be alcohol fueled)?  Or uses the term "we" when speaking of the team?  Since I haven't seen Tom Brady or Jeff Lurie posting here, it's safe to say that usually "we" are not on the team nor do "we" have an equity position in the team.  Frequently, "we" do not even go to the games in person although "we" might have one or more pieces of NFL apparel.

 

It seems to me that most people roughly allocate their time and energy as follows:

 

1.  Family

2.  Friends

3.  Religion

4.  Job

5.  Hobbies

 

Sooooo.....question to rabid homers...

 

Are you incredibly energetic and put as much energy into family, friends, religion, and job as your team or are your priorities different?

 

If they're different, I'm curious, how do you rank your priorities?  I'm just curious, how this happens.

 

670593[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

What you fail to recognize here, and this should be the end-all of this "debate", is the fact that sports INTEGRATES ITSELF into:

 

1. Friends

2. Family

 

and..

 

5. Hobbies

 

So it's quite easy to see how these "rabid homers" can appear so passionate.

 

P.S. Enough about the "we" argument, Jim Rome. WE have heard it before.

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I would get pretty worked up over the Cowboys when I was younger, I remember the loss to the 49ers in the NFC Championship game that featured" the catch" left me feeling really bad for weeks. But now that I'm older, looking back on it, the memory of that seems pretty dang silly. Some of the tough moments life can throw at you from time to time can put the sports fan thing in perspective real quick.

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1. Family

2. Friends

3. Religion

4. Job

5. Hobbies

 

 

I try to tie of them into football except for work, unless I am taking a client to the game. And yes, football is a religion!!

 

I put 6 days a week into my family, friends and job so if they want to join me from August through Feb. on the seventh day they are more than welcome!

 

:D

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Actually, I don’t think Homey123 is addressing any of those who have posted. Good thread! But, the people that need to address this will be too scared or stoopid to even know where to begin to answer this or that you are even talking to them! :D

 

I place people like Ugl E Tuna (Classic Grits B) ) and those freak Raider fans you see on TV as people that have to live vicariously through the lives and success of others because they are just, in their own eyes, falling short in their lives as to what they want to accomplish, be, reach for or fulfill. We have then in San Diego too (more now than the previous few years).

 

When Gibson knocked down that pass to end the game in the 94/95 playoff game between the Chargers and the Steelers that enabled the Chargers to go to the Super Bowl, I actually let out a sob of joy! My wife, who was only just warming up to football at the time, didn’t fully understand how much the game meant to me until that moment. It also scared me, because I also realized that it meant way too much to me. I was no longer able to play, was coaching (not pro), but somehow felt that “my being a fan” made a difference. The rest of that day, I spent reflecting on the fact that, if I had not watched the game on TV, the game would probably have still played out exactly the same way! It was their accomplishment, and “we”, meaning “I”, had nothing to do with it (despite what the NFL says to suck you in).

 

Being a fan of the Patriots or the Bengals does not make you any better or worse than those other fans. Unless you are coaching, scouting, running or playing, YOU HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THE SUCCESS OR FAILURE OF YOUR TEAM. If you go to a game and think you helped by screaming yourself hoarse, you are sick and need help. There is another goofball willing to pay the same money you paid, for your seat, to scream his/herself hoarse as well. That is why you won’t see me come on these boards and talk “smack” before or after a game. They play for my enjoyment, not my ego or sense of self-worth.

 

:D

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For me it's :

 

1) Religion (as I got older this one got to be #1 on the list)

2) family

3) friends

4) job

5) football

6) other sports, hobbies, etc.

 

Not a tough ranking for me really.

Edited by Chargerz
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For me it's :

 

1) Religion (as I got older this one got to be #1 on the list)

2) family

3) friends

4) job

5) football

6) other sports, hobbies, etc.

 

Not a tough ranking for me really.

 

670730[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

:D

 

I don't quite get it...how can you spend the most time/energy on religion?

 

If you work 8 hours a day, as most of us do, how can you spend more time/energy on religion, family and friends than work? Are you in church for 10 hours with your family and friends? Do you say prayers for your family and friends while you work?

 

There's just not enough time. :D

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For me it's :

 

1) Religion (as I got older this one got to be #1 on the list)

2) family

3) friends

4) job

5) football

6) other sports, hobbies, etc.

 

Not a tough ranking for me really.

 

670730[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Ditto for me.

 

I have been through a bunch over the past 27 months. A brain injury playing softball, two surgeries, months of speech therapy, 3 1/2 months of short-term leave and through the whole thing, I knew that God was looking over me. I had the support of my family and many friends (including several friends here in the Huddle) and much support from colleagues at work that brought food, money, gift certificates, etc. until I returned to work. The Bank was terrific and I was paid for the entire time that I was out. Don't get me wrong, I love my Panthers and feel the "pain" when they lose or don't play well, but I get over it pretty quickly given it is a small part of the BIG PICTURE.

