Jump to content

Anyone seen that Mitsibushi Mr Slim A/C unit?


TimC
 Share

Recommended Posts

My master bedroom has cathedral ceilings, and even with a big ole ceiling fan, is hotter than the rest of the downstairs with it's normal 9 foot ceilings. I saw a commercial for these Ductless AC units that can cool one room. It's not as ghetto as a window unit.

 

 

http://www.mrslim.com/Products/userSpecific.asp?Commercial=0

 

Looks like it's under $1,500 for a 2.0 ton 13 SEER unit for the unit and who knows how much for the install. Good buy or is there something else I should consider?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My master bedroom has cathedral ceilings, and even with a big ole ceiling fan, is hotter than the rest of the downstairs with it's normal 9 foot ceilings. I saw a commercial for these Ductless AC units that can cool one room. It's not as ghetto as a window unit.

 

 

http://www.mrslim.com/Products/userSpecific.asp?Commercial=0

 

Looks like it's under $1,500 for a 2.0 ton 13 SEER unit for the unit and who knows how much for the install. Good buy or is there something else I should consider?

 

You should consider making your draft pick in MSHB :wacko:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems like a lot to spend for one room. I assume you have your fan going in the proper direction for the summer. Did you call your AC guy to see if they can add an extra vent in the room? Or perhaps a return vent in the room is needed.

 

I'm considering doing that. I figure it's just a couple of hundred bucks labor and material to add another vent? Of course, I should've upgraded the AC unit. I think the builder gave me the bottom of the barrel or close to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What helped cool our upper levels (5 w/ the basement) was when we replaced the AC/furnace my mechanic installed a fan for a 3 or 4 ton AC unit. It really brought a lot more air upstairs in both seasons, but most notable in the summer. He also raised the furnace about 6" off the floor to get more flow.

Edited by rocknrobn26
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My master bedroom has cathedral ceilings, and even with a big ole ceiling fan, is hotter than the rest of the downstairs with it's normal 9 foot ceilings. I saw a commercial for these Ductless AC units that can cool one room. It's not as ghetto as a window unit.

 

 

http://www.mrslim.com/Products/userSpecific.asp?Commercial=0

 

Looks like it's under $1,500 for a 2.0 ton 13 SEER unit for the unit and who knows how much for the install. Good buy or is there something else I should consider?

Mitsubishi? MITSUBISHI? :wacko: Who the Hell are you and what have you done with TimC's corpse?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What level is your master on?

 

First floor master. What's the ball-park figure install usually run on these? If that's equal to the cost of the unit then no way.

 

It's a good-size room and they only have 3 vents. I'm thinking of adding another one. Will that help?

Edited by TimC
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First floor master. What's the ball-park figure install usually run on these? If that's equal to the cost of the unit then no way.

 

It's a good-size room and they only have 3 vents. I'm thinking of adding another one. Will that help?

Does it have a return vent Tim? Even with your ceiling fan....it sounds like a couple things.

 

1. The rising hot air has no where to escape (hence the return). In a room that size, you should actually have a connected return with an upper and lower vent I think. Upper open/lower closed in the summer......reversed in the winter. So it acts as a warm air return in the summer.....a cold air return in the winter. :wacko: I'm not an HVAC specialist, but I've seen this done and it works well.

2. Your MSBR is the furthest from your A/C unit......and will always be a little warmer than the rest of the house in that case.

3. They didn't put in a big enough unit in your house in the first place. Or it should have been zoned with two units.

 

These solitary units are pretty great for a space like your bedroom. You don't want to crank the A/C for the whole house at night just to get your bedroom to a comfortable temp. Your bedroom might be 70.....but the rest of your house will be 63.....lol. And your electric bill will be astronomical. Two or three summers of that...and you could have this Mitsubishi unit paid for.

 

I have about a 5 degree difference between my upper and lower floors......old 1950's house with no upper level return vents. In lieu of cutting one in with the new A/C installation 2 yrs ago.....we just decided to either live with it or use a window unit to help out upstairs if we needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dampers and return vents...now it's getting over mah head.

 

Bunz, I have a return (is that the thing with the filter?) by the stairs that IMO helps suck the cool air out of the bedroom. And yes, my MBRM is the furthest from the unit in the attic. I have two zones...one for upstairs and one for downstairs. My electric bill is averages a nice $300-350 a month. So you're saying put another return in the bedroom?

 

CD, I have no idea about dampers. It was built in 2006...was this required then or is it an option?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:wacko:

 

The Mitsubishi A6M Zero was a fighter aircraft operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service (IJNAS) from 1940 to 1945. The origin of its official designation was that "A" signified a carrier-based fighter, "6" for the sixth such model built for the Imperial Navy, and "M" for the manufacturer, Mitsubishi. The A6M was usually referred to by the Allies as the "Zero"—a name that was frequently misapplied to other Japanese fighters, such as the Nakajima Ki-43—as well as other codenames and nicknames, including "Zeke", "Hamp" and "Hap".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dampers and return vents...now it's getting over mah head.

 

Bunz, I have a return (is that the thing with the filter?) by the stairs that IMO helps suck the cool air out of the bedroom. And yes, my MBRM is the furthest from the unit in the attic. I have two zones...one for upstairs and one for downstairs. My electric bill is averages a nice $300-350 a month. So you're saying put another return in the bedroom?

 

CD, I have no idea about dampers. It was built in 2006...was this required then or is it an option?

Tim...the dampers CD is talking about are on the trunks coming out of your unit. It's a little lever that controls the air flow on each trunk. Sometimes you can maximize the air balance by slightly closing down shorter trunks to nearer destinations in the house....and fully opening up the dampers in the trunks going to further parts of the house. If you had all the dampers set the same......you'd find that rooms closer to your unit cool down much faster......right?

 

The lever will be parallel (pointing exactly along the pipe) when fully open.....and 90 degrees or perpendicular when completely closed. I completely close my basement trunks in the summer.....basement stays cool enough and then I can get more airflow to the rest of the house.

 

Yes......if you have a "cold air return" cut in at the bottom of your wall near the stairs.....yes...some of the cold air is getting sucked into it. Because of the volume and height of your bedroom.....they maybe should have done a set up like I described with dual vents up and down so that you could regulate it more according to season.

 

Problem is...just like water in a glass.....you can only pump so much air into a space. If the "old air" doesn't have a place to escape.....pumping more in won't help. For the short term.....you might try blocking that cold air return.....see if you can at least keep the cool air to stay IN the space longer. Chances are a good portion of the cool air coming out of your vents is going directly to your air return and not even staying in the room long enough to get up past your knees....lol. But that won't solve the problem of getting the warm air out at ceiling height.

 

If you can get up in the attic and look at the dampers for your upper zone.....try slightly shutting down the trunks closer to the source.....and making sure the one to your master is open to full. As far as your ceiling fan goes......you want it to pull the (cool) air up in the summer.....and push the (warm) air down in the winter.

 

If all else fails.....get your original HVAC contractor out there to help solve the problem. They put it in.....he'll be familiar with the system. And if he worked out the design for your architect, he should be willing to fix the problem for you with a minimum charge.

Edited by SteelBunz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If all else fails.....get your original HVAC contractor out there to help solve the problem. They put it in.....he'll be familiar with the system. And if he worked out the design for your architect, he should be willing to fix the problem for you with a minimum charge.

 

This is good advice. Our company will go out and do a balance call for a customer, and they should be able to show you where dampers are, how the trunks are run, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information