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Wunderlic test used at combine


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I remember hearing about potential NFL draftees that scored in the single digits on this test. I just took the thing and can't even imagine someone not being able to get at least a 15. These guys have been "attending" college level classes and passing and they can't pass this thing?

 

I got a 37 and didn't even finish the last few questions. Who knows what players have scored on this test?

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If the test is to have any idea what you're talking about, I fail.

 

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LOL. It is a supposed intelligence and logic test that NFL teams use at the combine. I remember hearing that Ricky Williams scored like a 6 on this thing.

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Didn't Javon Walker do amazingly poorly on this test? I think that lineman tend to score best as a group, which I find interesting.

 

If you hang around a bit, there's bound to be a sample test posted somewhere right around combine time.

 

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Yeah, I think JWalk bombed. But we're not paying him to be smart.

 

Also, FWIW, I think Eli Manning absolutely killed it - 40+.

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Notables:

 

Steve Young 33

Dan Marino 14

Jeff George 10

Brett Favre 22

Steve McNair 15

Donovan McNabb 16, 12

Daunte CUlpepper 18, 21, 15

Marc Bulger 29

Tom Brady 33

Michael Vick 20

Byron Leftwich 25

Ben Roethlisberger 25

Eli Manning 39

Peyton Manning ???

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I wonder how it's scored.  Found a 15 question sample on Page 2 - it was ridiculously easy.

 

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It is scored pretty simply. There are 50 questions. You get 12.5 minutes to take it. Every question you get right is one point. I can't see too many people being able to finish it in that time.

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It is scored pretty simply. There are 50 questions. You get 12.5 minutes to take it. Every question you get right is one point. I can't see too many people being able to finish it in that time.

 

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That's why you gotta identify the ones that will take more than 5 seconds and just move past them for the time being. The majority of the questions look like they require about 2 seconds worth of thought.

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That's why you gotta identify the ones that will take more than 5 seconds and just move past them for the time being.  The majority of the questions look like they require about 2 seconds worth of thought.

 

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If you don't know what the test is all about it is hard to not go in order. I thought about skipping over the longer ones first after I took the test. If I ever take it again, I will do just what you suggested.

 

Wait...then my future employers will expect me to be smart. Can't have that.

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If you don't know what the test is all about it is hard to not go in order. I thought about skipping over the longer ones first after I took the test. If I ever take it again, I will do just what you suggested.

 

Wait...then my future employers will expect me to be smart. Can't have that.

 

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I guess I'm just conditioned to test that way - I've taken way too many timed tests in my life (SATs, LSATs, Bar, etc.) to dwell on questions when there are X amount of questions I may never get to. Depressing.

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Notables:

 

Steve Young 33

Dan Marino 14

Jeff George 10

Brett Favre 22

Steve McNair 15

Donovan McNabb 16, 12

Daunte CUlpepper 18, 21, 15

Marc Bulger 29

Tom Brady 33

Michael Vick 20

Byron Leftwich 25

Ben Roethlisberger 25

Eli Manning 39

Peyton Manning ???

 

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One interesting point that I read somewhere is that some coaches look twice if a QB scores too high, as sometimes they will have a tendency to overthink instead of reacting quickly to make a play...

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One interesting point that I read somewhere is that some coaches look twice if a QB scores too high, as sometimes they will have a tendency to overthink instead of reacting quickly to make a play...

 

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Considering the fact it's a timed test that leaves little room for overthinking, I think that's an odd move for a coach. If anything, overthinking on the Wonderlic would cause you to score lower b/c you won't finish.

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Considering the fact it's a timed test that leaves little room for overthinking, I think that's an odd move for a coach.  If anything, overthinking on the Wonderlic would cause you to score lower b/c you won't finish.

 

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Not overthinking on the wonderlic, overthinking in a game situation. Pay Attention, 'Zac! :D

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Not overthinking on the wonderlic, overthinking in a game situation. Pay Attention, 'Zac!  :D

 

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Huh? Why would performing extremely well on a quick-thinking exercise (i.e. the Wonderlic) indicate that someone would be prone to overthinking in a game situation? That makes no sense - the test is clearly designed to see how well players make decisions in limited timeframes.

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Huh?  Why would performing extremely well on a quick-thinking exercise (i.e. the Wonderlic) indicate that someone would be prone to overthinking in a game situation?  That makes no sense - the test is clearly designed to see how well players make decisions in limited timeframes.

 

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I hear you, but 12 1/2 minutes is a far cry from a split second decision. Like I said, I read it somewhere, it's not my theory, but I think I think the jist is, at game speed you have a small window to make a decision, if you are going through all the various possibilities in your mind instead of acting decisively, time's up: you take a sack, the hole is closed, the receiver is covered, whatever. The higher you score, the more likely you are to devise creative solutions to problems instead of, say, just running the play as called. For an Illustration of a QB overthinking, think of Hasselbeck his first season with the 'Hawks.

 

For an interesting discussion on the Wonderlic test, check out the Book "Bloody Sundays" by Mike Freeman, he covers it pretty well.

Edited by Bonehand
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I hear you, but 12 1/2 minutes is a far cry from a split second decision. Like I said, I read it somewhere, it's not my theory, but I think I think the jist is, at game speed you have a small window to make a decision, if you are going through all the various possibilities in your mind instead of acting decisively, time's up: you take a sack, the hole is closed, the receiver is covered, whatever. For an Illustration of a QB overthinking, think of Hasselbeck his first season with the 'Hawks. 

 

For an interesting discussion on the Wonderlic test, check out the Book "Bloody Sundays" by Mike Freeman, he covers it pretty well.

 

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Gotcha, though it's worth noting that Hass didn't even break 30. Without the benefit of having read Freeman's book, I still say that any coach that even thinks about looking at a high score negatively is on crack. If one is going to separate the quick thinking necessary to score well on the Wonderlic from the split-second decisions required in football, there's no reason to look at the test at all b/c it's neither reflective nor determinative of a player's ability to react in split-second situations. Mayhap I'll take a peek at Freeman's work to see what's what.

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If one is going to separate the quick thinking necessary to score well on the Wonderlic from the split-second decisions required in football, there's no reason to look at the test at all b/c it's neither reflective nor determinative of a player's ability to react in split-second situations. 

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Yeah, it's certainly not indicative of future success. It's pretty interesting that Marino only scored 16 while Rick Mirer scored 31.

 

Added: Sebastian Janikowski reportedly scored a 9!

Edited by Bonehand
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Yeah, it's certainly not indicative of future success. It's pretty interesting that Marino only scored 16 while Rick Mirer scored 31.

 

Added: Sebastian Janikowski reportedly scored a 9!

 

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I think it's awesome that they even give the test to kickers - what're they afraid of? A kicker will be so dumb that he'll kick the ball in the wrong direction because he can't decide on the correct direction in the limited time he's given? I'm picturing SeBas cracking under the pressure of a last minute FG and turning and kicking the ball out of bounds at the 25 yard line.

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