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rajncajn

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21 hours ago, rajncajn said:

I've got some Old Rasputin chilling icy in the fridge to wash it down as well.

 

Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout | North Coast Brewing Co.

 

I love their barrel aged and old stock ales... Brother thelonious is one of my favorites.  Only a couple of hours away, but hard to break away these days.  When I was purchasing, North Coast invited us for a tasting dinner in Napa. very fun event.

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5 minutes ago, Bier Meister said:

 

I love their barrel aged and old stock ales... Brother thelonious is one of my favorites.  Only a couple of hours away, but hard to break away these days.  When I was purchasing, North Coast invited us for a tasting dinner in Napa. very fun event.

I've had it before years ago but I never see it around here. Then, when I was in San Diego, a place I went to for dinner had it on tap. I put a note in my phone to look for it (and Dragon's Milk) next time I'm in Mobile because we don't get ish in Mississippi. Then this weekend I stopped off at a convenience store that normally has a good selection specifically looking for a more local coffee stout called Judge Roy Bean from Fairhope Brewing Company and, lo and behold, there was the Old Rasputin. They actually had Brother Thelonius sitting next to it & I thought about getting both. Next time I go I'll check to see if it's still there.

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Told the Mrs that I'm thinking about trying to smoke a turkey this year on the Weber. Apparently it's easier than I thought and I'll just need to come up with a good brine solution. Looking for some recipes now. @Bier Meister, I've read pecan (which I have) is good for smoking poultry, but wondering if I should go a little milder with apple if I go that route and possibly do a Cajun smoked turkey. I've seen a couple of recipes for rosemary smoked turkey and I'm maybe leaning towards that as well since I have a few rosemary bushes. The recipes I've read recommend a couple of different brine methods though. One says that a wet brine is the only way to keep it moist while another says dry brining it then buttering it under the skin is the only way to get the skin crispy and keep the bird moist. Since I'm using the Weber it'll be a little more difficult to adjust the temps, but I use both an internal wireless thermometer and a grill temp thermometer, so I'm really not worried about keeping the temp regulated or reaching the right internal temp. I'm more worried about ending up with a dry, inedible bird.

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1 hour ago, Bier Meister said:

Let's see... over the past couple of weeks:

 

Mini Oktoberfest... Jager schnitzel, red cabbage, spätzle, German potato salad

 

pesto chicken with roasted red potatoes

 

sirloin with balsamic glaze, truffle mashed potatoes

 

homemade pizza with local sausage and wild mushrooms

 

used same tomato sauce for a bucatini with rock shrimp

 

harvest salad with roasted sweet potato (pomegranate vinegar), toasted chevre, sunflower seeds... sherry/honey vinaigrette  (with aged Spanish sherry vinegar)

 

Chicken satay, shrimp pad thai

 

 

 

Would be curious to hear about or see your German potato salad, I've yet to find many places that make it the way my mom did. (She grew up in a German kitchen in Eastern Europe and came to the states in the 50s.) I've got the recipe and a couple of my siblings have made it to near perfection. Then one of my nephews decided it needed bacon and other stuff. 

 

Anyway its simply boiled potatoes peeled and sliced, add sliced onion, and a vinegar and oil (maybe butter or lard even in the old days) with seasoning, lots of pepper, served warm. Went out for some German food at a place in Kalamazoo MI (Chau Haus Schniztel Sataion) with my brother last weekend, the schnitzel was good, the spatzle too (I should have had some gravy on the side.)  Brother tried the cucumber salad which I tasted, we agreed it had way to much dill, I went with the broccoli. I would have tried the German potato salad or sauerkraut if not for some odd things in them (sweet/sour sauce in pot salad, apple and bacon in the sauerkraut. (Mom also used to make a great cuke salad with sour cream and vinegar added to cukes and onions, I've been making that for holiday dinners since a couple years after she passed. My entire family loves it, even one sibling with lactose intolerance will take his pill so he can eat some)   If we go back to that place I'm going to try the 2 piece dinner, one piece was pretty good and filling, but a 2nd was only $2 more ($16 for 1 piece dinner with 2 sides). 

 

Damn now I'm hungry....and just a sandwich for lunch (but meatloaf for dinner).

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i'm not a big fan of mayo, so i often stay away from those items. but i do make some good stuff..... do you like german potato salad?

 

2 1/4 pounds medium-size red-skinned potatoes, unpeeled, cut into

1/4-inch-thick slices

6 bacon slices, chopped

1/2 cup finely chopped red onion

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 cup water

2 teaspoons coarse-grained mustard

2 teaspoons sugar

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

1/4 cup chopped fresh dill

Steam potatoes until tip of knife easily pierces center of slices, about 10 minutes. Transfer to large bowl. Cover with foil.

Sauté bacon in large skillet over medium heat until brown, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Discard all but 2 1/2 tablespoons drippings. Heat drippings in skillet over medium heat. Add onion; sauté 2 minutes. Whisk in next 6 ingredients. Simmer until mixture is reduced to 2/3 cup, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat.

