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RC94

RC94's Cooking and Recipe Thread

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Aside from fantasy football, cooking is one of my favorite hobbies. I thought I would start a thread to talk about cooking and share recipes. I have tons of recipes so if you have any requests I will do my best to provide you some good ones. I will also post some of my favorites, some that I am currently working on, and some things I have found that could be helpful learning tools and techniques. Everyone please feel free to post your favorite recipes, and your thoughts about your cooking tools and cooking techniques.

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Here is some info about cutlery, knife maintenance, cutting boards, and cutting techniques with different types of knives. Alton Brown did a "Good Eats" episode about this and I thought it would be useful to everyone (in 2 parts on youtube):

 

Part 1

 

Part 2

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Here is a recipe that is very popular with my friends. I love this potato side dish and make it all the time:

 

Garlic and Rosemary Roasted Potatoes

(1 ½ pounds of potatoes makes approximately 4 servings)

 

Ingredients

- 1 ½ pounds of small red or white-skinned potatoes (or a mixture) (I use fingerling or red bliss)

- 1/8 to 1/4 cup good olive oil (use enough to coat all of the potatoes. I never measure it)

- 1 teaspoon kosher salt (or to taste - I tend to use a little more salt since salt goes well with potatoes)

- 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper (or use amount you like)

- 1 teaspoon garlic salt (or use amount you like)

- 1 teaspoon onion powder (or use amount you like)

- 6 - 8 cloves of minced garlic (I sometimes use more since I love garlic)

- 3 sprigs (or sticks) of minced fresh rosemary leaves (remove from stems and mince)

 

Note – I never measure out each ingredient so the above is mainly approximations. You don’t need to be exact with the measurements and you can make changes to your taste.

 

Directions

- Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

 

- Cut the potatoes in half or thirds or quarters depending on the size of the potato and place in a large bowl with the olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic salt, onion powder, minced garlic, and rosemary.

 

- Toss until the potatoes are well coated, then place the potatoes on a baking sheet and spread out into 1 layer. Make sure to coat the potatoes with the oil, garlic, rosemary, and seasonings still on the bottom of the bowl after you place the potatoes on the baking sheet.

 

- Roast in the oven for 30 minutes, flip and then another 30 minutes. They should be browned and crisp on the outside and soft on the inside.

 

- Remove the potatoes from the oven, season with salt, pepper or whatever you want to taste, and serve.

Edited by RC94

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Here is some info about cutlery, knife maintenance, cutting boards, and cutting techniques with different types of knives. Alton Brown did a "Good Eats" episode about this and I thought it would be useful to everyone (in 2 parts on youtube):

 

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

I liked these a lot, thanks for sharing!

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I liked these a lot, thanks for sharing!

You're welcome! There is plenty more to come, especially recipes.

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I will be making this for dinner this weekend. It goes great with the roasted potatoes I posted earlier. It takes about 3 hours, including prep time but it's not a hard recipe to make. You just need some patience and to plan ahead so you aren't starving by the time it's ready. The vast majority of the time it's braising and doesn't require much from you except to occasionally check on it:

 

 

Short Ribs Braised in Red Wine

 

Ingredients

• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

• 1 medium onion, finely chopped

• 1 large celery rib, finely chopped

• 1 large carrot, finely chopped

• 4 or 5 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

• 2 sprigs of rosemary, removed from the stems and finely chopped

• 2 tablespoons tomato paste

• 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

• One 750-milliliter bottle dry red wine

• 2 cups chicken stock (or veal stock or beef stock)

• 2 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil

• 2 full beef ribs, cut in half to make four 3 or 4 inch-long, 2-inch-thick, short ribs with bone (about 3 pounds - each rib is about 1.5 to 2 pounds including the bone)

• Salt and freshly ground pepper

• Pasta or potatoes, for a side dish

 

Directions:

• In a large, enameled cast-iron casserole or large pot or dutch oven (something that is big enough to fit everything and that can handle cooking for 2+ hours), melt the butter. Add the onion, celery and carrot, cover and cook over moderate heat until slightly softened, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add garlic and rosemary and cook for a few more minutes. Uncover and cook until the vegetables are lightly browned, about 3 to 5 minutes longer. Stir in the tomato paste. Add the flour and cook for 1 minute, stirring. Add the wine and chicken stock and bring to a simmer.

