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Gotta hand it to Al Franken


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blah blah blah blah

 

Franken talked a lot and said precious little. No wonder he won.

 

Best part of the whole thing was the loud belch about half-way through, lol

 

(PS that's the calmest "angry mob" I've ever seen)

Edited by BeeR
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Franken talked a lot and said precious little.
he said nothing

 

And the protesters said so much.

 

I was at a parade yesterday and the local Repubs marched with signs that said "Say No to Obamacare". Never mind that they turned a labor day parade into a protest march for some unknown reason... but what does that even mean? What is "Obamacare"? Are they really protesting any change to healthcare because it's working so well right now?

 

They have no idea what healthcare reform is going to look like, and they aren't participating in a discussion to shape it. They're just saying "no" to anything and everything. Morons. They could use a talk like the one Franken had because he at least got them to admit that healthcare isn't great and could use improvement even if they didn't hammer out the legislation right there on the sidewalk.

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And the protesters said so much.

 

I was at a parade yesterday and the local Repubs marched with signs that said "Say No to Obamacare". Never mind that they turned a labor day parade into a protest march for some unknown reason... but what does that even mean? What is "Obamacare"? Are they really protesting any change to healthcare because it's working so well right now?

 

They have no idea what healthcare reform is going to look like, and they aren't participating in a discussion to shape it. They're just saying "no" to anything and everything. Morons. They could use a talk like the one Franken had because he at least got them to admit that healthcare isn't great and could use improvement even if they didn't hammer out the legislation right there on the sidewalk.

That's what I don't get as well. Even heard someone say, "if it ain't broke..." Are you freaking high? Hell yes it's freaking broke!

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What I'm not seeing here is the middle ground. Some fixing is a FAR cry from handing over control of some 17% of the US economy to fedgov. And yes, the way this bill is written that is exactly what is going to happen. There are things that can be done that are between leaving it alone and going to single-payer.

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What I'm not seeing here is the middle ground. Some fixing is a FAR cry from handing over control of some 17% of the US economy to fedgov. And yes, the way this bill is written that is exactly what is going to happen. There are things that can be done that are between leaving it alone and going to single-payer.

 

The house legislation as written specifically creates single payer? Really? Link? I'll save you time, it does not.

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The house legislation as written specifically creates single payer? Really? Link? I'll save you time, it does not.

 

Burn.

 

Dude, it's "the bill"! Haven't you seen "the bill"??? It's the one and only proposal, and it guarantees the worst of everything you can imagine! Discussion is useless!

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When you put a government plan to compete against private plans under the terms of that law then yes, that's exactly what's going to happen.

 

You're more incorrect than accurate in your oversimplification.

 

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said on Fox News Sunday that a public option would destroy the private insurance system. It "would mean a government plan that would inevitably put the government between you and your doctor, and there would be no more private insurance," McConnell said.Asked why by interviewer Chris Wallace, McConnell said, "Because the private insurance people will not be able to compete with a government option."

 

McConnell is incorrect — the Democratic plan does not intend to do away with private insurance. His statement that private insurance "will not be able to compete with a government option" is challenged by nonpartisan health care experts who disagree.

 

McConnell's view is that if the government offers a cheaper, public plan, people will dump their private insurance to get lower health care premiums. Over time, this would errode the private health care system. In theory, it makes sense that people would want the health plan that saves them the most money, and experts do say some private insurance companies might struggle to survive against a government competitor. In practice, however, researchers don't believe public options would destroy the private insurance industry.

 

"Every time I hear these claims I'm astonished," said Cathy Schoen, senior vice president for the Commonwealth Fund, a foundation that studies health care and advocates more coverage for the uninsured, minorities and people with low incomes. She said a public plan could pressure private insurers to lower premiums or negotiate better rates with hospitals, but it would not put private companies out of business.

 

"The public plan could get a reputation of not being good. The private plans could say, 'Let's change our behavior so we don't lose business,'" Schoen said.

 

Another nonpartisan research group, the Urban Institute, reached similar conclusions.