 

Add potatoes to skillet and toss to coat with dressing. Let stand 3 minutes. Sprinkle with chopped bacon and fresh dill; toss. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer potato salad to serving platter. Serve warm

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There is a food an beverage forum, which is locked.  We can still search in it though

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39 minutes ago, Bier Meister said:

There is a food an beverage forum, which is locked.  We can still search in it though

The turkey thread is right there toward the top. Thanks!

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54 minutes ago, Bier Meister said:

i'm not a big fan of mayo, so i often stay away from those items. but i do make some good stuff..... do you like german potato salad?

 

2 1/4 pounds medium-size red-skinned potatoes, unpeeled, cut into

1/4-inch-thick slices

6 bacon slices, chopped

1/2 cup finely chopped red onion

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 cup water

2 teaspoons coarse-grained mustard

2 teaspoons sugar

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

1/4 cup chopped fresh dill

Steam potatoes until tip of knife easily pierces center of slices, about 10 minutes. Transfer to large bowl. Cover with foil.

Sauté bacon in large skillet over medium heat until brown, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Discard all but 2 1/2 tablespoons drippings. Heat drippings in skillet over medium heat. Add onion; sauté 2 minutes. Whisk in next 6 ingredients. Simmer until mixture is reduced to 2/3 cup, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat.

 

Add potatoes to skillet and toss to coat with dressing. Let stand 3 minutes. Sprinkle with chopped bacon and fresh dill; toss. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer potato salad to serving platter. Serve warm

 

I like mayo, and have grown to like regular potato salad, but with schnitzel (meatloaf, fried chicken, etc) German potato salad is the bomb. 

 

Interesting recipe, the part with putting them in a skillet and browning them is very different, as is the bacon. 

 

My mom's recipe (wasn't sure I had it) doesn't do that nor does it include bacon, dill, sugar or mustard. We use white potatoes, boil peel then slice while still hot and add thinly sliced onions. Mix the liquids/spices in a pan then mix with the potatoes. I always recall it tasting better the 2nd time, like many things with a sauce where it works into the other items. 

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@DMD

 

Would you be willing to reopen the F&B forum again?  We have our controversies, but no one is melting down over charcoal vs propane.

 

Thank you

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1 minute ago, stevegrab said:

 

I like mayo, and have grown to like regular potato salad, but with schnitzel (meatloaf, fried chicken, etc) German potato salad is the bomb. 

 

Interesting recipe, the part with putting them in a skillet and browning them is very different, as is the bacon. 

 

My mom's recipe (wasn't sure I had it) doesn't do that nor does it include bacon, dill, sugar or mustard. We use white potatoes, boil peel then slice while still hot and add thinly sliced onions. Mix the liquids/spices in a pan then mix with the potatoes. I always recall it tasting better the 2nd time, like many things with a sauce where it works into the other items. 

 

I will sometimes use a little sour cream or creme fraiche for texture

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2 minutes ago, Bier Meister said:

 

I will sometimes use a little sour cream or creme fraiche for texture

 

Don't get all french on me :)      I like sour cream, grew up eating it as a topping on stuffed cabbage and stuffed peppers (more of mom's specialities). Many people I know from our culture (Romanian) are shocked to see that, I think it was a regional style (maybe with the German kitchen influence), 

 

Its also something I remember mom using in a special sour soup (chicken or other meats), I believe it was lemon juice mixed with it, then stirred into the soup where it made a nice color and thickness. One of my brothers is a really good cook and picked up a lot of these things from my mom, including making crepes. 

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14 minutes ago, stevegrab said:

 

Don't get all french on me :)      I like sour cream, grew up eating it as a topping on stuffed cabbage and stuffed peppers (more of mom's specialities). Many people I know from our culture (Romanian) are shocked to see that, I think it was a regional style (maybe with the German kitchen influence), 

 

Its also something I remember mom using in a special sour soup (chicken or other meats), I believe it was lemon juice mixed with it, then stirred into the soup where it made a nice color and thickness. One of my brothers is a really good cook and picked up a lot of these things from my mom, including making crepes. 

 

I was french trained and much of what I did had a strong european backbone.

 

i have some austria and hungarian.  sour cream is used a bit in the eastern block countries.

 

Edit: slurries are thickening agents made from liquid (citrus juice, or water) and corn starch.

Edited by Bier Meister
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4 hours ago, Bier Meister said:

@DMD

 

Would you be willing to reopen the F&B forum again?  We have our controversies, but no one is melting down over charcoal vs propane.

 

Thank you

 

Sure, let me look into it

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18 minutes ago, DMD said:

 

Sure, let me look into it

Merci 

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10 hours ago, Bier Meister said:

 

It is visible, but we cannot post in there

 

How about now?

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14 minutes ago, DMD said:

 

How about now?


boo yah!

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