 

It is very possible to be a BIG Homer, but have your total priorities in the correct order. :D

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I don't partake in #3 so move #4 and #5 up one each. 

 

Football is included in #5 which is now #4.  Fortunately, #4 also includes #1 and #2 for me since they like football as well.  #3 understands unless it is life or death, leave me alone one single day a week from late August to early February.

 

Easy really.

 

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What he said, sorta.

 

Here is Pittsburgh, the Steelers are religion. That religion is passed from parents to children (affecting family), and largely influences friendships. Most employers in the area not only respect the right to practice that religion, but encourage it. As it affects all different sorts of people here, I don't think you can say sport makes up for deficiencies in family, friends, etc.

 

Just look at the Olympics, or any other international event. Americans get out the red, white, and blue, and take great pride in our country's accomplishments.

 

It is no different with a city. There is only one thing all Pittsburghers have in common - living in Pittsburgh. Celebrating the things that unite us, i.e., our sports teams, is a wonderful thing. It is something "we" all agree about.

 

And if you don't get emotionally involved in the success and failure of your team, what's the point in following the sport?

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The rest of that day, I spent reflecting on the fact that, if I had not watched the game on TV, the game would probably have still played out exactly the same way!

 

670706[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

How can you ever be sure?

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What he said, sorta.

 

Here is Pittsburgh, the Steelers are religion. 

 

And if you don't get emotionally involved in the success and failure of your team, what's the point in following the sport?

 

670779[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

1. I don't know what that says about Pittsburgh. I suppose that Pittsburgh being Pittsburgh, most people are natives. How many people have you heard say..."Man, when I grow up, I wanna move to Pittsburgh!!!"

 

I was there, once, in 1987. It didn't seem that homogeneous (such that everyone would agree that the Steelers are religion) but it's hard to know much about a place in a day or two.

 

2. For myself, I can enjoy the competition, the fact that the game is played on multiple levels, physical and mental. And the astounding physical feats the athletes pull off. I just like to see a well played, well coached game. I don't have to get emotionally involved to follow the sport.

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Well, for me it is simple:

 

1. God

2. Family

3. Friends

4. Work

5. Hobbies

 

 

I'm probably one of the rabid fans you are talking about. I love the Steelers and make no apologies for it. However, it would shock everyone to know how little it brings me down when they lose. I don't mope around at all. I was fine last night, my wife, who isn't into football 1/500th that I am was more upset than me. Of course I was disappointed, but trust me, IT IS ONLY FOOTBALL. My biggest disappointment is that the fun ride this year was now over and I wasn't going to get to see MY Steelers play in the Super Bowl. Yes, MY Steelers. I am a strong supporter of this team, no one is delusional and thinks they are a part of a team. When they see "we", they are referring to their favorite team and their fans, which we are a part of. I don't understand why that bothers people so much.

 

Don't ever think you know someone based on how much they love their teams or post about their teams on a message board. The distance between my realtionship with my God, My Family, and My Friends are SO FAR ahead of my fandom for my teams and to be honest a great distance from my committment to work, nothing compares. I've always said, if you are lying in your death bed, you're not going to be thinking about you work through the years, I know I will be thinking of my Family and Friends, and I YES, I would guess that I would remincise about some great moments in my life and they might include some football. If that makes me a loser in anyone's eyes, then so be it.

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1.  I don't know what that says about Pittsburgh.  I suppose that Pittsburgh being Pittsburgh, most people are natives.  How many people have you heard say..."Man, when I grow up, I wanna move to Pittsburgh!!!"

 

I was there, once, in 1987.  It didn't seem that homogeneous (such that everyone would agree that the Steelers are religion) but it's hard to know much about a place in a day or two.

 

2.  For myself, I can enjoy the competition, the fact that the game is played on multiple levels, physical and mental.  And the astounding physical feats the athletes pull off.  I just like to see a well played, well coached game.  I don't have to get emotionally involved to follow the sport.

 

670799[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Well, Homey123, you obviously have it figured out, and we can all simply try to get things together like you have. Thanks for trying to show us the way. :D

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:D

 

I don't quite get it...how can you spend the most time/energy on religion?

 

If you work 8 hours a day, as most of us do, how can you spend more time/energy on religion, family and friends than work? Are you in church for 10 hours with your family and friends? Do you say prayers for your family and friends while you work?

 

There's just not enough time. :D

 

670758[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Religion does not necessarily mean going to church. A few minutes of quiet reflection during one's lunch hour can mean quite a bit. I work ~ 60 hours per week and go to church maybe twice a month. But that doesn't make me less "religious" than those wackos in the Middle East who sit on a rug and face Mecca multiple times per day.

 

And for the record...

