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memo to california


Azazello1313
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I hope the get the fires contained as soon as possible, and I hope that there are no more fatalities. Every time I see fires in California I ask myself how much of this could be avoided if they just weren't such tree huggers? You never see wild out of control fires anywhere else, or if you do, they are quickly put out. I've heard the Santa Ana winds being used as an excuse for years, but in this instance, based on all the reports I've read and watched, the wind isn't an issue, as it is relatively calm.

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I hope the get the fires contained as soon as possible, and I hope that there are no more fatalities. Every time I see fires in California I ask myself how much of this could be avoided if they just weren't such tree huggers? You never see wild out of control fires anywhere else, or if you do, they are quickly put out. I've heard the Santa Ana winds being used as an excuse for years, but in this instance, based on all the reports I've read and watched, the wind isn't an issue, as it is relatively calm.

 

 

And I'm curious - what is the answer you tell yourself? I work right on the other side of the National forest where this is, and the problem with it is the remoteness and steepness of the canyons, along with 60 years of unburnt brush.

 

 

By the way:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wildfires/...wildfires_N.htm

There have been nearly 62,000 wildfires across the USA this year. No state has been hotter than Texas. A withering, two-year drought in central and southern Texas has sparked a wildfire season that has already destroyed the most structures in state history.

 

The state has recorded more than twice as many wildfires — 13,083 — as the second-most-active state, California with 5,749, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

 

I love how you post before you think.

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I hope the get the fires contained as soon as possible, and I hope that there are no more fatalities. Every time I see fires in California I ask myself how much of this could be avoided if they just weren't such tree huggers? You never see wild out of control fires anywhere else, or if you do, they are quickly put out. I've heard the Santa Ana winds being used as an excuse for years, but in this instance, based on all the reports I've read and watched, the wind isn't an issue, as it is relatively calm.

 

You've already shown you have very little clue about the causes and effects of wild-land fire behavior a couple years ago, not sure why you want to keep being the guy who always need to have an opinion no matter how ill-informed.

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And I'm curious - what is the answer you tell yourself? I work right on the other side of the National forest where this is, and the problem with it is the remoteness and steepness of the canyons, along with 60 years of unburnt brush.

 

 

By the way:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wildfires/...wildfires_N.htm

 

 

I love how you post before you think.

 

If there was some deforestation there wouldn't be that brush. I'm well aware of the wildfires we've had here in Texas. I'm also well aware most are put out easily and don't make the national news year after year after year. Could that be because we don't have 60 years of unburnt brush because we log our forests?

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If there was some deforestation there wouldn't be that brush. I'm well aware of the wildfires we've had here in Texas. I'm also well aware most are put out easily and don't make the national news year after year after year. Could that be because we don't have 60 years of unburnt brush because we log our forests?

 

 

You tell me - you're the uninformed expert. :D

 

 

 

Here's your definition of "put out easily"

 

 

The deadliest year on record for Texas wildfires in terms of destruction and fatalities was 2006, when 3,000 wildfires consumed 1.56 million acres, led to 17 deaths and destroyed 519 structures. This year's wildfires have destroyed 545 structures and killed three people.

 

 

Yeah, you guys are getting right on this stuff and minimizing damage quite well. :wacko:

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You tell me - you're the uninformed expert. :D

 

 

 

Here's your definition of "put out easily"

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, you guys are getting right on this stuff and minimizing damage quite well. :wacko:

 

What is the ration of structures destroyed per acre of total land mass for Texas and for California? Hell a pasture getting burnt doesn't really bother us too much, and in many cases it is beneficial so don't looking at the number of acres burnt is very misleading.

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What is the ration of structures destroyed per acre of total land mass for Texas and for California? Hell a pasture getting burnt doesn't really bother us too much, and in many cases it is beneficial so don't looking at the number of acres burnt is very misleading.

 

Yea, but apparently sage brush and chaparral scab lands burning on steep hills in arid Southern California happens primarily because of tree huggers. Yer not very smart.

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What is the ration of structures destroyed per acre of total land mass for Texas and for California? Hell a pasture getting burnt doesn't really bother us too much, and in many cases it is beneficial so don't looking at the number of acres burnt is very misleading.

 

 

 

Again, why don't you tell me? Your definition of "put out easily" is somewhat lacking so I'm going to stop with guessing at what you mean, because you don't know yourself. Who said acreage anyways? The stats I pointed to discuss structures and deaths.You can change the subject all you want, eventually you might change it to something you know. :wacko:

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Bottom line is the hippies in Cali don't want to do any kind of fire control which involves cutting or burning a tree. WHen Texas burns it is primarily sage brush and mesquite trees. A couple of years ago a buddy of mine worked out there and he said the most financial damage was due to fences burning down. FWIW I am willing to compare my forestry credentials with anyone here.

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Bottom line is the hippies in Cali don't want to do any kind of fire control which involves cutting or burning a tree. WHen Texas burns it is primarily sage brush and mesquite trees. A couple of years ago a buddy of mine worked out there and he said the most financial damage was due to fences burning down. FWIW I am willing to compare my forestry credentials with anyone here.

 

 

That's fine and dandy, but isn't what Perch was trying to poitn out. His " we don't have out of control fires in Texas" has been backpedaled to "what's the ratio of land/acreage burned?" once it was pointed out how ignorant his statements are. Sure, "structures" are widely defined so I'm not clear on the bearings of "damage to structures" compared between states, but that wasn't the original topic, it was "Texas doesn't have fires like California" as an implication that they have LESS fires, when in fact they have MORE. :wacko:

 

One thing neither of you "experts" have mentioned is the difficulty in the difference in the terrain between Texas and California. While certainly not flat in total, with the exception of Austin and El Paso the large cities are in by and large flat areas (SA is borderline with the flat east Texas Forests and Central hill country) fighting fires in ravines and mountain passes (where people do live) is what makes the drama of these fires "better TV news viewing" than a large pasture on fire that Perch thinks dominate Texas fire issues, along with increasing the danger to the fighters, etc.

 

But you Texans can go back to whining now.

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And I'm curious - what is the answer you tell yourself? I work right on the other side of the National forest where this is, and the problem with it is the remoteness and steepness of the canyons, along with 60 years of unburnt brush.

 

 

By the way:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wildfires/...wildfires_N.htm

 

 

I love how you post before you think.

 

So true... I mountain bike in the San Gabes (Well used to) and the terrain is very remote. The trails in some areas are very narrow and if you fall you fall off a clif. It is so sad what has happened to my wonderful playground :wacko:

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