 

"Private plans would not disappear. Private plans that offer better services and greater access to providers, even at somewhat higher costs than the public plans, would survive the competition in this environment," wrote John Holahan and Linda Blumberg of the Urban Institute's Health Policy Center.

 

One of the problems right now is that private insurance is not as competitive as you might think. Both the Commonwealth Fund and the Urban Insitute have noted that most health care markets are dominated by a small number of big insurers.

 

"The increased concentration has made it difficult for the nation to reap the benefits usually associated with competitive markets," Holahan and Blumberg wrote.

 

http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/st...nce-can-surviv/

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And the protesters said so much.

 

I was at a parade yesterday and the local Repubs marched with signs that said "Say No to Obamacare". Never mind that they turned a labor day parade into a protest march for some unknown reason... but what does that even mean? What is "Obamacare"? Are they really protesting any change to healthcare because it's working so well right now?

 

They have no idea what healthcare reform is going to look like, and they aren't participating in a discussion to shape it. They're just saying "no" to anything and everything. Morons. They could use a talk like the one Franken had because he at least got them to admit that healthcare isn't great and could use improvement even if they didn't hammer out the legislation right there on the sidewalk.

 

 

and where did i say the dolts protesting said anything either? this topic was about how much franken enlightened. he did none of that.

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What I'm not seeing here is the middle ground. Some fixing is a FAR cry from handing over control of some 17% of the US economy to fedgov. And yes, the way this bill is written that is exactly what is going to happen. There are things that can be done that are between leaving it alone and going to single-payer.

Oh there you go, trying to throw out some common sense middle ground concept. Where you been boy? People HATE that now. It's all about simpleton extremism. My side good! Your side bad! That's it! blah!

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And the protesters said so much.

 

I was at a parade yesterday and the local Repubs marched with signs that said "Say No to Obamacare". Never mind that they turned a labor day parade into a protest march for some unknown reason... but what does that even mean? What is "Obamacare"? Are they really protesting any change to healthcare because it's working so well right now?

 

They have no idea what healthcare reform is going to look like, and they aren't participating in a discussion to shape it. They're just saying "no" to anything and everything. Morons. They could use a talk like the one Franken had because he at least got them to admit that healthcare isn't great and could use improvement even if they didn't hammer out the legislation right there on the sidewalk.

Yeah cuz we need more talks where nothing is said. PS the fact that the protesters here didn't say much of anything doesn't change the fact that Franken didn't either......and I would think he's a bit more responsible for doing so than they are, being a Senator and all. But really that's more an indictment of politicians in general vs Franken per se. I just think it's funny/telling that people are going "great job Al!" when he didn't say squat.

 

 

By the way, I'm not even sure I want a public option. I'm just tired of the misinformation campaign.

Don't expect a rest anytime soon, cuz that's practically all that's coming your way the rest of the way out. I would hope that we can all agree at least that this is a complex issue (I know that because Franken said so btw - gotta love the water-is-wet stuff), and unfortunately, that combined with the general public's limited mental capacities makes such misinformation so easy to do and so clouds the issue that extremely few really know the score and what the "real plan" even is.

 

 

You're more incorrect than accurate in your oversimplification.

 

http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/st...nce-can-surviv/

From the article:

 

McConnell is incorrect — the Democratic plan does not intend to do away with private insurance. His statement that private insurance "will not be able to compete with a government option" is challenged by nonpartisan health care experts who disagree.

 

"Every time I hear these claims I'm astonished," said Cathy Schoen, senior vice president for the Commonwealth Fund, a foundation that studies health care and advocates more coverage for the uninsured, minorities and people with low incomes.

 

Another nonpartisan research group, the Urban Institute, reached similar conclusions.

 

Yeah, they sound REAL unbiased. No problem trusting their "expertise." :wacko:

 

 

and where did i say the dolts protesting said anything either? this topic was about how much franken enlightened. he did none of that.
Stop confusing us with facts, you evil right-wing lunatic.
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What an intelligent, mature reply. I can't wait for "I know you are but what am I"

 

I used the same criteria you did.

 

Franken engaged people in a discussion, and appeared to get people to think.

I'm not sure you were as effective, but I was giving you the benefit of the doubt.

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