 

• Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet until shimmering. Season the ribs with salt and pepper, add them to the pan and cook over moderately high heat, turning, until they are well browned, about 15 minutes.

 

• Transfer the short ribs to the large pot. Partially cover and cook over moderately low heat until very tender, about 2 hours.

 

• Transfer the ribs to a plate and remove the bones. Strain the sauce into a heatproof measuring cup and skim off the fat. Return the sauce to the casserole and boil until reduced to 2 cups, 10 minutes. Return the meat to the sauce and simmer over low heat until heated through. Serve the ribs with pasta or potatoes.

Edited by RC94

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My parents went to Spain and brought back some saffron. I didn’t have many recipes for using it and I didn’t want to make a big dish like paella so I created this sauce. It goes with a lot of different things. I usually put it over grilled chicken or fish along with pasta or rice. It’s basically my garlic cream sauce with saffron added in. Saffron is very expensive so if you don’t have any but still want to make this as a garlic cream sauce, it’s still great so you can leave out the saffron.

 

Saffron and Garlic Cream Sauce

 

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons of butter

2 – 4 garlic cloves, chopped

1/2 cup dry white wine

1/4 teaspoon saffron threads (a pinch of saffron)

2 cups chicken stock

2 cups heavy cream

2 teaspoons of flour

Salt and freshly ground white pepper

 

I never measure so these amounts are approximations. You can make it to taste.

 

Directions:

• In a saucepan, heat the butter. Add the garlic and cook over moderate heat until golden brown, about 1 minute.

 

• Add in flour and mix thoroughly and cook for another minute. Should be kind of thick but you shouldn’t see any flour alone. It should be mixed in with the melted butter. This makes the sauce thicker. Cook for about 1 minute.

 

• Add the wine and crumble in the saffron. Simmer over moderate heat until the wine has reduced by one-third, about 5 minutes.

 

• Add the chicken stock and boil over high heat until reduced to 1/2 cup, about 15 minutes.

 

• Add the cream and simmer over low heat until reduced to 2 cups, about 10 minutes.

 

• Season with salt and pepper to taste. You can add a teaspoon or so of lemon juice if you want too. Mix it in.

Edited by RC94

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I'd like to serve this for my family on Wednesday. How many does this recipe serve? I don't make short ribs 'cause hubby doesn't like them and he's not with me. So, proportions I don't have a clue. I will be cooking for 6.

 

 

I will be making this for dinner this weekend. It goes great with the roasted potatoes I posted earlier. It takes about 3 hours, including prep time but it's not a hard recipe to make. You just need some patience and to plan ahead so you aren't starving by the time it's ready. The vast majority of the time it's braising and doesn't require much from you except to occasionally check on it:

 

 

Short Ribs Braised in Red Wine

 

Ingredients

• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

• 1 medium onion, finely chopped

• 1 large celery rib, finely chopped

• 1 large carrot, finely chopped

• 4 or 5 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

• 2 sprigs of rosemary, removed from the stems and finely chopped

• 2 tablespoons tomato paste

• 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

• One 750-milliliter bottle dry red wine

• 2 cups chicken stock (or veal stock or beef stock)

• 2 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil

• Four 2-inch-thick, flanken-cut short ribs with bone (2 3/4 pounds)

• Salt and freshly ground pepper

• Pasta or potatoes, for a side dish

 

Directions:

• In a large, enameled cast-iron casserole or large pot or dutch oven (something that is big enough to fit everything and that can handle cooking for 2+ hours), melt the butter. Add the onion, celery and carrot, cover and cook over moderate heat until slightly softened, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add garlic and rosemary and cook for a few more minutes. Uncover and cook until the vegetables are lightly browned, about 3 to 5 minutes longer. Stir in the tomato paste. Add the flour and cook for 1 minute, stirring. Add the wine and chicken stock and bring to a simmer.