 

1. Family

2. Friends

3. Religion

4. Work

5. Everything else

Edited by Bill Swerski
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1.  I don't know what that says about Pittsburgh.  I suppose that Pittsburgh being Pittsburgh, most people are natives.  How many people have you heard say..."Man, when I grow up, I wanna move to Pittsburgh!!!"

 

I was there, once, in 1987.  It didn't seem that homogeneous (such that everyone would agree that the Steelers are religion) but it's hard to know much about a place in a day or two.

 

670799[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

It's not very homogeneous - that's my point. The only thing we all have in common is the city. Celebrating the city, and it's biggest claim to fame - the Steelers, unifies us. This brotherhood/sisterhood is a positive thing, win or lose. It is a connection we all share.

 

And you are right - few people move to Pittsburgh. Many, many people move away. But they take something with them when they leave - a love of the Steelers. There are Steelers bars all over the country where former 'Burghers go to celebrate their religion. We're all proud of our heritage, and like to celebrate it, much as you see with people celebrating their Irish, German, Italian, etc. heritage.

 

2.  For myself, I can enjoy the competition, the fact that the game is played on multiple levels, physical and mental.  And the astounding physical feats the athletes pull off.  I just like to see a well played, well coached game.  I don't have to get emotionally involved to follow the sport.

 

670799[/snapback]

 

 

 

That is all well and good, but it's so cold and clinical. I too enjoy watching a good game being played by teams with which I have no personal connection. But it can't compare to thrill of watching my city's team, and my city's players - dudes you'll run into at a restaurant, who contribute to the local community. That connection heightens the experience.

 

I don't see why it is so hard to understand, particularly when you can understand it with college teams. What do you have in common with the players on your college's team other than that you went to the same college?

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Celebrating the city, and it's biggest claim to fame - the Steelers, unifies us.

 

And you are right - few people move to Pittsburgh.  Many, many people move away. 

 

670827[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating moving away from Pittsburgh? Just kidding.

 

And the college vs pro city thing. I guess it's just perspective. To me, college is a community. And the students have a lot more in common than people who live in a large NFL city. In fact, most NFL cities are so big that it doesn't seem likely that they have the sense of community that even a big university (60,000 students) has.

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I believe my passion for the game has stemmed alot from my not being able to play the game. I had brain surgery as a freshman in high school to cure seizures and for some reason the doctor would never let me play football. It was ironic because I never had siezures until I decided to go out for football my freshman year. The doctor told me that if I would have been hit just right, it would have killed me instantly.

 

my priorities are as follows:

1. religion (see above if you doubt that God has no control in our lives. plus I have many other reasons or events in my life that have led me to this)

2. family (no matter what my better half says, I will miss a game if I have to for a family outing, I just try to make sure that I don't have to and I have her trained enough to know not to schedule anything for Sundays)

3. Career

4. Hobby (fantasy football and football)

 

I am very disappointed when my Vikings lose, but I am not going to kill myself over it, plus after as many disappointments as us Viking fans have been through, I have started to become numb to it.

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And the college vs pro city thing.  I guess it's just perspective.  To me, college is a community.  And the students have a lot more in common than people who live in a large NFL city.  In fact, most NFL cities are so big that it doesn't seem likely that they have the sense of community that even a big university (60,000 students) has.

 

670846[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Pittsburgh is a pretty small city, and we do have a pretty strong sense of community, thanks in large part to our Steelers.

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Pittsburgh is a pretty small city, and we do have a pretty strong sense of community, thanks in large part to our Steelers.

 

670854[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

According to the 2000 census, Pittsburgh's metro population was 2.3 million. Are that many people moving away?

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According to the 2000 census, Pittsburgh's metro population was 2.3 million.  Are that many people moving away?

 

670857[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

The metro area includes most of Western PA. :D

 

There are a lot of people leaving, one way or another. Just recently it was announced that more people were leaving Pittsburgh (moving away or dying) than were being born. The city has been shrinking since the steel mills closed.

 

 

Yeah, H8, they used a lot of that deadly asbestos in those steel mills.

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:D

 

I don't quite get it...how can you spend the most time/energy on religion?

 

If you work 8 hours a day, as most of us do, how can you spend more time/energy on religion, family and friends than work? Are you in church for 10 hours with your family and friends? Do you say prayers for your family and friends while you work?

 

There's just not enough time. :D

 

670758[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

 

Religion does not necessarily mean going to church.  A few minutes of quiet reflection during one's lunch hour can mean quite a bit.  I work ~ 60 hours per week and go to church maybe twice a month.  But that doesn't make me less "religious" than those wackos in the Middle East who sit on a rug and face Mecca multiple times per day.

 

670808[/snapback]

 

 

 

Bill is right-on with his comments. My prioities are not ranked by total minutes spent per day. They are ranked by their value in my life.

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