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For Those in Auction Drafts


StormChasers
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What percentage of budget do you usually allocate to QB, RB and WR?

 

This is my first foray into Auction drafting. Am I way off in allocating...47% to RB, 36% to WR and 10% to QB?

 

It's been my experience with auctions (and that's all I do BTW), that you really can't establish "allocations" like that. Maybe as a guide, but nothing you can realistically marry yourself to.

 

It really just all depends on who is put up for auction and when. For instance, a couple years back when Chad Ochocinco was in his prime, I picked him up for 2.5% simply because he got brought up real late when everyone else was pretty much out of money to bid with.

 

Auctions are real interesting as you need to be fluid. Know how much you have. Know how much the other owners have, etc...

 

You'll love it though for sure.

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It's been my experience with auctions (and that's all I do BTW), that you really can't establish "allocations" like that. Maybe as a guide, but nothing you can realistically marry yourself to.

 

I agree with this. I usually go in with 2-3 scenario's and see how the auction plays out. When a player is thrown out has a ton to do with what their value would be.

 

That said, I do establish some allocations by position:

 

I use 5-8% for QB, 50-60% for RB and 20-25% for WR.

 

One difference with my league is we start 3 RB's. So your numbers look pretty close if you only start 2 RB's.

 

Good luck!

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My first auction year as well.

 

Have any strategies for order of putting players up for auction?

 

My own personal strategy is to put up middle tier type of players that you're willing to take at a low number, but hope some others bid them up. A name like Lendale White or Jonathan Stewart, or a Julius Jones type of name.

 

Thing is though - is that 11 other guys have their own strategies so you have to be able to adjust on the fly.

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My first auction year as well.

 

Have any strategies for order of putting players up for auction?

 

You are going to love the Auction draft format, very addicting! Here is my take on it. I usually have a list of 5 QB's, 10 RB and 10WR that I am targeting and ranked accordingly . If you read the section on Auction stratagy from the Huddle page, you can get an idea of how you need to be fluid moving around your budget.

 

Stratagey is going to change according to how many teams are in the league when offering up people to bid on. If it's a 10 team league, offer op the big money players first and get people to drain their budgets, with only 10 teams there will be a ton of good players you can just out bid people for. If you are playing in a 14 team league like me, you need to throw out the mid tier player you want right away. (Kevin Smith $24 in $200 budget) You can usually get him then for $26 or in that area. If you let him come out natually that is the part of the draft people panic because they don't have their 2nd RB yet and lost out on who they were after. Now Smith is $34!

 

The number one key is to find your values and don't over pay. If you can hang on to some money where you have $20 for the last 5 players, you are in a position of strength and can take whoever you want in the end because everyone else will only be able to afford to spend $1 to $2 for their last 5. Good luck!

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CR has given good advice. Auctions are about all I like to do. It obviates the problem of being stuck at a draft position you don't like.

 

Be very fluid - have an "outline" more than a plan. TIER YOUR PLAYERS!!! Don't get stuck on player A and bid 10% over what you think is max versus looking at five players who you think will be roughly equivalent. Let the other guy overpay. At the same time, if you feel strongly about one particular player in a group don't be afraid to bid an extra dollar on him - just not $20 more.

 

Also, if others are big on one player that you absolutely don't want to take (maybe you think the loss of Harrison will kill Manning this year) then throw those players out early to drain money quickly. Maybe you don't trust the Cardinals to do it again, you'd throw out Fitz/Bouldin and Warner to drain money.

 

Never pay more than $1 (min bid) for a K, or even a D. The K's - well, it's just stupid. And there's always going to be a surprise D or three out there you can pick up.

 

Sit on your sleepers. If you're looking at someone, three or four others in the league are too - guaranteed. Don't try to grab them until most folks are down to minimum bids. Nothing sucks more than losing a sleeper for want of just one more dollar in the bank. And don't overpay for them. They are sleepers for a reason - they might be worthless this year.

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One other thing I would add to this, and though it sounds like I'm being a wise-guy, I'm not:

 

Keep the alcohol consumption in check. You need your bearings intact much moreso in an auction draft than a snaked draft. Every single name that's brought up may be someone you're in play on as opposed to a snaked draft where you might go 20+ picks before you're up again. And if you don't have your game-face on the whole time, you may either bid too high, or miss someone you wanted. Trust me.. I know from experience. :wacko: 'Twas me last year.

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I agree with throwing the middle tier guys out early. A lot of the big names will get thrown out right away...like Turner, AP, etc.... if you really like a middle of the road guy, throw him out early say a Moreno type..... set a dollar amount you would spend and stick to it or close.... you never want to be the guy still looking for a starting running back or 2 and come to find there are only a couple left. You end up OVERPAYING for SUBPAR players.

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CR has given good advice. Auctions are about all I like to do. It obviates the problem of being stuck at a draft position you don't like.