 

• Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet until shimmering. Season the ribs with salt and pepper, add them to the pan and cook over moderately high heat, turning, until they are well browned, about 15 minutes.

 

• Transfer the short ribs to the casserole. Partially cover and cook over moderately low heat until very tender, about 2 hours.

 

• Transfer the ribs to a plate and remove the bones. Strain the sauce into a heatproof measuring cup and skim off the fat. Return the sauce to the casserole and boil until reduced to 2 cups, 10 minutes. Return the meat to the sauce and simmer over low heat until heated through. Serve the ribs with pasta or potatoes.

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I'd like to serve this for my family on Wednesday. How many does this recipe serve? I don't make short ribs 'cause hubby doesn't like them and he's not with me. So, proportions I don't have a clue. I will be cooking for 6.

Depending on appetites and side dishes, I would say this serves 3 or 4 people so I would expand the amounts for feeding 6. I think you can feed 6 people on 5 or 6 ribs, but if you serve a good amount of side dishes and other things you can do it with 4. Each rib should be cut in half to fit into the pot (so each half-rib will be about 3 or 4 inches long and 2 inches or so thick). To be safe I would double the amounts in the recipe and use at least 5 full beef ribs (each cut in half). If you still need more liquid to fully immerse the ribs, you can add more chicken stock. I edited the original recipe post to make it more clear.

 

By the way, I am making this for dinner tonight. :wacko:

Edited by RC94

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RC it turned out I didn't make this based on the fact my 83 year old mother wanted salmon and my 83 year old mother gets what she wants!

 

But, I will try this down the road for sure :wacko:

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I have some great salmon recipes too!

 

I hope you enjoy it when you try it. You don't have to use short ribs if you don't want to, by the way. You can use steak instead if you prefer. Ask your butcher about a good cut for braising. I love that recipe and have been making it about once a week lately.

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Here is a tip I learned from Alton Brown's "Good Eats" show on how to dry-age steak, although I have changed it a bit since this one works better for me. Unless you have a special cooler/refrigerator temperature-controlled room that is also humidity-controlled you can’t age steak like the top steakhouses do. This makes the steaks taste great and it’s very easy for normal people like you and me:

 

Wrap the steak (individually) in a paper towel, put it in a plastic bag and then in the refrigerator. You can leave the bag open a little. On the first day or 2 you might want to change the paper towel a couple of times a day after it’s soaked thru, otherwise you can change it once a day. After several days the paper towels will have absorbed enough of the water in the steak to make it more firm and dry. It will taste great, like you would get in a restaurant.

Edited by RC94

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I got this from Food Network. I'm going to try it this week or next:

 

Beer-Braised Chicken

 

Ingredients

1/4 pound slab or thick-cut bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs (about 2 1/2 pounds)

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

All-purpose flour, for dredging

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 (12-ounce) bottle beer (preferably brown ale)

1 cup frozen pearl onions, thawed

1/2 pound small red-skinned new potatoes, halved

2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard

2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar

4 sprigs fresh thyme

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 cup of chicken broth or water

 

Directions

  • Heat a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate.

 

 

  • Season the chicken with salt and pepper and dredge in flour, shaking off the excess. Add the olive oil to the drippings in the pot. Add the chicken in batches and cook over medium-high heat until golden on the bottom, 6 to 7 minutes, then flip and sear the other side, about 1 or 2 minutes.

 

 

  • Add the beer, onions, potatoes, mustard, sugar, thyme and 1 cup water or chicken broth to the pot and stir, making sure the chicken is fully submerged. Simmer until the chicken is cooked through, about 15 minutes. Discard the thyme and stir in the bacon and parsley.

 

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Sugar Magnolia mentioned making salmon and I want to post a variety of recipes and I haven't posted any fish recipes yet, so here is a salmon recipe. I like this one a lot:

 

Pan-Roasted Salmon with Soy-Ginger Glaze

 

Ingredients:

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon honey

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

Four skinless salmon fillets

Freshly ground pepper

Garlic salt

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°.
  2. In a small saucepan, combine the soy sauce and ginger and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and stir in the honey and mustard.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a large nonstick ovenproof skillet. Season the salmon with pepper and garlic salt and add it to the skillet, skinned side up. Cook over high heat until golden and crusty, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn the salmon and spoon the ginger-soy glaze on top. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake the salmon for 5 minutes, or until cooked through. Using a slotted spatula, transfer the salmon fillets to plates, garnish with the cilantro and serve.

 

Edited by RC94

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Here is one of my favorites. I make this often:

 

Seafood Risotto

 

Ingredients:

3 cups bottled clam juice

2 1/2 cups water

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 small onion, finely chopped

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1 1/2 cups arborio rice (10 ounces)

Pinch of saffron threads

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 shallot, minced

1/2 pound cooked shrimp, cut into thirds

1/2 pound lump crab meat, picked over

2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

1/2 cup mascarpone cheese

 

Directions:

In a medium saucepan, combine the clam broth and water and bring to a simmer. Keep warm.

 

In a large saucepan, heat the olive oil. Add the onion, season with salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook for 1 minute, stirring to thoroughly coat. Crumble the saffron into the wine and add it to the rice. Cook, stirring until the wine is absorbed. Add 1 cup of the warm clam juice and cook over moderate heat, stirring constantly, until nearly absorbed. Continue adding the juice 1/2 cup at a time, and stirring constantly until it is nearly absorbed between additions. The risotto is done when the rice is al dente and suspended in a thick, creamy sauce, about 20 minutes total. Season with salt and pepper.

 

Melt the butter in a large skillet. Add the shallot and cook over moderate heat until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the shrimp and crab and cook until just heated through. Scrape the seafood into the risotto and stir in the parsley and mascarpone.

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Made this for dinner tonight. It's an easy recipe and it came out great:

 

Braised Pork with Bacon and Onions

 

Ingredients

2 slices bacon cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips

pork tenderloin

Salt

fresh-ground black pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 or 2 onions, sliced thin

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 cup chicken broth

1 teaspoon wine vinegar

2 bay leaves

1 sprig rosemary, or 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crumbled

 

Directions

1. In a large deep stainless-steel frying pan or a Dutch oven, cook the bacon over moderate heat until crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon. Season the pork with salt and pepper. Increase the heat to moderately high. Put the pork in the pan and brown on all sides, turning, about 8 minutes in all. Remove.

 

2. Reduce the heat to moderate and add the oil to the pan. Add the onions and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden, about 5 minutes. Add the wine and simmer for 3 minutes.

 

3. Stir in the broth, vinegar, cloves, bay leaves, rosemary, salt, and the pork with any accumulated juices. Bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer, turning the meat once, until the pork is just done, about 10 minutes. Remove the meat from the pan, transfer to a carving board, and leave to rest in a warm spot for 5 minutes. Stir pinch of pepper and pinch of salt into the pan and simmer until the sauce thickens slightly, about 3 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and rosemary sprig. Cut the meat into thin slices and serve topped with the sauce.

 

Goes great with my roasted potatoes recipe.