 

Be very fluid - have an "outline" more than a plan. TIER YOUR PLAYERS!!! Don't get stuck on player A and bid 10% over what you think is max versus looking at five players who you think will be roughly equivalent. Let the other guy overpay. At the same time, if you feel strongly about one particular player in a group don't be afraid to bid an extra dollar on him - just not $20 more.

 

Also, if others are big on one player that you absolutely don't want to take (maybe you think the loss of Harrison will kill Manning this year) then throw those players out early to drain money quickly. Maybe you don't trust the Cardinals to do it again, you'd throw out Fitz/Bouldin and Warner to drain money.

 

Never pay more than $1 (min bid) for a K, or even a D. The K's - well, it's just stupid. And there's always going to be a surprise D or three out there you can pick up.

 

Sit on your sleepers. If you're looking at someone, three or four others in the league are too - guaranteed. Don't try to grab them until most folks are down to minimum bids. Nothing sucks more than losing a sleeper for want of just one more dollar in the bank. And don't overpay for them. They are sleepers for a reason - they might be worthless this year.

Excellent advice, I have found it is wise to have $$ left near the end of the draft. You can really get some great values then. Sit tight unless there is a player you really want. Know what the top dollar you are willing to pay for the top players.Auction drafts are much more fun than the typical serpintine draft. Enjoy.

Edited by borge007
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For my first auction I found it useful to take the championship roster from my keeper league and see how much that cost if %'s were assigned to those players. Then I determined if I was comfortable with that level of RB, WR, and so on. Then you can say you might want better QB's and pull from the TE %'s or whatever.

 

It gives you a ballpark look at a real team and you can see if you want to slide more of your total salary towards one position or another.

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I have been doing Auction for years now, couple comments.

 

1- This was mentioned earlier, do not put your sleepers on the block until the very end. Make sure you have some coin left at the end to pay for them.

2- First few rounds put someone on the block you don't really want, and watch people grab them.

3. Make a list of the PLAYERS you want and put a dollar amount on them, try to get your starting lineup set with actual names not just amounts for positions.

4. It has been my experience that people shoot there wad early. Hang on and see what happens. Stick to your list and you wont regret it(unless your list is wrong).

5. I have yet to see the top tier guys go for what the huddle auction guide recommends Usually much more.

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Good points already covered. I'm also in the "save some for the end" strategy. However, don't save so much that you didn't spend enough to get quality starters. You need to manage the quality vs. quantity on your roster. You can get some good depth, but being deep with mediocre players doesn't win.

 

I focus on players that I think are undervalued. I might nominate a guy I like in the first round or two, but after that, I'm nominating guys that I think are over priced in order to drain people's budgets. If all of the owners are savy and seem to be trying to save money, then I'll pounce on top tier guys I like since they are not overpriced.

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Lots of great advice

 

i don't think these have been mentioned....

 

My experience has shown that usually the first "big" name per postion tends to go for the best price. Other owners are judging what this years values are going to be. Don't be afraid to take a swing early you will suprised that a player like AD if first out may go for $5 less than a player like MJD or Turner or even Westy or LT as the other owners scramble to get a tier 1 back, same goes for QB and WR/TE. I will add that my league has been doing auction or 8 years with 6 of the ten owners being the originals and even so the first guys out go for less.

 

I like to throw a handcuff out shortly after an owner buys the other end. Makes that owner spend more money right away versus sneaking the handcuff at the end. Conversly be aware that if you buy one half of a handcuff you may have to overpay for the other half.

 

Make sure to keep track of not only your CAP$ left but every other owners too. That way you know what they can bid. This is very valuable torwards the last 3rd of the draft.

 

Be able to change your stategy on the fly. The Huddel auction article talks about the 3 styles of bidding. I have used all three effectively, but only once did I go into the auction knowing which of the three I would do... Same with your budget, if you get your #1RB cheaper know where you want to use that money..if you pay more then know where you can take $ from. If the big guys are going really high sit back and let everyone else drain their cap and take more tier 3 and 4 players.

 

Also, remember if you throw a player out there make sure you have a spot on you roster for him as you may be stuck with him. Last year an ower ended up with 4 QB and 3 kickers.... Bid on players you don't want as long as you feel someone will out bid you. Get out early on those... but if you only bid on players you want the other owners will sense this and bid you up.

 

Hope this helps good luck.

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One thing that hasn't been mentioned when allocating, is your scoring system. Know it. In my auction league our QB's and WR's are pretty valuable because of how the scoring is set up so my allocation is set up accordingly. But, as others have said, everything in an auction draft is just a guide you do have to adjust by the flow of the draft. I don't have an allocation percentage that I follow but I do know where I want to spend my money and where I'm willing to spend a little extra to build a powerhouse. Another thing that hasn't been mentioned is towards the last 5 "rounds" of the draft know how much money your competition has, and the positions they need to fill, as you can save your own money by "locking" another owner out by bidding an amount that they can't respond to. Good luck, there's not a better way of drafting IMO.

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