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I found these spice and herb substitution charts and thought you guys would find them useful. I can't seem to post them as a chart so here they are typed out:

 

 

Spice Substitutions:

  • Allspice – Cinnamon; cassia; dash of nutmeg or mace; or dash of cloves
  • Aniseed – Fennel seed or a few drops anise extract
  • Cardamom – Ginger
  • Chili Powder – Dash bottled hot pepper sauce plus a combination of oregano and cumin
  • Cinnamon – Nutmeg or allspice (use only 1/4 of the amount)
  • Cloves – Allspice; cinnamon; or nutmeg
  • Cumin – Chili powder
  • Ginger – Allspice; cinnamon; mace; or nutmeg
  • Mace – Allspice; cinnamon; ginger; or nutmeg
  • Nutmeg – Cinnamon; ginger; or mace
  • Saffron – Dash turmeric (for color)

 

 

 

Herb Substitutions:

  • Basil – Oregano or thyme
  • Chervil – Tarragon or parsley
  • Chive – Green onion; onion; or leek
  • Cilantro – Parsley
  • Italian Seasoning – Blend of any of these: basil, oregano, rosemary, and ground red pepper
  • Marjoram – Basil; thyme; or savory
  • Mint – Basil; marjoram; or rosemary
  • Oregano – Thyme or basil
  • Parsley – Chervil or cilantro
  • Poultry Seasoning – Sage plus a blend of any of these: thyme, marjoram, savory, black pepper, and rosemary
  • Red Pepper – Dash bottled hot pepper sauce or black pepper
  • Rosemary – Thyme; tarragon; or savory
  • Sage – Poultry seasoning; savory; marjoram; or rosemary
  • Savory – Thyme; marjoram; or sage
  • Tarragon – Chervil; dash fennel seed; or dash aniseed
  • Thyme – Basil; marjoram; oregano; or savory

 

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Here is a tip I learned from Alton Brown's "Good Eats" show on how to dry-age steak, although I have changed it a bit since this one works better for me. Unless you have a special cooler/refrigerator temperature-controlled room that is also humidity-controlled you can't age steak like the top steakhouses do. This makes the steaks taste great and it's very easy for normal people like you and me:

 

Wrap the steak (individually) in a paper towel, put it in a plastic bag and then in the refrigerator. You can leave the bag open a little. On the first day or 2 you might want to change the paper towel a couple of times a day after it's soaked thru, otherwise you can change it once a day. After several days the paper towels will have absorbed enough of the water in the steak to make it more firm and dry. It will taste great, like you would get in a restaurant.

 

RC, cool thread, thanks for sharing. Just stumbled upon this and I'm intrigued. Let's say I get a nice fresh cut of ribeye or NY strip and want to dry age it in the fridge using the method above -- the part I've never understood is, how long does it keep? I've heard of steaks being dry aged for 21 days or more, and it made me wonder how the steak doesn't go bad in that period of time.

 

And when it's done, do you prepare it the same way you would a normal steak? For example I would take it out 30 minutes prior to grilling so it warms to room temp, put a crust of kosher salt and black pepper on it, then grill (sear it as hot as possible, then finish on a lower heat off the coals until medium rare). What's your favorite method?

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RC, cool thread, thanks for sharing. Just stumbled upon this and I'm intrigued. Let's say I get a nice fresh cut of ribeye or NY strip and want to dry age it in the fridge using the method above -- the part I've never understood is, how long does it keep? I've heard of steaks being dry aged for 21 days or more, and it made me wonder how the steak doesn't go bad in that period of time.

 

And when it's done, do you prepare it the same way you would a normal steak? For example I would take it out 30 minutes prior to grilling so it warms to room temp, put a crust of kosher salt and black pepper on it, then grill (sear it as hot as possible, then finish on a lower heat off the coals until medium rare). What's your favorite method?

 

 

Thanks. I am happy to share my passion for cooking.

 

As far as how long to keep it, I have kept it for about a week, changing the paper towels everyday and it still comes out great. It gets a little grey looking on the outside but it's still good. I don't think I would keep it much longer than that, though. Steakhouses can age it even longer than 21 days but I have never gone more than a week and since it's just a fridge and not a special dry aging room, I don't think it's worth it to age it much longer.

 

And I cook it pretty much the same way as you. I take it out about a half hour before I start cooking it, I use sea salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder to season it and I like it medium rare. I usually get filet mignon, but sometimes go with the rib eye. I live in a city and don't have a balcony, so no grill. I either broil it or cook it in a pan with some butter to sear it and then put it in the oven for a minute or 2 at 350 degrees to finish cooking the inside. I love it and usually have steak at least once a week. Is that too much?

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By the way, I usually only age it 3 or 4 days, but have gone about a week when I am busy and don't have time to cook it earlier in the week. Even after 4 days there should be a noticeable difference in firmness, density and weight compared to when you first buy it. You will have taken out a good amount of water so it will be firmer, denser and weigh less. But it will also be better tasting since you don't need water in your steak.

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By the way, I usually only age it 3 or 4 days, but have gone about a week when I am busy and don't have time to cook it earlier in the week. Even after 4 days there should be a noticeable difference in firmness, density and weight compared to when you first buy it. You will have taken out a good amount of water so it will be firmer, denser and weigh less. But it will also be better tasting since you don't need water in your steak.

 

Thanks, can't wait to try it.

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I am making these wings today:

 

Asian Wings

 

Ingredients

1/2 cup chopped green onion

1/4 cup honey

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons Asian chili sauce (I use Sriracha)

2 tablespoons oyster sauce

2 tablespoons sesame oil

1 teaspoon ground ginger

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2 pounds chicken wings, cut in 2 pieces at joint

 

Directions:

  • Heat oven to 450 degrees. Grease large baking pan.

 

  • Combine green onion, honey, soy sauce, chili sauce, oyster sauce, sesame oil, ginger and garlic in large bowl. Add wings; toss to coat. Place wings with sauce in single layer in prepared baking pan. Bake, turning occasionally, 25 minutes or until chicken is evenly browned.

 

  • Increase oven temperature to broil. Broil wings 6 inches from heat, turning occasionally, for 8 minutes or until sauce is thick enough to coat back of spoon. Remove wings to platter; spoon sauce over.

 

This recipe is what lead me to find the spice and herb substitution charts. I didn't have ground ginger but I had allspice and thought it would be a good sustitute and the chart I found confirmed it. I love this wings recipe.

Edited by RC94

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Here is a tip I learned from Alton Brown's "Good Eats" show on how to dry-age steak, although I have changed it a bit since this one works better for me. Unless you have a special cooler/refrigerator temperature-controlled room that is also humidity-controlled you can't age steak like the top steakhouses do. This makes the steaks taste great and it's very easy for normal people like you and me:

 

Wrap the steak (individually) in a paper towel, put it in a plastic bag and then in the refrigerator. You can leave the bag open a little. On the first day or 2 you might want to change the paper towel a couple of times a day after it's soaked thru, otherwise you can change it once a day. After several days the paper towels will have absorbed enough of the water in the steak to make it more firm and dry. It will taste great, like you would get in a restaurant.

 

We've done this twice now and the steak has been really delicious. Both times we used filet, and tonight we're doing NY strips for the big game. The strips have good marbling and a nice layer of fat and I plan on doing them almost rare so they will be nice and juicy. One thing about this method is it is very unforgiving if you overcook the meat. Anything past medium rare basically has the dryness/toughness of a well done steak.

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A friend of mine suggested using an aging method his chefs use at the National Cattleman's Association. They buy a sealed tenderloin roll from Costco and throw it in the fridge for an extra 4-5 days. Pretty simple and works pretty well.

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A friend of mine suggested using an aging method his chefs use at the National Cattleman's Association. They buy a sealed tenderloin roll from Costco and throw it in the fridge for an extra 4-5 days. Pretty simple and works pretty well.

 

 

That's called wet aging. If you prefer the way the beef comes out then that works well.

Edited by RC94

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